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Re: robbing honey

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  • Ken Adney
    First year, one hive in western WA state, started middle of April. Started with all foundation, no drawn comb. Pulled about 50 lbs, leaving well over 100 for
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 29, 1999
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      First year, one hive in western WA state, started middle of April. Started
      with all foundation, no drawn comb. Pulled about 50 lbs, leaving well over
      100 for the winter (I left a bit extra because we never know how long our
      winters are). For the supers, I used foundation held by pins in the side
      (not wired) & just cut the capped honey out out of the frames (so I'll lose
      a bit next year in the bees drawing out the comb), but I didn't have to put
      out the $ for an extractor this year. Made $54 last weekend at the local
      farmer's market, selling honey in the comb (and made some family members
      VERY happy).

      ken

      ----------
      > From: enna end <enna52@...>
      > spring. How are your bees doing?
      >
      > --- enna end <enna52@...> wrote:
      > > From: enna end <enna52@...>
      > >
      > > As the time goes by today while I am at work I can
      > > hardly wait for
      > > tomorrow to rob the honey. I plan to cut out the
      > > combs and break apart
      > > placing over a strainer and let gravity take its
      > > course. Am curious as
      > > to how much I will get. Will let you know. Thanks
      > > for the info.
      > >
      > > --- Farrington/Bequia Canvas <beqcan@...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > Hello everybody;
      > > > Enna wrote, "I am new to beekeeping...am about to
      > > > rob the honey"
      > > > Please let us know how it works.
      > > > Do you have an extractor?
      > > > How will you uncap the comb?
      > > > After extracting will you strain or filter?
      > > > How?
      > > > I too am new at this and am concentrating on
      > > trying
      > > > to build up my hives. I have one good strong hive
      > > > and one not so good.
      > > > I have not got so far as to enjoy the honey aspect
      > > > of this - I am content for now enjoying the bees.
      > > > While reading through various archives I came upon
      > > a
      > > > snippet pertaining to extraction. This fellow
      > > > suggests rather than straining right out of the
      > > > extractorr - 'cause there is so much "stuff" in
      > > the
      > > > honey it plugs the filter very quickly - that the
      > > > extracted honey be allowed to sit for a few days.
      > > > Apparently, the "stuff" rises to the top, can be
      > > > skimmed off and the honey remaining can be filterd
      > > > or used as is. The stuff can also be strained, of
      > > > course.
      > > > Let us know how you make out...
      > > > Bob in Bequia
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > > __________________________________________________
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      > > Bid and sell for free at http://auctions.yahoo.com
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      > >
      >
      >
    • grizzly bearnolds
      ... Don t be too disappointed. It will happen. This is our fourth or fifth year that we were unable to take any honey from them. Mostly due to the lousy year
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 13, 1999
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        At 99.09.29, you wrote:
        >From: enna end <enna52@...>
        >I was so disappointed to find I did not have enough
        >honey to rob. I guess I will have to wait until next
        >year.

        Don't be too disappointed. It will happen. This is our fourth or fifth year
        that we were unable to take any honey from them. Mostly due to the lousy
        year we have had again. Despite that, they managed to collect some of their
        winter stores, and we will have to feed them with as much syrup as they can
        take now.

        The problem is that they usually start out well in the Spring, and when I
        check sometime by early or late July, they seem to be well on their way of
        making nice stores. Then the rain comes, and it will rain all of August,
        all of September, all of 0ctober. No chance for them to get ahead. So we
        keep hoping for another year because after the second year of our
        beekeeping adventures, we got enough honey (filled 60 one-litre jars) that
        lasted two families for about two years.

        Next year will be better. That's our motto.

        Ma. / Nass Valley - British Columbia CANADA
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