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Handling Pollen

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  • Susan Jordan
    Well, this list has been rather quiet lately. I hope everyone had a nice holiday and a Happy New Year (I trust you all survived Y2K). Anyways, this coming
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 1, 2000
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      Well, this list has been rather quiet lately. I hope everyone had a nice
      holiday and a Happy New Year (I trust you all survived Y2K). Anyways, this
      coming beekeeping year, I am going to collect pollen from my hives. I
      purchased one of the new plastic pollen traps last year and I was wondering
      about other beekeepers procedure in caring for the pollen after it is
      harvested (cleaning,drying) Also, I am aware that you can freeze it, what
      about not freezing it, will that work. I was told by someone that pollen is
      more potent when it hasn't been frozen - not sure if it's true though. Well,
      thanks anyways.

      Susan Jordan
      Ontario, Canada
    • Bentoak398@xxx.xxx
      In a message dated 1/1/00 6:50:15 AM US Central Standard Time, geronimo_13@hotmail.com writes:
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 1, 2000
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        In a message dated 1/1/00 6:50:15 AM US Central Standard Time,
        geronimo_13@... writes:

        << Anyways, this
        coming beekeeping year, I am going to collect pollen from my hives. I
        purchased one of the new plastic pollen traps last year and I was wondering
        about other beekeepers procedure in caring for the pollen after it is
        harvested (cleaning,drying) >>

        Hi Susan,
        I have not yet got into getting bee hives, but plan to when my orchard
        is at least half planted........it's about a half acre in size. I joined the
        list to get better prepared when I finally take the plunge.
        What will you be using the pollen for?
        Joy :o)

        Joy Beach
        Bent Oak Farms
        Lake City, (east) Tennessee
      • Susan Jordan
        Well, since this year was my first year of selling honey, I had a few requests from a woman who is involved in health food, and a woman looking for pollen for
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 2, 2000
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          Well, since this year was my first year of selling honey, I had a few
          requests from a woman who is involved in health food, and a woman looking
          for pollen for her son who has asthma. Pollen can be used for many different
          things. Local pollen, when ingested can relieve symptoms of hayfever. When
          it is put under your tongue, it can reduce the swelling from a very recent
          insect sting (mainly wasps and bees), pollen can also be eaten every day as
          a food supplement as pollen has every nutrient needed to survive except
          water and roughage. Imagine, that is all from pollen. I did an independent
          study on the use of honey in medicine for gr. 13 Biology (I am only 17 years
          old) and you wouldn't believe the uses. Honey can be placed in any open
          cavity in the body to assist in healing and prevent/reduce infection.
          Beekeeping is an amazing thing whether it is a hobby of a profession. The
          greatest fun is talking about it to all who think bees only make honey. Once
          you get your hives, I am sure you will find it VERY rewarding in fruit and
          honey. We have a small orchard, and when I got the bees only three years
          ago, we got a huge amount of fruit from trees that had never given us fruit
          before. Enjoy!

          Susan Jordan
          Ontario, Canada
        • Garry Libby
          Hi Susan, Pollen has to be dried to prevent it from spoiling. The easiest way is to spread it on a cookie sheet and put it in a warm (the older style oven with
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 2, 2000
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            Hi Susan,
            Pollen has to be dried to prevent it from spoiling. The easiest way is
            to spread it on a cookie sheet and put it in a warm (the older style oven
            with a pilot flame is sometimes just warm enough) oven 'till the pollen
            granules are not sticky or pliable. After it is dry it is put in jars and
            frozen for a few days. It is frozen to kill any eggs that it may contain, I
            never heard of frozen pollen being less potent. You could also freeze it
            instead of drying it, You would spread it on a cookie sheet and freeze it,
            then put it in jars and keep frozen. A one pound honey jar holds 1/2 pound
            of pollen, a two pound jar holds one pound, etc. This Tuesday evening PBS
            airs a new program about bees that I think will be fascinating. It is on the
            Nova program at 9:00 PM in My area. They will actually show a queen laying
            an egg in a cell (filmed from within the cell!) The website is great! Here
            is the address:
            http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/bees/hive.html
            I hope this helps.
            Garry Libby
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