Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Feeding Honeybees Honey May Increase Mortality

Expand Messages
  • Charles Walter
    After reviewing the details of the BIP survey results for two years where feeding honeybees carbohydrates is concerned, some very surprising suggestions come
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 9, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      After reviewing the details of the BIP survey results for two years where feeding honeybees carbohydrates is concerned, some very surprising suggestions come to light.

      More at: http://bit.ly/1pZvpSY

      Charles Walter

    • Gary Glaenzer
      it doesn’t matter what carbohydrates you choose to feed your honeybees, you are either not improving their chances of survival or you are damaging their
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 9, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        " it doesn’t matter what carbohydrates you choose to feed your honeybees,
        you are either not improving their chances of survival or you are damaging
        their chances of survival"


        yes, as opposed to NOT feeding them at all and letting them
        starve........which is not a 'chance' but a 'certainty'




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Charles Walter habutti@... [Beekeeping]
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2014 10:31 AM
        Subject: [Beekeeping] Feeding Honeybees Honey May Increase Mortality



        After reviewing the details of the BIP survey results for two years where
        feeding honeybees carbohydrates is concerned, some very surprising
        suggestions come to light.


        More at: http://bit.ly/1pZvpSY


        Charles Walter
      • mdudley
        If you feed some hives, and not others, then the ones you feed are those that are in trouble for some reason, and the others are healthy. The fact that you
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 9, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          If you feed some hives, and not others, then the ones you feed are those that are in trouble for some reason, and the others are healthy.  The fact that you are having to feed them is selecting a set of unhealthy hives, those you don't feed will be a set of healthy hives.  It is no surprise that the set of unhealthy hives have a higher mortality.

          Marshall
        • twelvevoltduckman@yahoo.com
          And those who feed all hives? AFA the study goes, the law of large numbers would negate your contention. Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 9, 2014
          • 0 Attachment

            And those who feed all hives?

            AFA the study goes, the law of large numbers would negate your contention.

            Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



            From: mdudley@... [Beekeeping] <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>;
            To: <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>;
            Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Feeding Honeybees Honey May Increase Mortality
            Sent: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 8:16:46 PM

             

            If you feed some hives, and not others, then the ones you feed are those that are in trouble for some reason, and the others are healthy.  The fact that you are having to feed them is selecting a set of unhealthy hives, those you don't feed will be a set of healthy hives.  It is no surprise that the set of unhealthy hives have a higher mortality.

            Marshall

          • Rich
            And don t forget that just the act of feeding can cause trouble for a hive. If the feeding is causing the fed hive to get robbed out, then the added stress of
            Message 5 of 14 , Jul 9, 2014
            • 0 Attachment
              And don't forget that just the act of feeding can cause trouble for a hive. If the feeding is causing the fed hive to get robbed out, then the added stress of defending the hive and loosing all their stores can cause the hive to be worse off than if never fed at all.

              Rich
              ---- "mdudley@... [Beekeeping]" <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
              > If you feed some hives, and not others, then the ones you feed are those that are in trouble for some reason, and the others are healthy. The fact that you are having to feed them is selecting a set of unhealthy hives, those you don't feed will be a set of healthy hives. It is no surprise that the set of unhealthy hives have a higher mortality.
              >
              > Marshall
            • anneinannandale
              For the last two years, varroa has been the significant culprit in my hive losses, and I don t think I m alone. Knowing that my hives were compromised, it made
              Message 6 of 14 , Jul 9, 2014
              • 0 Attachment
                For the last two years, varroa has been the significant culprit in my hive losses, and I don't think I'm alone. Knowing that my hives were compromised, it made sense to feed them in an effort to strengthen their fight against varroa.  Was there any correlation made in this study between varroa and feeding?  I am not scientifically adept,  but it seems like the two factors, whether taken together, or separately, could affect the results.  Thoughts?


                ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <habutti@...> wrote :

                After reviewing the details of the BIP survey results for two years where feeding honeybees carbohydrates is concerned, some very surprising suggestions come to light.

                More at: http://bit.ly/1pZvpSY

                Charles Walter

              • chris o
                No mention of parasites, weather or other factor. Again, the large sample included should negate other factors. There were links to the actual study for anyone
                Message 7 of 14 , Jul 9, 2014
                • 0 Attachment
                  No mention of parasites, weather or other factor. Again, the large sample included should negate other factors.
                  There were links to the actual study for anyone wanting more detail.


                  On Wednesday, July 9, 2014 8:02 PM, "anne.money@... [Beekeeping]" <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                   
                  For the last two years, varroa has been the significant culprit in my hive losses, and I don't think I'm alone. Knowing that my hives were compromised, it made sense to feed them in an effort to strengthen their fight against varroa.  Was there any correlation made in this study between varroa and feeding?  I am not scientifically adept,  but it seems like the two factors, whether taken together, or separately, could affect the results.  Thoughts?


                  ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <habutti@...> wrote :

                  After reviewing the details of the BIP survey results for two years where feeding honeybees carbohydrates is concerned, some very surprising suggestions come to light.

                  More at: http://bit.ly/1pZvpSY

                  Charles Walter



                • Rich
                  That s like asking a human: Will eating a healthy diet prevent head lice? Well, granted a well fed person is going to be more energetic and want to do
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jul 10, 2014
                  • 0 Attachment
                    That's like asking a human: "Will eating a healthy diet prevent head lice?" Well, granted a well fed person is going to be more energetic and want to do something about their lice, but there are much more important factors like the exposure to head lice in the first place and treating for the head lice that you already have.

                    Bottom line - Feeding your bees will not make the varroa go away!

                    Rich
                    ---- "anne.money@... [Beekeeping]" <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                    > For the last two years, varroa has been the significant culprit in my hive losses, and I don't think I'm alone. Knowing that my hives were compromised, it made sense to feed them in an effort to strengthen their fight against varroa. Was there any correlation made in this study between varroa and feeding? I am not scientifically adept, but it seems like the two factors, whether taken together, or separately, could affect the results. Thoughts?
                    >
                    > ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <habutti@...> wrote :
                    >
                    > After reviewing the details of the BIP survey results for two years where feeding honeybees carbohydrates is concerned, some very surprising suggestions come to light.
                    >
                    >
                    > More at: http://bit.ly/1pZvpSY http://bit.ly/1pZvpSY
                    >
                    >
                    > Charles Walter
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • karon
                    I feed back honey to y bees in a couple of ways, I rob in the summer and put it up in bottles. When I notice the bees need honey, I’ll feedback honey as well
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jul 10, 2014
                    • 0 Attachment

                      I feed back honey to y bees in a couple of ways, I rob in the summer and put it up in bottles. When I notice the bees need honey, I’ll feedback honey as well as feeding fortified sugar water. But seems to work well.

                       

                      Karon Adams

                      Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

                      You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

                      www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

                      www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

                       

                      From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com]
                      Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2014 7:40 PM
                      To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Feeding Honeybees Honey May Increase Mortality

                       

                       

                      And those who feed all hives?

                      AFA the study goes, the law of large numbers would negate your contention.

                      Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

                       


                      From: mdudley@... [Beekeeping] <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>;
                      To: <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>;
                      Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Feeding Honeybees Honey May Increase Mortality
                      Sent: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 8:16:46 PM

                       

                       

                      If you feed some hives, and not others, then the ones you feed are those that are in trouble for some reason, and the others are healthy.  The fact that you are having to feed them is selecting a set of unhealthy hives, those you don't feed will be a set of healthy hives.  It is no surprise that the set of unhealthy hives have a higher mortality.

                      Marshall

                    • Anne Money
                      Exactly, I couldn t agree more. I wouldn t expect feeding to make varroa go away. Treating and other management practices are necessary - which I now do. I was
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jul 10, 2014
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Exactly, I couldn't agree more. I wouldn't expect feeding to make varroa go away. Treating and other management practices are necessary - which I now do. I was taught my first year to manage with powdered sugar and quickly learned it wasn't enough. 

                        I was just saying there are so many factors involved that it seems it would be hard to identify feeding as a main common denominator given that varroa has gotten to be a significant killer. 

                        On Jul 10, 2014, at 6:24 PM, "Rich wd6esz@... [Beekeeping]" <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                         

                        That's like asking a human: "Will eating a healthy diet prevent head lice?" Well, granted a well fed person is going to be more energetic and want to do something about their lice, but there are much more important factors like the exposure to head lice in the first place and treating for the head lice that you already have.

                        Bottom line - Feeding your bees will not make the varroa go away!

                        Rich
                        ---- "anne.money@... [Beekeeping]" <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                        > For the last two years, varroa has been the significant culprit in my hive losses, and I don't think I'm alone. Knowing that my hives were compromised, it made sense to feed them in an effort to strengthen their fight against varroa. Was there any correlation made in this study between varroa and feeding? I am not scientifically adept, but it seems like the two factors, whether taken together, or separately, could affect the results. Thoughts?
                        >
                        > ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <habutti@...> wrote :
                        >
                        > After reviewing the details of the BIP survey results for two years where feeding honeybees carbohydrates is concerned, some very surprising suggestions come to light.
                        >
                        >
                        > More at: http://bit.ly/1pZvpSY http://bit.ly/1pZvpSY
                        >
                        >
                        > Charles Walter
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >

                      • mdudley
                        The law of large numbers does not negate it at all. For instance, similarly studies have shown that more people die in hospitals than anywhere else. The
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jul 11, 2014
                        • 0 Attachment
                          The law of large numbers does not negate it at all.  For instance, similarly studies have shown that more people die in hospitals than anywhere else.  The conclusion might be that going to a hospital increases your chance of dieing.  It doesn't matter if you do the math on one hospital, or all the hospitals in the world, the results are the same.

                          Marshall


                          ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <twelvevoltduckman@...> wrote :

                          And those who feed all hives?

                          AFA the study goes, the law of large numbers would negate your contention.

                          Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


                        • mdudley
                          That is especially true if you use an entrance feeder. Inside feeders are not so bad, but can still be a problem. Marshall
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jul 11, 2014
                          • 0 Attachment
                            That is especially true if you use an entrance feeder.  Inside feeders are not so bad, but can still be a problem.

                            Marshall
                          • mdudley
                            Again, increasing the size of the study does not shift the mean, it only decreases the deviation. For instance a study that has 100 entries in it, has a
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jul 11, 2014
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Again, increasing the size of the study does not shift the mean, it only decreases the deviation.  For instance a study that has 100 entries in it, has a standard deviation of +- 10% and one with 10,000 in it has a SD of +-1%.  But the mean will be the same, or only fluctuate within the level of the deviation.  One standard deviation gives about a 65% confidence level, 2 a 95% and 3 a 99.9%.

                              Marshall


                              ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <twelvevoltduckman@...> wrote :

                              No mention of parasites, weather or other factor. Again, the large sample included should negate other factors.
                              There were links to the actual study for anyone wanting more detail.


                              On Wednesday, July 9, 2014 8:02 PM, "anne.money@... [Beekeeping]" <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                               
                              For the last two years, varroa has been the significant culprit in my hive losses, and I don't think I'm alone. Knowing that my hives were compromised, it made sense to feed them in an effort to strengthen their fight against varroa.  Was there any correlation made in this study between varroa and feeding?  I am not scientifically adept,  but it seems like the two factors, whether taken together, or separately, could affect the results.  Thoughts?


                              ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <habutti@...> wrote :

                              After reviewing the details of the BIP survey results for two years where feeding honeybees carbohydrates is concerned, some very surprising suggestions come to light.

                              More at: http://bit.ly/1pZvpSY

                              Charles Walter



                            • mdudley
                              ... It depends. I and all the beekeepers in this area do not treat for varroa at all, and our losses are always under the national average. Fact is I have
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jul 11, 2014
                              • 0 Attachment
                                ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <anne.money@...> wrote :

                                >  Exactly, I couldn't agree more. I wouldn't expect feeding to make varroa go away. Treating and other management practices are necessary - which I now do. I was taught my first year to manage with powdered sugar and quickly learned it wasn't enough.

                                It depends.  I and all the beekeepers in this area do not treat for varroa at all, and our losses are always under the national average.  Fact is I have not even seen a varroa now in years and I don't know any beekeepers around here who have lost any hives to varroa in years.  All we do is use bees from feral swarms, and buy bees and queens from a local apiary that does not treat.  In addition some of us are using 4.9 mm comb.  Now hive beetles, that is another story.

                                > I was just saying there are so many factors involved that it seems it would be hard to identify feeding as a main common denominator given that varroa has gotten to be a significant killer.

                                I agree, but for us around here, pesticides are the main problem.

                                 If you look at the number of people who die who were taking antibiotics vs those who were not, the conclusion would be that giving antibiotics increases mortality as well.

                                Marshall

                                On Jul 10, 2014, at 6:24 PM, "Rich wd6esz@... [Beekeeping]" <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                 

                                That's like asking a human: "Will eating a healthy diet prevent head lice?" Well, granted a well fed person is going to be more energetic and want to do something about their lice, but there are much more important factors like the exposure to head lice in the first place and treating for the head lice that you already have.

                                Bottom line - Feeding your bees will not make the varroa go away!

                                Rich

                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.