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Inspections after the second story is added

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  • karaho@aol.com
    My first bees, hived in mid-May, are doing really well so far. Last week s inspection showed that they had just about filled 7 of their 9 frames (lots of
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 14, 2004
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      My first bees, hived in mid-May, are doing really well so far. Last week's
      inspection showed that they had just about filled 7 of their 9 frames (lots of
      capped cells, queen present and well-attended, frames are heavy with water and
      honey being stored, fat white larva present in nice numbers, plenty of
      activity) so this past weekend I added the upper deep.

      How does this change the way I do regular inspections? Do I just check on
      what's happening in the second floor and assume that all is well in the lower
      deep, or am I still supposed to be inspecting individual frames in the bottom
      story? And if so, how?

      Thanks,
      Nancy
      karaho@...
    • Michael Fry
      ... I do regular inspections? Do I just check on what s happening in the second floor and assume that all is well in the lower deep, or am I still supposed to
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 14, 2004
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        karaho@... wrote:
        > this past weekend I added the upper deep. How does this change the way
        I do regular inspections? Do I just check on what's
        happening in the
        second floor and assume that all is well in the lower deep,
        or am I
        still supposed to be inspecting individual frames in the bottom
        story? And if so, how?

        In my long, illustrious career in beekeeping (i.e., 9 weeks)
        I've decided that there's some value in looking into both
        deeps. First, if there's little activity up top (e.g.,
        they're still drawing out the comb), looking there alone
        won't tell you much. Second, even if the queen's up top and
        laying nicely, it might still be worthwhile to look below.
        For example, if there are lots of empty cells that the queen
        could be laying in, you might need to swap empty brood
        frames from down below with uncapped/capped brood frames
        from above. That way she'll have more room to lay.)

        As for how to do it, I inspect the top deep, then place it
        on top of the upside-down outer cover--if the queen drops,
        she'll still be relatively safe and easy to find.

        HTH,
        mf
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