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Package Bees

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  • AlphaBat@aol.com
    I am looking for some advice. I hived a new 3# package of bees on May 1st. I checked on them again this weekend and saw the queen but no evidence of laying
    Message 1 of 15 , May 25, 1999
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      I am looking for some advice.

      I hived a new 3# package of bees on May 1st.

      I checked on them again this weekend and saw the queen but no evidence of
      laying activity except for a few capped drone cells.

      They have drawn out only about 4 frames -- and those only about half the
      frames.

      I have been feeding them sugar syrup.

      I live in the Berkshires and it is still gets cold at night -- in the high
      forty's or low fifty's. Is this retarding the egg laying, or should I
      suspect something is wrong.

      My friend who hived a package the same day down in Stamford CT (where it has
      been warmer) has capped brood, larvae, eggs. And 7-8 out of 10 of the frames
      in his first brood chamber are drawn out.

      I have seen the queen all three weekends when I have gone into the hive.
      They are bringing in nectar and pollen and have what comb they have drawn out
      filled with capped honey, pollen, and uncapped nectar.

      Anyone have any thoughts or reassurances.

      Bruce
    • tiffany n osander
      I think they are fine, just give them some time. It hasn t even been a month yet! I don t think they are slow, I think your friend s bees are fast! Every hive
      Message 2 of 15 , May 25, 1999
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        I think they are fine, just give them some time. It hasn't even been a
        month yet! I don't think they are slow, I think your friend's bees are
        fast! Every hive is different, and every hive is different each season. I
        think that if anything is retarding their progress it is that you seem to
        be going in to their hive VERY often. This should be done as LITTLE as
        possible! I know you are anxious, but everytime they are smoked or
        bothered it sets them back about 3 weeks, so just try to let them be. I
        think the cold weather may be making them slightly sluggish, but if you
        just leave them alone and give the weather some time to clear up they
        will be just fine. Also, is it necessary to still be feeding them sugar
        water? It's been a while, but I don't remember feeding mine for that
        long. If you can take them off they may have incentive to work a little
        harder, but make sure they are ready, because like I said, I don't
        remember for sure how long I fed mine.
        Hope that helps,
        TIFFANY osander@...
        mom, student, massage therapist, beekeeper,
        apprentice fire dancer, cometgoddess
        "Leave a little to nature; she understands her business better than we
        do."
        -Montaigne, Essays, 1595

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      • AlphaBat@xxx.xxx
        Thanks for the reassurances. They are gentle or busy, so I don t have to smoke them to look in on them and I do try to be as unobtrusive as I can be. I have
        Message 3 of 15 , May 25, 1999
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          Thanks for the reassurances.
          They are gentle or busy, so I don't have to smoke them to look in on them and
          I do try to be as unobtrusive as I can be.
          I have searched and found the queen each weekend though because it seems to
          me when I hived bees last year that they were much more vigorous in drawing
          out comb -- but I may not be remembering right.
          They seem to have stopped using the sugar water as much as they were, but
          they are still taking some.

          Bruce
        • tiffany n osander
          I just re-read your post. You said: They are bringing in nectar and pollen and have what comb they have drawn out filled with capped honey, pollen, and
          Message 4 of 15 , May 25, 1999
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            I just re-read your post. You said:

            "They are bringing in nectar and pollen and have what comb they have
            drawn out
            filled with capped honey, pollen, and uncapped nectar."

            So I would say you can deffinitely quit feeding them artificially, and
            they sound good and healthy and busy.
            There is no need to worry.

            TIFFANY osander@...
            mom, student, massage therapist, beekeeper,
            apprentice fire dancer, cometgoddess
            "Leave a little to nature; she understands her business better than we
            do."
            -Montaigne, Essays, 1595

            ___________________________________________________________________
            You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
            Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
            or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]
          • AlphaBat@xxx.xxx
            OK thanks. Bruce
            Message 5 of 15 , May 25, 1999
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              OK thanks.

              Bruce
            • Bill D
              Can I get some recommendations on Apiaries to purchase Packaged Bees. I m in Memphis TN.
              Message 6 of 15 , Nov 4, 2010
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                Can I get some recommendations on Apiaries to purchase Packaged Bees. I'm in Memphis TN.
              • William
                Arnold Honeybee Service 1-865-693-9381 He sells untreated feral stock in packages and in nucs. Tell him William with All About Bees sent you.
                Message 7 of 15 , Nov 5, 2010
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                  Arnold Honeybee Service 1-865-693-9381 He sells untreated feral stock in packages and in nucs.
                  Tell him William with All About Bees sent you.

                  --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Bill D" <Dickerson888@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Can I get some recommendations on Apiaries to purchase Packaged Bees. I'm in Memphis TN.
                  >
                • jeffbeck_av8r
                  Hi All, I am going into my second year keeping bees. I live in southeast Michigan. I have a hive that has survived this record cold winter. Last year I
                  Message 8 of 15 , Mar 17, 2014
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                    Hi All,

                    I am going into my second year keeping bees. I live in southeast Michigan.  I have a hive that has survived this record cold winter.  Last year I started two packages of bees on nothing but bare foundation.  The mail order package I started in Mid April never did well and died by fall.  The other package, which came on a truckload of bees straight from a bee farm in the beginning of May did well and is the one that survived the winter.  I am getting another package of bees the beginning of this May from the same place.  This year since I have a healthy hive I can take some stuff from (Honey, brood, bee bread),  what and how much should I take from my existing hive to help the new package get started in their hive? If brood is part of that, do I get eggs, capped brood, uncapped brood or some combination? Any other thoughts on getting my next package off to a strong start?

                    Thanks

                    -Jeff Beck

                  • Jorg Kewisch
                    Hi Jeff, you can give your new package bees a boost when you give them a single frame of brood. That is equivalent of an extra 1.5 pounds of bees. You want
                    Message 9 of 15 , Mar 18, 2014
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                      Hi Jeff,
                      you can give your new package bees a boost when you give them a single
                      frame of brood. That is equivalent of an extra 1.5 pounds of bees. You
                      want mostly capped brood and some larvae. The bees will then also feel
                      obligated to care for the brood and it is less likely that they abscond.

                      It is important to feed the package, at least 10 pounds of sugar, to
                      give them a good start.

                      It is often observed that package bees often supersede their queen after
                      a month or two. I assume that in your weak package the queen had a
                      problem but it was not bad enough for immediate action. If your next
                      package does not well replace the queen.

                      Jorg

                      On 03/17/2014 12:50 PM, news@... wrote:
                      > Hi All,
                      >
                      > I am going into my second year keeping bees. I live in southeast
                      > Michigan. I have a hive that has survived this record cold winter.
                      > Last year I started two packages of bees on nothing but bare
                      > foundation. The mail order package I started in Mid April never did
                      > well and died by fall. The other package, which came on a truckload of
                      > bees straight from a bee farm in the beginning of May did well and is
                      > the one that survived the winter. I am getting another package of bees
                      > the beginning of this May from the same place. This year since I have a
                      > healthy hive I can take some stuff from (Honey, brood, bee bread), what
                      > and how much should I take from my existing hive to help the new package
                      > get started in their hive? If brood is part of that, do I get eggs,
                      > capped brood, uncapped brood or some combination? Any other thoughts on
                      > getting my next package off to a strong start?
                      >
                      > Thanks
                      >
                      > -Jeff Beck
                      >
                    • Matt Tucker
                      I might give them a frame or two of honey and pollen if you have any and put them in with some drown out comb and let them have at it. They should do fine.
                      Message 10 of 15 , Mar 18, 2014
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                        I might give them a frame or two of honey and pollen if you have any and put them in with some drown out comb and let them have at it. They should do fine.
                         
                        Matt
                      • billbird2111
                        I did packaged bees once -- but no more. Never again. Nuc transfer is the way to go. The problem is most stores that cater to hobbyists offer a beginner bee
                        Message 11 of 15 , Mar 19, 2014
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                          I did packaged bees once -- but no more. Never again. Nuc transfer is the way to go. The problem is most stores that cater to hobbyists offer a "beginner bee package" for $300 or more. That includes the hive body, an introductory manual on beekeeping and a package of bees, plus a queen.

                          But it's only after you get the beekeeping book home do you realize that nuc transfers are the way to go. By then it's too late.

                          Just replenished both hives this past weekend with nuc transfers. They're doing awesome!

                          Bill
                          Sacramento, CA
                        • Crzy-Pony
                          Every site I have been to locally here are sold out, some nuc s available later but pricy. I like nucs too but money is tight so I will try the pkg again.  
                          Message 12 of 15 , Mar 19, 2014
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                            Every site I have been to locally here are sold out, some nuc's available later but pricy. I like nucs too but money is tight so I will try the pkg again.  
                            Marlene
                            NH


                            On Wednesday, March 19, 2014 4:42 PM, "billbird2111@..." <billbird2111@...> wrote:


                            I did packaged bees once -- but no more. Never again. Nuc transfer is the way to go. The problem is most stores that cater to hobbyists offer a "beginner bee package" for $300 or more. That includes the hive body, an introductory manual on beekeeping and a package of bees, plus a queen.

                            But it's only after you get the beekeeping book home do you realize that nuc transfers are the way to go. By then it's too late.

                            Just replenished both hives this past weekend with nuc transfers. They're doing awesome!

                            Bill
                            Sacramento, CA




                          • mdudley
                            Set out a number of swarm traps, and put you name on local swarm retrieval lists. You will likely get some bees both earlier than you would buying nucs, and
                            Message 13 of 15 , Mar 19, 2014
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                              Set out a number of swarm traps, and put you name on local swarm retrieval lists.  You will likely get some bees both earlier than you would buying nucs, and for free as well.

                              Marshall
                            • Sherill Ryan
                              Make sure to use lemon grass oil and you ll have more success getting swarms. It is cheap online and will last forever. Just a few drops and it is like bee
                              Message 14 of 15 , Mar 19, 2014
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                                Make sure to use lemon grass oil and you'll have more success getting swarms. It is cheap online and will last forever. Just a few drops and it is like bee crack! They love the stuff.


                                On Wednesday, March 19, 2014 9:52 PM, "mdudley@..." <mdudley@...> wrote:
                                 
                                Set out a number of swarm traps, and put you name on local swarm retrieval lists.  You will likely get some bees both earlier than you would buying nucs, and for free as well.

                                Marshall


                              • mdudley
                                You can also find it at health food and nutrition stores. Once you add in shipping, you will likely find buying it locally is less expensive. Marshall ... Make
                                Message 15 of 15 , Mar 21, 2014
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                                  You can also find it at health food and nutrition stores. Once you add in shipping, you will likely find buying it locally is less expensive.

                                  Marshall


                                  ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <sherillynn@...> wrote :

                                  Make sure to use lemon grass oil and you'll have more success getting swarms. It is cheap online and will last forever. Just a few drops and it is like bee crack! They love the stuff.


                                  On Wednesday, March 19, 2014 9:52 PM, "mdudley@..." <mdudley@...> wrote:
                                   
                                  Set out a number of swarm traps, and put you name on local swarm retrieval lists.  You will likely get some bees both earlier than you would buying nucs, and for free as well.

                                  Marshall


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