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Irish Beekeeping List

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  • Computer Software Solutions Ltd
    Hello All I thought I would mention the Irish Beekeeping List. It is in operation only since 1st December and we now have 79 members. I would welcome you to
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 8, 2000
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      Hello All

      I thought I would mention the Irish Beekeeping List. It is in operation only
      since 1st December and we now have 79 members.

      I would welcome you to join the list to avail of and participate in, good
      discussion on beekeeping topics.

      I show below the procedures associated with the list.

      SUBSCRIBING TO THE LIST.


      Send an e mail to

      IrishBeekeeping-subscribe@...

      Do not put anything in the Subject or in the body of the message.

      You will obtain an acknowledgment and you will be asked to reply to it. You
      are now a subscriber.

      SENDING A MESSAGE TO EVERYBODY ON THE LIST.

      To send a message to everybody on the list, send an e mail to

      IrishBeekeeping@...



      UNSUBSCRIBING FROM THE LIST.

      At any time, if you decide to unsubscribe from the list (maybe when going on
      holidays etc), do the following:

      Send an e mail to

      IrishBeekeeping-unsubscribe@...


      Sincerely

      Tom Barrett
      49 South Park Foxrock
      Dublin 18
      Ireland
    • Bruce & Joyce
      Re-posting a re-post here, but if you haven t heard, it may be of interest. Joyce in Peggs I received this article from another list but felt it was an
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 8, 2000
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        Re-posting a re-post here, but if you haven't heard, it may be of interest.
        Joyce in Peggs

        I received this article from another list but felt it was an important
        issue since we depend on the honey bee to pollinate many of the wild edibles
        we enjoy so much. I have a huge hornets nest my hubby wanted me to remove
        this winter but I hate to do this because of the impact it could have on the
        ecology here on our own place.

        When I am going out to forage I just put on long pants and long sleeves to
        protect myself from stings and insect bites for the most part, but it is
        very important not to kill these natural garden helpers. I can't remember
        which wasp it is but there is one that lays eggs on the tomato worm that
        kills them. Whenever I see one of these worms in my tomato patch covered
        with the eggs I leave it alone and just destroy the others, but even then I
        wonder what benefit they might be.

        Source: American Chemical Society (http://www.acs.org/)


        Date: Posted 9/30/99

        New Hope For Declining U.S. Honeybee Population
        Chances are, you haven't seen honeybees in your flower garden for quite some
        time. Bumblebees and carpenter bees, perhaps, but not honeybees. Parasitic
        mites have dramatically reduced the honeybee population in this country,
        wreaking havoc on commercial bee farms and threatening farmers who rely on
        bees to pollinate their crops.
        Researchers with the U. S. Department of Agriculture in Beltsville, Md.,
        report they may be able to stem the decline in the honeybee population with
        a gel containing formic acid. Writing in the Sept. 20 issue of the Journal
        of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the researchers report that the gel
        kills 70 - 85 percent of varroa mites, which literally suck the life from
        bees by feeding on their body fluids, and 100 percent of tracheal mites,
        which live in bees' tracheae and interfere with breathing. The peer-reviewed
        journal is published by the American Chemical Society, the world's largest
        scientific society. The article was initially published on the journal's web
        site on Aug. 21.

        Produced naturally by some ants as a defense against predators, formic acid
        can be dangerous in large quantities if handled improperly. And it must be
        reapplied frequently to be effective against bee mites, according to the
        article's lead author, Jan Kochansky, Ph.D., of the USDA's Bee Research
        Laboratory in Beltsville.

        "Formic acid has been used in other countries for years to control parasitic
        mites of honeybees," says Kochansky. But until now, he says, large-scale use
        has been impractical.

        "Formic acid's mobility and corrosive properties make it dangerous to the
        user and have made bee supply companies unwilling to risk the liability
        associated with its use," according to Kochansky. "We have developed a gel
        formulation that is easier and safer to handle [than the liquid form] and
        emits formic acid vapors over two to three weeks, reducing the labor
        associated with its use."

        The varroa and tracheal mites entered the U.S. in the mid-1980s. Since then,
        they have decimated both wild and commercial bee populations.

        "Both mites now inhabit honeybee colonies in most of the country," states
        the research article. "Infestation of a honeybee colony with either mite can
        lead to loss of the colony, but colony mortality caused by the varroa mite
        can reach essentially 100 percent in temperate regions."

        Two compounds are widely used in the United States to control bee mites: the
        pesticide fluvalinate used for varroa mites and menthol used for tracheal
        mites. While menthol remains effective against tracheal mites, varroa mites
        in some regions of the United States have developed resistance to
        fluvalinate, as has already occurred in parts of Europe. "The migratory
        nature of commercial beekeeping means that this resistance will spread
        rapidly to most areas of the country," claims Kochansky. Another compound,
        coumaphos, is used in some states to help control fluvalinate-resistant
        varroa mites, he notes.

        A patent for the formic acid gel is pending; a manufacturing license has
        been issued to BetterBee, Inc. of Greenwich, N.Y. EPA registered the gel in
        August.


        Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by American
        Chemical Society for journalists and other members of the public. If you
        wish to quote from any part of this story, please credit American Chemical
        Society as the original source. You may also wish to include the following
        link in any citation:

        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990930071452.htm
      • Computer Software Solutions Ltd
        Hello All We now have an Irish Beekeeping List in operation which has over 110 subscribers. I show below the procedures for the list. Sincerely Tom Barrett 49
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 14, 2000
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          Hello All

          We now have an Irish Beekeeping List in operation which has over 110
          subscribers.



          I show below the procedures for the list.


          Sincerely

          Tom Barrett
          49 South Park
          Foxrock
          Dublin 18
          Ireland


          SUBSCRIBING TO THE LIST.

          Send an e mail to

          IrishBeekeeping-subscribe@...

          Do not put anything in the Subject or in the body of the message.

          You will obtain an acknowledgment and you will be asked to reply to it. You
          are now a subscriber.


          SENDING A MESSAGE TO EVERYBODY ON THE LIST.

          To send a message to everybody on the list, send an e mail to

          IrishBeekeeping@...


          PROCEDURES FOR VIEWING THE ARCHIVES

          Click on Member Login, Click on View List Archives and Click on Irish
          Beekeeping discussion list.
        • Computer Software Solutions Ltd
          Hello All I show below the instructions for the Irish Beekeeping List. Despite its name, there are now more beekeepers on the list from outside Ireland than
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 27, 2000
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            Hello All

            I show below the instructions for the Irish Beekeeping List.

            Despite its name, there are now more beekeepers on the list from outside
            Ireland than from inside Ireland. In many ways this mirrors the Irish -
            there are more of us outside Ireland that there are in Ireland!.

            This list was started with the primary purpose of getting discussion going
            on varroa, The pest was first found in Ireland in June 1998. A high
            percentage of the postings are varroa related and we have learned a lot from
            these interchanges. Most of the knowledge on varroa has come from our new
            found friends in countries with considerable experience of this pest and we
            are very grateful for the help which they have given us.

            With the recent discovery of varroa in New Zealand, the List will be of
            assistance to beekeepers in that country. At this time many New Zealand
            beekeepers have joined us.

            If you would like to join us and partake in these lively discussions, please
            see the instructions below

            PROCEDURES FOR JOINING THE LIST.

            Send an e mail to

            IrishBeekeeping-subscribe@...

            Do not put anything in the Subject or in the body of the message.

            You will obtain an acknowledgment and you will be asked to reply to it. You
            are now a subscriber. Membership of the list is completely free of charge.


            SENDING A MESSAGE TO EVERYBODY ON THE LIST.

            To send a message to everybody on the list, send an e mail to

            IrishBeekeeping@...


            PROCEDURES FOR VIEWING THE ARCHIVES

            To see the archives visit http://www.listbot.com

            Click on Member Login, Click on View List Archives and Click on Irish
            Beekeeping discussion list.


            Sincerely

            Tom Barrett
            49 South Park
            Foxrock
            Dublin 18
            Ireland
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