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Entrance Feeders - any good?

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  • bdloving
    I am looking to start 1-2 hives this year, and all the catalog beginner kits come with boardman entrance feeders. Yet the books I have read all seem negative
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 5, 2004
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      I am looking to start 1-2 hives this year, and all the catalog
      beginner kits come with boardman entrance feeders. Yet the books I
      have read all seem negative about these and recommend top Bottle
      feeding. any comments from the experienced would be welcome.
    • davidbrowder
      Might make a difference if your re in a very,very cold winter. Here in North Carolina for 25 years and I ve had no problems with entrance feeders.Keep Italians
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 5, 2004
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        Might make a difference if your're in a very,very cold winter. Here in North Carolina for 25 years and I've had no problems with entrance feeders.Keep Italians which are prone to rob each other, then one year the yellow jackets were pretty bad, had to close up the entrances a time or two. Had some mayonnaise jars freeze solid and bust one time though (Now that was cold!!), use mason jars.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: bdloving
        Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 11:59 AM
        Subject: [beekeeping] Entrance Feeders - any good?

        I am looking to start 1-2 hives this year, and all the catalog
        beginner kits come with boardman entrance feeders. Yet the books I
        have read all seem negative about these and recommend top Bottle
        feeding.  any comments from the experienced would be welcome.





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      • nayblaine@cs.com
        ... My experience is that the bees will often ignore the boardman feeder -- especially when its cold. Therefore, it won t help a weak/hungry hive through the
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 5, 2004
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          "bdloving" <bdloving@...> wrote:

          >...all the catalog beginner kits come with
          >boardman entrance feeders. Yet the books I
          >have read all seem negative about these and
          >recommend top Bottle feeding.

          My experience is that the bees will often ignore the boardman feeder -- especially when its cold. Therefore, it won't help a weak/hungry hive through the winter or if you're trying to get the queen to start laying early by making the hive think they've got a honey flow going on. In addition, the boardman feeder will freeze in cold weather, being outside. An internal feeded seems to never have these problems.

          However, here in the desert of Utah, I've found that a boardman feeder is useful as a summer water source for the bees.

          Blaine Nay
          www.nay.org/beekeep.htm
        • Eileen Barnes
          Blaine, Interesting about using the boardman feeder for water.  Could be useful here in hot FL summers.  Thanks. Eileen It s 2004 - time to gear up for
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 5, 2004
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            Blaine,

            Interesting about using the boardman feeder for water.  Could be
            useful here in hot FL summers.  Thanks.

            Eileen


            It's 2004 - time to gear up for November's Presidential election. Which candidate do you support? http://www.care2.com/go/z/election04
          • jfischer_supercollider
            Entrance feeders are included in kits for the same reason that they include the smallest and cheap smoker. They cost very little, yet are another thing to
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 6, 2004
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              Entrance feeders are included in kits for the
              same reason that they include the smallest and
              cheap smoker. They cost very little, yet are
              another "thing" to add perceived value to the
              "kit".

              I could rant for half an hour about "kits" in
              general. Most of them are are nearly basis for
              fraud convictions in my view.

              1) Use of an entrance feeder can encourage robbing.

              2) Even a new package can empty these feeders quickly.

              3) Glass has no business in a beeyard, as it a beeyard
              is a place where kneeling down to watch a hive
              entrance for a bit should be encouraged. Broken
              glass can ruin your whole afternoon.

              Their use as water sources cannot be faulted, but
              there are lots of ways to supply water to your bees
              that will not restrict the entrance. On a hot day,
              a glass jar in full sun can result in very hot water.
              Does not sound very refreshing, does it?

              I like plastic hive-top buckets, but I like wooden
              hive-top feeders more, and I really like the styrofoam
              hive-top feeders, except when I have to try to lift a
              full one (no handholds, hard to get a grip on it).
              My Dad likes the plastic buckets, but he has only 6
              colonies, so checking and refilling is not a problem
              for him. To each his own.
            • mnist@spamcop.net
              I agree! I started with Boardman feeders then found myself replenishing jars for my new hives sometimes twice and day and worrying about robbing. Sheesh. I got
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 7, 2004
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                I agree! I started with Boardman feeders then found myself replenishing jars for
                my new hives sometimes twice and day and worrying about robbing. Sheesh.

                I got a couple of those styrofoam top feeders and find them to be *excellent*
                Mine hold 3-5 gallons of syrup and I worry that my bees will starve if I can't
                get to them every day.

                I have a question about these top feeders though. Occasionally bees fall into
                the liquid and drown.

                Ok that's part of being a bee, but my question is what about all those little
                corpses in the syrup that I don't fish out on a daily basis? Do they taint the
                feed? make it taste bad/ unhealthy for the bees?

                Here in NJ our winter weather fluctuates wildly and I can't worry about opening
                the feeder section to clean it out every few days. What to do?

                Thanks in advance,
                --Madeleine in NJ

                Quoting jfischer_supercollider <jfischer@...>:

                > 3) Glass has no business in a beeyard, as it a beeyard
                > I like plastic hive-top buckets, but I like wooden
                > hive-top feeders more, and I really like the styrofoam
                > hive-top feeders, except when I have to try to lift a
                > full one (no handholds, hard to get a grip on it).
                > My Dad likes the plastic buckets, but he has only 6
                > colonies, so checking and refilling is not a problem
                > for him. To each his own.
                >
              • mnist@spamcop.net
                oops! that s supposed to say I DON T worry that my bees will starve --M
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 7, 2004
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                  oops! that's supposed to say "I DON'T worry that my bees will starve"

                  --M

                  Quoting mnist@...:


                  > I got a couple of those styrofoam top feeders and find them to be
                  > *excellent*
                  > Mine hold 3-5 gallons of syrup and I worry that my bees will starve
                  > if I can't
                  > get to them every day.
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