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Re: New to beekeeping

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  • karaho@aol.com
    On my state s agricultural station s web site is a list of registered beekeepers,
    Message 1 of 23 , Mar 21, 2004
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      << You would probably be surprised how many are in you area. Keep looking >>

      On my state's agricultural station's web site is a list of registered
      beekeepers, by town. I found several within blocks of my home (and know of others
      that aren't on the list). Perhaps there is something like it where you live, too.

      Nancy
    • Mandy Farrar
      Hi there- I just got my first nuc (Carolinians) about 3 weeks ago. I am having a lot of fun and am learning a bunch. I have gone to the hive weekly (OK I go
      Message 2 of 23 , Jun 20, 2007
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        Hi there-

        I just got my first nuc (Carolinians) about 3 weeks ago. I am having
        a lot of fun and am learning a bunch.

        I have gone to the hive weekly (OK I go everyday and watch them, but
        only open it up and pull out frames once a week)- but was not sure
        how long it generally takes before the bees get the new frames drawn
        out in the first deep. I am going often because I am new and
        trying to gain confidence, I hope this isn't disturbing them too
        much.

        I have been feeding sugar water with a top feeder and since I am a
        newbie - I THINK all looks good, but to me it seems they are slow to
        build on the new frames (but what do I know?) Also, I am thinking of
        taking the entrance reducer off this week - how strong should the
        colony be before I do that? 6 of 10 frames full?

        Thanks,

        Mandy
        Caratunk, ME
      • Steve B
        Hi Mandy, welcome. Really need more information to comment. Depends on how strong the nuc was, do you have new foundation sheets in the frames? Where are you?
        Message 3 of 23 , Jun 20, 2007
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          Hi Mandy, welcome.
           
           
          Really need more information to comment. Depends on how strong the nuc was, do you have new foundation sheets in the frames? Where are you? Is there a honey flow on etc. Deeps or medium bodies?
           
          Peeking in from the top you can look down through the frames and get an idea of how they are doing.
           
          I would add another box when they have 8 of 10 frames drawn or mostly drawn. If the nuc was a five frame that would be pretty soon in your case(guessing big time). It is better to add the box too early than too late.
           
          Staying ahead of them is what you want to do. If I see they jump on the foundation after being hived and are drawing it out heavily I get ready to add another box. This may be within a week of starting. If it takes a week or so for them to start drawing and making only slow progress, I will delay setting the second(or third) box until they have most of the box drawn.
           
          They need time to set up the hive like they want before they are near finishing the bottom box. Once they precieve they have a space problem, or not enough room, adding the top box may not(won't) help.
           
          Ask others about the feeding also. During honey season they make pack most of that new pretty comb slap full of feed.
           
          All beekeeping is local and talking to others from your area is the best way for a new beek to learn what to expect.
           
          Welcome and good luck.
           

          Mandy Farrar <manfarr1974@...> wrote:
          Hi there-

          I just got my first nuc (Carolinians) about 3 weeks ago. I am having
          a lot of fun and am learning a bunch.

          I have gone to the hive weekly (OK I go everyday and watch them, but
          only open it up and pull out frames once a week)- but was not sure
          how long it generally takes before the bees get the new frames drawn
          out in the first deep. I am going often because I am new and
          trying to gain confidence, I hope this isn't disturbing them too
          much.

          I have been feeding sugar water with a top feeder and since I am a
          newbie - I THINK all looks good, but to me it seems they are slow to
          build on the new frames (but what do I know?) Also, I am thinking of
          taking the entrance reducer off this week - how strong should the
          colony be before I do that? 6 of 10 frames full?

          Thanks,

          Mandy
          Caratunk, ME




          Steve Broussard
          Zachary Farms LLC
          Latitude 30.66
          Honey bees, Bee Removal, Pollination Hives
        • Mandy
          Thanks a bunch- I had a 4-frame nuc and it seemed pretty strong, and I am using deeps. I am in northwestern Maine. They don t seem to be taking to the new
          Message 4 of 23 , Jun 20, 2007
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            Thanks a bunch-

             

            I had a 4-frame nuc and it seemed pretty strong, and I am using deeps.  I am in northwestern Maine .  They don’t seem to be taking to the new foundation – slow progress.  They are crawling all over the empty frames/foundation though.  I am sure I am over thinking it and being impatient.  I now wish I had gotten two nucs to start so I could compare. 

             

            The guy I got them from told me to keep feeding sugar syrup as it would help them build the foundation more quickly – but maybe I will take it away this weekend so they do not pack those cells full of feed, I never thought of that.

             

            Thanks so much for your help,

             

            Mandy

             


            From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steve B
            Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2007 9:40 AM
            To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping

             

            Hi Mandy, welcome.

             

             

            Really need more information to comment. Depends on how strong the nuc was, do you have new foundation sheets in the frames? Where are you? Is there a honey flow on etc. Deeps or medium bodies?

             

            Peeking in from the top you can look down through the frames and get an idea of how they are doing.

             

            I would add another box when they have 8 of 10 frames drawn or mostly drawn. If the nuc was a five frame that would be pretty soon in your case(guessing big time). It is better to add the box too early than too late.

             

            Staying ahead of them is what you want to do. If I see they jump on the foundation after being hived and are drawing it out heavily I get ready to add another box. This may be within a week of starting. If it takes a week or so for them to start drawing and making only slow progress, I will delay setting the second(or third) box until they have most of the box drawn.

             

            They need time to set up the hive like they want before they are near finishing the bottom box. Once they precieve they have a space problem, or not enough room, adding the top box may not(won't) help.

             

            Ask others about the feeding also. During honey season they make pack most of that new pretty comb slap full of feed.

             

            All beekeeping is local and talking to others from your area is the best way for a new beek to learn what to expect.

             

            Welcome and good luck.

             


            Mandy Farrar <manfarr1974@ yahoo.com> wrote:

            Hi there-

            I just got my first nuc (Carolinians) about 3 weeks ago. I am having
            a lot of fun and am learning a bunch.

            I have gone to the hive weekly (OK I go everyday and watch them, but
            only open it up and pull out frames once a week)- but was not sure
            how long it generally takes before the bees get the new frames drawn
            out in the first deep. I am going often because I am new and
            trying to gain confidence, I hope this isn't disturbing them too
            much.

            I have been feeding sugar water with a top feeder and since I am a
            newbie - I THINK all looks good, but to me it seems they are slow to
            build on the new frames (but what do I know?) Also, I am thinking of
            taking the entrance reducer off this week - how strong should the
            colony be before I do that? 6 of 10 frames full?

            Thanks,

            Mandy
            Caratunk , ME



            Steve Broussard

            Zachary Farms LLC

            Latitude 30.66

            Honey bees, Bee Removal, Pollination Hives

          • Steve B
            Are they drawing any at all? There should be patches(small mounds of new comb) near the upper center of the foundation. Look at the frame next to the nuc
            Message 5 of 23 , Jun 20, 2007
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              Are they drawing any at all? There should be patches(small mounds of new comb) near the upper center of the foundation. Look at the frame next to the nuc frames on the side facing the brood nest.
               
              Are they taking the syurp?
               
              The guy told you correctly on feeding syrup, continue to feed them. If they store some of it they can use it just like honey this winter. Better to feed them if you want maximum build-up. Just be sure to get that second box to them before they need it.
               
              I would keep feed in front of them 24/7 until they have the second box almost finished drawing out.
               
              You really should seek advice from beeks with northen experience as to how long to feed them and preparations for overwintering.
               
              Sounds like you are just where you should be after three weeks.
               
              Get to know your bees but let them do their thing until they get established.
               
              This is great fun huh?
               
               
               
               

              Mandy <mfarrar@...> wrote:
              Thanks a bunch-
              I had a 4-frame nuc and it seemed pretty strong, and I am using deeps.  I am in northwestern Maine .  They don’t seem to be taking to the new foundation – slow progress.  They are crawling all over the empty frames/foundation though.  I am sure I am over thinking it and being impatient.  I now wish I had gotten two nucs to start so I could compare. 
              The guy I got them from told me to keep feeding sugar syrup as it would help them build the foundation more quickly – but maybe I will take it away this weekend so they do not pack those cells full of feed, I never thought of that.
              Thanks so much for your help,
              Mandy

              From: beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com [mailto:beekeeping@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Steve B
              Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2007 9:40 AM
              To: beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com
              Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping
              Hi Mandy, welcome.
              Really need more information to comment. Depends on how strong the nuc was, do you have new foundation sheets in the frames? Where are you? Is there a honey flow on etc. Deeps or medium bodies?
              Peeking in from the top you can look down through the frames and get an idea of how they are doing.
              I would add another box when they have 8 of 10 frames drawn or mostly drawn. If the nuc was a five frame that would be pretty soon in your case(guessing big time). It is better to add the box too early than too late.
              Staying ahead of them is what you want to do. If I see they jump on the foundation after being hived and are drawing it out heavily I get ready to add another box. This may be within a week of starting. If it takes a week or so for them to start drawing and making only slow progress, I will delay setting the second(or third) box until they have most of the box drawn.
              They need time to set up the hive like they want before they are near finishing the bottom box. Once they precieve they have a space problem, or not enough room, adding the top box may not(won't) help.
              Ask others about the feeding also. During honey season they make pack most of that new pretty comb slap full of feed.
              All beekeeping is local and talking to others from your area is the best way for a new beek to learn what to expect.
              Welcome and good luck.

              Mandy Farrar <manfarr1974@ yahoo.com> wrote:
              Hi there-

              I just got my first nuc (Carolinians) about 3 weeks ago. I am having
              a lot of fun and am learning a bunch.

              I have gone to the hive weekly (OK I go everyday and watch them, but
              only open it up and pull out frames once a week)- but was not sure
              how long it generally takes before the bees get the new frames drawn
              out in the first deep. I am going often because I am new and
              trying to gain confidence, I hope this isn't disturbing them too
              much.

              I have been feeding sugar water with a top feeder and since I am a
              newbie - I THINK all looks good, but to me it seems they are slow to
              build on the new frames (but what do I know?) Also, I am thinking of
              taking the entrance reducer off this week - how strong should the
              colony be before I do that? 6 of 10 frames full?

              Thanks,

              Mandy
              Caratunk , ME


              Steve Broussard
              Zachary Farms LLC
              Latitude 30.66
              Honey bees, Bee Removal, Pollination Hives



              Steve Broussard
              Zachary Farms LLC
              Latitude 30.66
              Honey bees, Bee Removal, Pollination Hives
            • Mandy
              Oh yes so much fun! I really wish I had gotten two nucs.They are drawing a little on the cells near the nuc frames, not as much as I expected though. They are
              Message 6 of 23 , Jun 20, 2007
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                Oh yes so much fun!  I really wish I had gotten two nucs…They are drawing a little on the cells near the nuc frames, not as much as I expected though.  They are taking the syrup readily.

                 

                The beekeepers got them from live an hour south of me, I will ask them for more information on overwintering.  Given where I live, I am going to have to leave them 1 honey super I think.  Also I know of someone just north of me who over wintered his bees and they didn’t do so great so I will find out what he did so I don’t make the same mistakes.

                 

                Love your website by the way, great pictures & stories.

                 

                Thanks again for your help.

                 

                Mandy

                 


                From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steve B
                Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2007 2:48 PM
                To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping

                 

                Are they drawing any at all? There should be patches(small mounds of new comb) near the upper center of the foundation. Look at the frame next to the nuc frames on the side facing the brood nest.

                 

                Are they taking the syurp?

                 

                The guy told you correctly on feeding syrup, continue to feed them. If they store some of it they can use it just like honey this winter. Better to feed them if you want maximum build-up. Just be sure to get that second box to them before they need it.

                 

                I would keep feed in front of them 24/7 until they have the second box almost finished drawing out.

                 

                You really should seek advice from beeks with northen experience as to how long to feed them and preparations for overwintering.

                 

                Sounds like you are just where you should be after three weeks.

                 

                Get to know your bees but let them do their thing until they get established.

                 

                This is great fun huh?

                 

                 

                 

                 


                Mandy <mfarrar@oriontimber lands.com> wrote:

                Thanks a bunch-

                I had a 4-frame nuc and it seemed pretty strong, and I am using deeps.  I am in northwestern Maine .  They don’t seem to be taking to the new foundation – slow progress.  They are crawling all over the empty frames/foundation though.  I am sure I am over thinking it and being impatient.  I now wish I had gotten two nucs to start so I could compare. 

                The guy I got them from told me to keep feeding sugar syrup as it would help them build the foundation more quickly – but maybe I will take it away this weekend so they do not pack those cells full of feed, I never thought of that.

                Thanks so much for your help,

                Mandy


                From: beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com [mailto:beekeeping@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Steve B
                Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2007 9:40 AM
                To: beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com
                Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping

                Hi Mandy, welcome.

                Really need more information to comment. Depends on how strong the nuc was, do you have new foundation sheets in the frames? Where are you? Is there a honey flow on etc. Deeps or medium bodies?

                Peeking in from the top you can look down through the frames and get an idea of how they are doing.

                I would add another box when they have 8 of 10 frames drawn or mostly drawn. If the nuc was a five frame that would be pretty soon in your case(guessing big time). It is better to add the box too early than too late.

                Staying ahead of them is what you want to do. If I see they jump on the foundation after being hived and are drawing it out heavily I get ready to add another box. This may be within a week of starting. If it takes a week or so for them to start drawing and making only slow progress, I will delay setting the second(or third) box until they have most of the box drawn.

                They need time to set up the hive like they want before they are near finishing the bottom box. Once they precieve they have a space problem, or not enough room, adding the top box may not(won't) help.

                Ask others about the feeding also. During honey season they make pack most of that new pretty comb slap full of feed.

                All beekeeping is local and talking to others from your area is the best way for a new beek to learn what to expect.

                Welcome and good luck.


                Mandy Farrar <manfarr1974@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                Hi there-

                I just got my first nuc (Carolinians) about 3 weeks ago. I am having
                a lot of fun and am learning a bunch.

                I have gone to the hive weekly (OK I go everyday and watch them, but
                only open it up and pull out frames once a week)- but was not sure
                how long it generally takes before the bees get the new frames drawn
                out in the first deep. I am going often because I am new and
                trying to gain confidence, I hope this isn't disturbing them too
                much.

                I have been feeding sugar water with a top feeder and since I am a
                newbie - I THINK all looks good, but to me it seems they are slow to
                build on the new frames (but what do I know?) Also, I am thinking of
                taking the entrance reducer off this week - how strong should the
                colony be before I do that? 6 of 10 frames full?

                Thanks,

                Mandy
                Caratunk , ME




                Steve Broussard

                Zachary Farms LLC

                Latitude 30.66

                Honey bees, Bee Removal, Pollination Hives



                Steve Broussard

                Zachary Farms LLC

                Latitude 30.66

                Honey bees, Bee Removal, Pollination Hives

              • Mike Stoops
                Mandy wrote: The guy I got them from told me to keep feeding sugar syrup as it would help them build the foundation
                Message 7 of 23 , Jun 20, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Mandy <mfarrar@...> wrote:
                  The guy I got them from told me to keep feeding sugar syrup as it would help them build the foundation more quickly – but maybe I will take it away this weekend so they do not pack those cells full of feed, I never thought of that.
                  Mandy
                  Mandy,
                       Expanding from a NUC into a full ten frame hive do not stop feeding syrup.  As long as the bees will take it, feed it.  Where you live you need to have those bees in two complete hive bodies by mid fall with all of the second (top) hive body full and capped and a good deal of capped honey to the sides and over the bell shaped curve of brood.  Until you get two hive bodies with frames drawn and at least partially filled and capped, don't stop feeding syrup.  If there is a honey flow on, they will probably ignore the syrup, but when the flow is over, have back there for them.
                   
                  Mike in LA
                  .



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                • Steve B
                  Check this out. http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=1034359218351707050&q=City+of+the+Bees Mandy wrote: Oh yes so much fun!
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jun 20, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Check this out.
                    Oh yes so much fun!  I really wish I had gotten two nucs…They are drawing a little on the cells near the nuc frames, not as much as I expected though.  They are taking the syrup readily.
                    The beekeepers got them from live an hour south of me, I will ask them for more information on overwintering.  Given where I live, I am going to have to leave them 1 honey super I think.  Also I know of someone just north of me who over wintered his bees and they didn’t do so great so I will find out what he did so I don’t make the same mistakes.
                    Love your website by the way, great pictures & stories.
                    Thanks again for your help.
                    Mandy

                    From: beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com [mailto:beekeeping@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Steve B
                    Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2007 2:48 PM
                    To: beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com
                    Subject: RE: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping
                    Are they drawing any at all? There should be patches(small mounds of new comb) near the upper center of the foundation. Look at the frame next to the nuc frames on the side facing the brood nest.
                    Are they taking the syurp?
                    The guy told you correctly on feeding syrup, continue to feed them. If they store some of it they can use it just like honey this winter. Better to feed them if you want maximum build-up. Just be sure to get that second box to them before they need it.
                    I would keep feed in front of them 24/7 until they have the second box almost finished drawing out.
                    You really should seek advice from beeks with northen experience as to how long to feed them and preparations for overwintering.
                    Sounds like you are just where you should be after three weeks.
                    Get to know your bees but let them do their thing until they get established.
                    This is great fun huh?

                    Mandy <mfarrar@oriontimber lands.com> wrote:
                    Thanks a bunch-
                    I had a 4-frame nuc and it seemed pretty strong, and I am using deeps.  I am in northwestern Maine .  They don’t seem to be taking to the new foundation – slow progress.  They are crawling all over the empty frames/foundation though.  I am sure I am over thinking it and being impatient.  I now wish I had gotten two nucs to start so I could compare. 
                    The guy I got them from told me to keep feeding sugar syrup as it would help them build the foundation more quickly – but maybe I will take it away this weekend so they do not pack those cells full of feed, I never thought of that.
                    Thanks so much for your help,
                    Mandy

                    From: beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com [mailto:beekeeping@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Steve B
                    Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2007 9:40 AM
                    To: beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com
                    Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping
                    Hi Mandy, welcome.
                    Really need more information to comment. Depends on how strong the nuc was, do you have new foundation sheets in the frames? Where are you? Is there a honey flow on etc. Deeps or medium bodies?
                    Peeking in from the top you can look down through the frames and get an idea of how they are doing.
                    I would add another box when they have 8 of 10 frames drawn or mostly drawn. If the nuc was a five frame that would be pretty soon in your case(guessing big time). It is better to add the box too early than too late.
                    Staying ahead of them is what you want to do. If I see they jump on the foundation after being hived and are drawing it out heavily I get ready to add another box. This may be within a week of starting. If it takes a week or so for them to start drawing and making only slow progress, I will delay setting the second(or third) box until they have most of the box drawn.
                    They need time to set up the hive like they want before they are near finishing the bottom box. Once they precieve they have a space problem, or not enough room, adding the top box may not(won't) help.
                    Ask others about the feeding also. During honey season they make pack most of that new pretty comb slap full of feed.
                    All beekeeping is local and talking to others from your area is the best way for a new beek to learn what to expect.
                    Welcome and good luck.

                    Mandy Farrar <manfarr1974@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                    Hi there-

                    I just got my first nuc (Carolinians) about 3 weeks ago. I am having
                    a lot of fun and am learning a bunch.

                    I have gone to the hive weekly (OK I go everyday and watch them, but
                    only open it up and pull out frames once a week)- but was not sure
                    how long it generally takes before the bees get the new frames drawn
                    out in the first deep. I am going often because I am new and
                    trying to gain confidence, I hope this isn't disturbing them too
                    much.

                    I have been feeding sugar water with a top feeder and since I am a
                    newbie - I THINK all looks good, but to me it seems they are slow to
                    build on the new frames (but what do I know?) Also, I am thinking of
                    taking the entrance reducer off this week - how strong should the
                    colony be before I do that? 6 of 10 frames full?

                    Thanks,

                    Mandy
                    Caratunk , ME



                    Steve Broussard
                    Zachary Farms LLC
                    Latitude 30.66
                    Honey bees, Bee Removal, Pollination Hives


                    Steve Broussard
                    Zachary Farms LLC
                    Latitude 30.66
                    Honey bees, Bee Removal, Pollination Hives



                    Steve Broussard
                    Zachary Farms LLC
                    Latitude 30.66
                    Honey bees, Bee Removal, Pollination Hives
                  • axeman axeman
                    Wow, is this thing old! No offense to any here... I actually really enjoyed this video and learned a whole bunch of new things. Next time I m trying to fly a
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jun 21, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Wow, is this thing old! No offense to any here...
                      I actually really enjoyed this video and learned a
                      whole bunch of new things. Next time I'm trying to
                      'fly' a bee I find on the ground not far from my hive
                      I'll giver her a boost of sugar water. I'll keep a
                      pipet handy...I'm kinda like that. The video shot
                      inside the hive were amazing. My wife even enjoyed it.
                      I'm going to pass this link around to my family and
                      friends. They think I'm crazy for keeping bees...silly
                      them.
                      Thanks for the link.

                      Alan, Lakeview, NY

                      --- Steve B <greenriverya@...> wrote:

                      > Check this out.
                      >
                      >
                      http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=1034359218351707050&q=City+of+the+Bees
                      >




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                    • Elizabeth Bossert
                      Hi, I live in Southeastern Idaho and am just starting my first hive this coming spring. I have read a few books, assembled my hive yesterday, and am very
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jan 2, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi,
                         
                        I live in Southeastern Idaho and am just starting my first hive this coming spring.  I have read a few books, assembled my hive yesterday, and am very excited about this adventure ahead.
                         
                        Of course, it will probably be a few years before I have honey enough to market.  One thing I haven't heard much about is FDA regulations regarding honey.   Are there any regulations or guidelines for those who wish to sell honey?   I will probably just market locally--at the farmer's market here in town, for example.
                         
                        I have enjoyed reading the posts.  You all seem to be good, down-to-earth people.
                         
                        Elizabeth


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                      • Mike Stoops
                        Elizabeth Bossert wrote:I live in Southeastern Idaho and am just starting my first hive this coming spring. I have read a few
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jan 3, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Elizabeth Bossert <bossertelizabeth@...> wrote:
                          I live in Southeastern Idaho and am just starting my first hive this coming spring.  I have read a few books, assembled my hive yesterday, and am very excited about this adventure ahead.
                           
                          One thing I haven't heard much about is FDA regulations regarding honey.   Are there any regulations or guidelines for those who wish to sell honey?   I will probably just market locally--at the farmer's market here in town, for example.

                          Elizabeth

                          Elizabeth, a few recommendations.

                          1.  Start with at least two hives.  If you only have one hive and you have problems with it, you are sunk.  With two hives you can use the resources of one to help out the other.

                          2.  Go to your county extension office and see if they can't direct you to a local beekeeper's club.  If there are none available I'm sure they can direct you to some local beekeepers.  Most hobbyest beekeepers love to help out others just getting started.  The longed your mentor has been into beekeeping, the better information you'll get that pertains to your local region.

                          3.  Read.  Read.  Read.  If you can afford it, subscribe to the "American Bee Journal" and/or "Gleanings" <in bee culture>

                          4.  In Alabama, to sell at farmer's markets we get what is called a "Grower's Permit".  This allows us to personally sell our honey with having to get a business license or a vender's license.

                          5.  Keep asking questions.  There's only one dumb question, and that's the one that isn't asked.

                          Good luck in your new venture and keep us posted as to how it is going.

                          Mike in LA  (Lower Alabama)


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                        • sherill lockwood
                          Welcome to the addictive hobby of beekeeping. If you can swing it, I would suggest that you start with at least two hives so you have a comparison. I know
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jan 4, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Welcome to the addictive hobby of beekeeping. If you
                            can swing it, I would suggest that you start with at
                            least two hives so you have a comparison.

                            I know you'll enjoy yourself and this group has been
                            so supportive and informative with all of our
                            "newbees!"
                            --- Elizabeth Bossert <bossertelizabeth@...>
                            wrote:

                            > Hi,
                            >
                            > I live in Southeastern Idaho and am just starting
                            > my first hive this coming spring. I have read a few
                            > books, assembled my hive yesterday, and am very
                            > excited about this adventure ahead.
                            >
                            > Of course, it will probably be a few years before
                            > I have honey enough to market. One thing I haven't
                            > heard much about is FDA regulations regarding honey.
                            > Are there any regulations or guidelines for those
                            > who wish to sell honey? I will probably just
                            > market locally--at the farmer's market here in town,
                            > for example.
                            >
                            > I have enjoyed reading the posts. You all seem to
                            > be good, down-to-earth people.
                            >
                            > Elizabeth
                            >
                            >
                            > ---------------------------------
                            > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
                          • jason rapsis
                            Ditto with the second hive. Beekeeping for Dummies has a nice description of what is required for selling honey, among tons of other advice. J.
                            Message 13 of 23 , Jan 6, 2008
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                              Ditto with the second hive. "Beekeeping for Dummies" has a nice
                              description of what is required for selling honey, among tons of other
                              advice. J.
                            • jason rapsis
                              Ditto on the second hive. Beekeeping for Dummies has a good section on what to do for marketing honey. J.
                              Message 14 of 23 , Jan 6, 2008
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Ditto on the second hive. "Beekeeping for Dummies" has a good
                                section on what to do for marketing honey. J.
                                > > Hi,
                                > >
                                > > I live in Southeastern Idaho and am just starting
                                > > my first hive this coming spring. I have read a few
                                > > books, assembled my hive yesterday, and am very
                                > > excited about this adventure ahead.
                                > >
                                > > Of course, it will probably be a few years before
                                > > I have honey enough to market. One thing I haven't
                                > > heard much about is FDA regulations regarding honey.
                                > > Are there any regulations or guidelines for those
                                > > who wish to sell honey? I will probably just
                                > > market locally--at the farmer's market here in town,
                                > > for example.
                                > >
                                > > I have enjoyed reading the posts. You all seem to
                                > > be good, down-to-earth people.
                                > >
                                > > Elizabeth
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > ---------------------------------
                                > > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
                                >
                              • sklhoste
                                I am thinking of starting a hive next spring. However, I have dogs and I am not sure having a hive is safe for my pets. The hive would have to go in my back
                                Message 15 of 23 , Aug 26, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  I am thinking of starting a hive next spring. However, I have dogs and I am not sure having a hive is safe for my pets. The hive would have to go in my back yard where the dogs have access. I was thinking of elevating the hive for safety. My dogs are all very small. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
                                • Martin
                                  I have dogs and cats and bees - no problem. They may look, but dogs naturally understand to stay away from bees anyway. God Bless, Martin
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Nov 2, 2009
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                                    I have dogs and cats and bees - no problem.
                                    They may look, but dogs naturally understand to stay away from bees anyway.
                                    God Bless,
                                    Martin

                                    --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "sklhoste" <slhoste@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I am thinking of starting a hive next spring. However, I have dogs and I am not sure having a hive is safe for my pets. The hive would have to go in my back yard where the dogs have access. I was thinking of elevating the hive for safety. My dogs are all very small. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
                                    >
                                  • Peggy Willenberg
                                    I doubt the dogs would have any interest. My cats and dogs ignore the hives. But if they got too curious, one sting on the nose would take care of it. ...
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Nov 2, 2009
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      I doubt the dogs would have any interest. My cats and dogs ignore the
                                      hives. But if they got too curious, one sting on the nose would take care
                                      of it.
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: "Martin" <mrgutzmer@...>
                                      To: <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
                                      Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 6:24 PM
                                      Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: New to beekeeping


                                      >I have dogs and cats and bees - no problem.
                                      > They may look, but dogs naturally understand to stay away from bees
                                      > anyway.
                                      > God Bless,
                                      > Martin
                                      >
                                      > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "sklhoste" <slhoste@...> wrote:
                                      >>
                                      >> I am thinking of starting a hive next spring. However, I have dogs and I
                                      >> am not sure having a hive is safe for my pets. The hive would have to go
                                      >> in my back yard where the dogs have access. I was thinking of elevating
                                      >> the hive for safety. My dogs are all very small. Any help would be
                                      >> appreciated. Thanks
                                      >>
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ------------------------------------
                                      >
                                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                    • Stephen Epstein
                                      Our dog likes to try and capture flies with her mouth. The first time we took her to the bee yard she learned that bees are not flies. Now whenever she joins
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Nov 2, 2009
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                                        Our dog likes to try and capture flies with her mouth. The first time we took her to the bee yard she learned that bees are not flies. Now whenever she joins us, she ignores the bees.

                                         

                                        Stephen Epstein

                                        www.bigdipperphotos.com

                                         

                                         


                                        From: Martin [mailto:mrgutzmer@...]
                                        Sent: Tuesday, November 03, 2009 2:25 AM
                                        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: New to beekeeping

                                         

                                         

                                        I have dogs and cats and bees - no problem.
                                        They may look, but dogs naturally understand to stay away from bees anyway.
                                        God Bless,
                                        Martin

                                        --- In Beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com, "sklhoste" <slhoste@... > wrote:

                                        >
                                        > I am thinking of starting a hive next spring. However, I have dogs and I
                                        am not sure having a hive is safe for my pets. The hive would have to go in my back yard where the dogs have access. I was thinking of elevating the hive for safety. My dogs are all very small. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
                                        >

                                      • Bill
                                        The owner of the beekeeping supply place where I purchased my first hive last spring had an interesting story to relate regarding dogs and bees. He had one
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Nov 3, 2009
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                                          The owner of the beekeeping supply place where I purchased my first hive last spring had an interesting story to relate regarding dogs and bees. He had one that loved to chomp on bees as they flew by -- probably because they were sweet with honey and the dog had a sweet tooth. But the dog did have an allergic reaction -- and his snout would swell up like a balloon every time he got stung.

                                          That didn't stop that dog from chomping away over the course of a 20 year lifetime. They always knew when a bee had delivered a sting, because Fido would suddenly have a case of "Balloon Mouth." It didn't stop that dog. Bees beware the dog with a sweet tooth!

                                          Personally? I have four cats in the backyard. They're always hopping on top of the hive, or playing in front of it. They stay away from the area once they get stung -- but they forget about it a few days later and cat horseplay in front of the hive continues.

                                          Pets and a hive go hand-in-hand. I haven't noticed any problems.

                                          Bill
                                          Sacramento, CA

                                          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "sklhoste" <slhoste@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I am thinking of starting a hive next spring. However, I have dogs and I am not sure having a hive is safe for my pets. The hive would have to go in my back yard where the dogs have access. I was thinking of elevating the hive for safety. My dogs are all very small. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
                                          >
                                        • glass71909
                                          I m so excited! Next week, an experienced bee keeper is bringing out bees. He also removes africanized bees, so has lost some of his hives, which he thinks
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Mar 13, 2013
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                                            I'm so excited! Next week, an experienced bee keeper is bringing out bees. He also removes africanized bees, so has lost some of his hives, which he thinks is due to chemicals left on his truck, so he's bringing out more hives than I eventually want.

                                            I don't mind that as, he's going to give me a great deal. I know I will need to feed them, but would like some advice on what flowers to put out that will help them. I have some fruit trees and roses, and plan on nasturiums. Wisteria will start now and there's clover. It's still cool here, so I'm putting more clover and vetch seed in the pasture. There's no other bees in the area, so they will have neighbors to forage on, too.

                                            I have a large pond, so they have an adequate water source.

                                            Thanks,
                                            Ann
                                          • Kewisch, Jorg
                                            Ann, The bees fly up to two miles away from the hive and visit 2 million flowers for 1 pound of honey. So it will not make a big difference what you plant
                                            Message 21 of 23 , Mar 13, 2013
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                                              Ann,

                                              The bees fly up to two miles away from the hive and visit 2 million flowers for 1 pound of honey. So it will not make a big difference what you plant in your yard. Something that blooms early is always good.
                                              "feeding the bees" usually means to give them sugar syrup.
                                              Check with your local beekeeping club if they have classes, not only for the learning but also for the people you will meet.

                                              Jorg
                                              ________________________________________
                                              From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of glass71909 [glass71909@...]
                                              Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 2:47 PM
                                              To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                                              Subject: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping

                                              I'm so excited! Next week, an experienced bee keeper is bringing out bees. He also removes africanized bees, so has lost some of his hives, which he thinks is due to chemicals left on his truck, so he's bringing out more hives than I eventually want.

                                              I don't mind that as, he's going to give me a great deal. I know I will need to feed them, but would like some advice on what flowers to put out that will help them. I have some fruit trees and roses, and plan on nasturiums. Wisteria will start now and there's clover. It's still cool here, so I'm putting more clover and vetch seed in the pasture. There's no other bees in the area, so they will have neighbors to forage on, too.

                                              I have a large pond, so they have an adequate water source.

                                              Thanks,
                                              Ann
                                            • Mike S
                                              ... Normally speaking, you won t be able to plant enough flowers to really help feed the bees.  If you had a couple of acres of say, Dutch clover, crimson
                                              Message 22 of 23 , Mar 14, 2013
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                                                >>>    would like some advice on what flowers to put out that will help them.   (Help feed the bees)

                                                Normally speaking, you won't be able to plant enough flowers to really help feed the bees.  If you had a couple of acres of say, Dutch clover, crimson clover, sunflowers; then that might help.  But even for one colony, it's difficult for a person to plant enough flowers to make a significant difference.   One consideration, however, would be to plant all your roadsides within a two mile radius with one or both of the clovers mentioned above.  Hairy vetch would also work well in that respect.  That would be a couple of hundred pounds of seed.  BTW, you didn't mention your location and that makes a difference as well.  The clovers mentioned above will work just all over the U.S., just about.  Won't work in all areas.  Sweet clover will work in the northern parts of the U.S.  Check with your county extension agent.  Will conclude by saying it's hard to plant enough flowers to really make a difference for bees unless you undertake mass plantings.   Good luck.

                                                Mike in LA

                                              • karon
                                                If he wants to kill the Africanized without chemicals, tell him to try just soapy water. I have used it for years with bees hanging around the location of a
                                                Message 23 of 23 , Mar 16, 2013
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                                                  If he wants to kill the Africanized without chemicals, tell him to try just soapy water. I have used it for years with bees hanging around the location of a moved hive and killing off Fire Ants.

                                                   

                                                  All you need is a store brand dishwashing liquid. The kind for hand washing. For every gallon of water, use one cup of the dish washing liquid. Mix gently to avoid suds. Then, for Africanized bees, you can simply put the mixture in a garden sprayer and spray the hive. The mix kills the bees or fire ants on contact. It does not harm the surrounding vegetation or wild life (other than insects)

                                                   

                                                  This stuff acts on the insect’s exoskeleton like sulfuric acid does on skin.  I really didn’t believe it when I first heard about it. I started using it to kill Fire Ants when I lived in Atlanta.  By the end of the first season, I was astonished at how well it worked!

                                                   

                                                  In a neighborhood where everyone had multiple mounds of ants, we had a clear yard. No one in the area could believe it was as simple as it was. Many would not even try, thinking we simply had some secret method and were keeping it to ourselves. No one could think it was so easy. and yet, it was.

                                                   

                                                  Obviously, when going after Africanized bees, you want to be certain you are well suited but, this really does work. Might need much more for a hive and you’ll have to get it deeply into the hive. But, it can work and it will do less damage to the surrounding area, overall.

                                                   

                                                  I have never dealt with Africanized bees, myself, but I would definitely try this on them if I did. I have used it on Fire Ants and it worked beautifully. It may be worth a try. He’ll know for certain if he wants to try it. but, if it works, it will be much less expensive and better for the surroundings and his other hives, that so many chemicals.

                                                   

                                                  Karon Adams

                                                  Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

                                                  You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

                                                  www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

                                                  www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

                                                   

                                                  From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of glass71909
                                                  Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 2:47 PM
                                                  To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Subject: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping

                                                   

                                                   

                                                  I'm so excited! Next week, an experienced bee keeper is bringing out bees. He also removes africanized bees, so has lost some of his hives, which he thinks is due to chemicals left on his truck, so he's bringing out more hives than I eventually want.

                                                  I don't mind that as, he's going to give me a great deal. I know I will need to feed them, but would like some advice on what flowers to put out that will help them. I have some fruit trees and roses, and plan on nasturiums. Wisteria will start now and there's clover. It's still cool here, so I'm putting more clover and vetch seed in the pasture. There's no other bees in the area, so they will have neighbors to forage on, too.

                                                  I have a large pond, so they have an adequate water source.

                                                  Thanks,
                                                  Ann

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