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Re: Keeping things straight

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  • Tom
    ... possible solution that I have used is vinegar, it kills weeds and is inexpensive and not toxic. Take Care! Tom In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com,
    Message 1 of 16 , May 2, 2004
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      ---Hey guys, Ive been following your post on pesticides/herbicides. A
      possible solution that I have used is vinegar, it kills weeds and is
      inexpensive and not toxic.

      Take Care!
      Tom




      In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "dickbeekeeper" <dickbeekeeper@y...>
      wrote:
      > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Mike <mws@f...> wrote:
      > > Let's keep things straight. Roundup is NOT a pesticide. It is a
      > > herbacide.
      >
      > What?!?! Mike, are your saying a weed is not a pest? <g>
      >
      > Regards,
      > Dick Allen
    • VERONICA THOMPSON
      My husband uses round up in his beeyards so it is safe Roni ... My wife wants to landscape and the guy doing the work is suggesting killing the front yard
      Message 2 of 16 , May 3, 2004
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        My husband uses round up in his beeyards so it is safe



        Roni





        >From: "bdloving" <bdloving@...>
        >Reply-To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        >To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [beekeeping] Roundup and bees
        >Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2004 20:50:21 -0000
        >
      • Shanta McBain
        ... Just because he use it it dose not mean its safe to use. Read the docs on the chemical on the government pages about the chem. Also give the medical mags a
        Message 3 of 16 , May 3, 2004
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          On May 3, 2004 05:58, VERONICA THOMPSON wrote:
          > My husband uses round up in his beeyards so it is safe
          >

          Just because he use it it dose not mean its safe to use. Read the docs on the
          chemical on the government pages about the chem. Also give the medical mags a
          search on the relationship between growth hormones and cancer and tell me
          again this and other commonly use substances such as aspertain and MSG.

          Two point of interest

          There has been a class action suite brought against the producers and major
          users of aspertain. This in timing with Mr Bushes new push to pass a law in
          the US that releases all food manufactures, distributors etc. from financial
          or legal responsibility of additives they put in there products.

          The responsibility for the health of our planet starts and ends with you.

          --
          Thanks
          Shanta McBain
          Bee Breeder
          http://shanta.org/Apis a general view of beekeeping. This is a user
          contributed site. Hosting for your site also can be provided.
          http://shanta.org/ecf The site Eagle Creek Farms: Apis
          Queens, Swarms (Queen and all her bee in your box). Pollination services for
          the Okanagan Corridor BC Canada. Organic operations preferred.
        • Tonci Prnjak
          Every thing we use in fitopharmacy (to influence on guds) is caled pesticide. Tonci ... Tired of spam? Get advanced junk mail protection with MSN 8.
          Message 4 of 16 , May 4, 2004
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            Every thing we use in fitopharmacy (to influence on guds)

            is caled pesticide.

            Tonci

            >From: "dickbeekeeper" <dickbeekeeper@...>
            >Reply-To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
            >To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [beekeeping] Re: Keeping things straight
            >Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 04:23:57 -0000
            >
            >--- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Mike <mws@f...> wrote:
            > > Let's keep things straight.  Roundup is NOT a pesticide.  It is a
            > > herbacide.
            >
            >What?!?! Mike, are your saying a weed is not a pest? <g>
            >
            >Regards,
            >Dick Allen
            >


            Tired of spam? Get advanced junk mail protection with MSN 8.
          • zoodood71
            ... While a zookeeper, I was very vocal against the unnecessary use of chemicals at work. The director of Horticulture insisted that Roundup kills plants by
            Message 5 of 16 , May 5, 2004
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              --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "bdloving" <bdloving@y...> wrote:
              > My wife wants to landscape and the guy doing the work is suggesting
              > killing the front yard weeds with Roundup.
              >
              > Anyone know if this will bother my bees who are in the back yard?

              While a zookeeper, I was very vocal against the unnecessary use of
              chemicals at work. The director of Horticulture insisted that
              Roundup kills plants by causing them to build instable cells (he
              described it as a pile of bolling balls that eventually crashes under
              its own weight and that plants have to be growing for Roundup to be
              effective.) He claimed to have "proven" its safety by drinking some
              in front of the staff (**** I do NOT recommend this action ****).

              That said, and it's all second-hand, I think there are plenty other
              methods for controlling and eliminating vegitation. Soil
              solarization, proper soil prep.... a lot. One needs only to care
              enough to look beyond the chemical shelves of the local market.

              Tom,
              You mentioned vinegar. A wonderful suggestion. I am familiar with
              using it to eradicate plants from areas where you don't want plants
              to grow.... it works by severly altering the soil's pH... but can you
              use it where you Do what other plants to grow?

              WayaCoyote
            • Shanta McBain
              ... Ya had a guy here drinking water from the tailings pond of a local mine. Never did see the fallow up on how long he actualy lived afterwards. The action of
              Message 6 of 16 , May 14, 2004
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                On May 5, 2004 12:23 am, zoodood71 wrote:
                > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "bdloving" <bdloving@y...> wrote:
                > > My wife wants to landscape and the guy doing the work is suggesting
                > > killing the front yard weeds with Roundup.
                > >
                > > Anyone know if this will bother my bees who are in the back yard?
                >
                > While a zookeeper, I was very vocal against the unnecessary use of
                > chemicals at work. The director of Horticulture insisted that
                > Roundup kills plants by causing them to build instable cells (he
                > described it as a pile of bolling balls that eventually crashes under
                > its own weight and that plants have to be growing for Roundup to be
                > effective.) He claimed to have "proven" its safety by drinking some
                > in front of the staff (**** I do NOT recommend this action ****).
                >

                Ya had a guy here drinking water from the tailings pond of a local mine. Never
                did see the fallow up on how long he actualy lived afterwards. The action of
                Roundup/vision is a growth hormone, so strong that it caused the plant to
                grow so fast it dies. In human these chemicals are linked to cancer. If you
                only read the product label you will believe the product is safe.


                > That said, and it's all second-hand, I think there are plenty other
                > methods for controlling and eliminating vegitation. Soil
                > solarization, proper soil prep.... a lot. One needs only to care
                > enough to look beyond the chemical shelves of the local market.

                Short term a bit more work but in the long term better health all around.


                > Tom,
                > You mentioned vinegar. A wonderful suggestion. I am familiar with
                > using it to eradicate plants from areas where you don't want plants
                > to grow.... it works by severly altering the soil's pH... but can you
                > use it where you Do what other plants to grow?

                If the plant is acid talrant it would be save. Blue berries for example like a
                acid soil. In fact we take a one ton truck load of the place each year for
                fire control. I delivered this years load to a pollination contract that I
                have for mulching his blue berries.
              • Keith Benson
                ... So, as far as you know he may have lived longer than most . . . ;) That is the trouble with annectdotes. As to the nitwit that drank roundup, all I can
                Message 7 of 16 , May 14, 2004
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                  Shanta McBain wrote:

                  >On May 5, 2004 12:23 am, zoodood71 wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >>--- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "bdloving" <bdloving@y...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>>My wife wants to landscape and the guy doing the work is suggesting
                  >>>killing the front yard weeds with Roundup.
                  >>>
                  >>>Anyone know if this will bother my bees who are in the back yard?
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>While a zookeeper, I was very vocal against the unnecessary use of
                  >>chemicals at work. The director of Horticulture insisted that
                  >>Roundup kills plants by causing them to build instable cells (he
                  >>described it as a pile of bolling balls that eventually crashes under
                  >>its own weight and that plants have to be growing for Roundup to be
                  >>effective.) He claimed to have "proven" its safety by drinking some
                  >>in front of the staff (**** I do NOT recommend this action ****).
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >Ya had a guy here drinking water from the tailings pond of a local mine. Never
                  >did see the fallow up on how long he actualy lived afterwards.
                  >
                  So, as far as you know he may have lived longer than most . . . ;) That
                  is the trouble with annectdotes. As to the nitwit that drank roundup,
                  all I can do is shake my head. Some people do the dumbest thing to
                  prove their point. That someone had promoted this individual to a
                  director level position is even scarier. OF courset this report is
                  third hand - he may have done no such thing.

                  > The action of
                  >Roundup/vision is a growth hormone,
                  >
                  Nope

                  > so strong that it caused the plant to
                  >grow so fast it dies.
                  >
                  Not at all. There are some herbicides that so this, but glyphosate is
                  not one of them, it *inhibits* an enzyme found only in plants. In
                  essence it derails protein synthesis. Please see.
                  http://home.howstuffworks.com/question357.htm

                  > In human these chemicals are linked to cancer.
                  >
                  There is considerable scientific debate over the veracity of these
                  claims. One of the most widely touted "studies" suggesting a link
                  between glyphosate and cancer had 4 subjects and 3 controls. GUess what
                  morst scientists thing of a study were n=4. Works for people who like
                  annectdotes, but not for people who like data. It very well might be a
                  carcinogen . . . . or it may not, depends on who you read and what axe
                  they are grinding.

                  > If you
                  >only read the product label you will believe the product is safe.
                  >
                  True of many things. Don't beleive everything you read - particularly
                  on the internet


                  Keith
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