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Something weird happened to one of my hives

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  • Michael Zaiontz
    Hello Everyone, I d like to get your opinion. Here s what happened: I was home the other day and I thought what I saw was a swarm. I m not too sure now. One of
    Message 1 of 3 , May 6, 2014
      
      Hello Everyone,
       
      I'd like to get your opinion. Here's what happened:
       
      I was home the other day and I thought what I saw was a swarm. I'm not too sure now. One of my hives (I have 8) was week but hanging on.  One day there were bees and the next they were gone. That swarm may have been them leaving.  Anyway, the hive consisted of 3 deep supers with the 3rd above an excluder screen.  The bottom 2 deeps were empty. There was drawn comb, nice pattern, with what looked like honey cells on the outside, brood cells on the inside.  There was virtually nothing, no brood, no honey, no queen cells, no sign of disease. Except for the top super that was full of capped honey!
       
      So I extracted the honey and put the frames out for the other bees to clean off.  For some reason only a few bees came to the frames. It's as if they did not want the honey. So to experiment, I put a small amount of honey on an inverted cup about 5 feet from the entrance to the hives. No takers. I would have thought they would have cleaned it up in seconds.
       
      Any ideas to this mystery?   Why would bees not want honey?  I'm going to try to get the honey tested to see if it contaminated.
       
      BTW - For reference my location is Louisiana
       
      Mike Z
    • Sherill Ryan
      If there was no brood, that hive has been queenless for some time. My guess is they have been dying out slowly. When was the last time you pulled the frames
      Message 2 of 3 , May 6, 2014
        If there was no brood, that hive has been queenless for some time. My guess is they have been dying out slowly. When was the last time you pulled the frames out prior to them leaving?

        You may not always see a queen cell after it is empty. A lot of times the bees will tear it apart one the queen emerges.

        Not sure why other bees wouldn't rob it. My guess is they will eventually. Maybe lots of bloom in your area and they are more interested in that. Could be pulling in lots of pollen to raise brood with.
        On Tuesday, May 6, 2014 3:49 PM, Michael Zaiontz <mzaiontz@...> wrote:
         
        
        Hello Everyone,
         
        I'd like to get your opinion. Here's what happened:
         
        I was home the other day and I thought what I saw was a swarm. I'm not too sure now. One of my hives (I have 8) was week but hanging on.  One day there were bees and the next they were gone. That swarm may have been them leaving.  Anyway, the hive consisted of 3 deep supers with the 3rd above an excluder screen.  The bottom 2 deeps were empty. There was drawn comb, nice pattern, with what looked like honey cells on the outside, brood cells on the inside.  There was virtually nothing, no brood, no honey, no queen cells, no sign of disease. Except for the top super that was full of capped honey!
         
        So I extracted the honey and put the frames out for the other bees to clean off.  For some reason only a few bees came to the frames. It's as if they did not want the honey. So to experiment, I put a small amount of honey on an inverted cup about 5 feet from the entrance to the hives. No takers. I would have thought they would have cleaned it up in seconds.
         
        Any ideas to this mystery?   Why would bees not want honey?  I'm going to try to get the honey tested to see if it contaminated.
         
        BTW - For reference my location is Louisiana
         
        Mike Z


      • Jorg Kewisch
        Are not disappearing bees and no robbing of the left-overs symptoms of colony collapse disorder? If it is, how confident are you that the swarm you saw came
        Message 3 of 3 , May 7, 2014
          Are not disappearing bees and no robbing of the left-overs symptoms of
          colony collapse disorder? If it is, how confident are you that the swarm
          you saw came from that hive?

          Jorg

          On 05/06/2014 04:47 PM, Michael Zaiontz wrote:
          > 
          >
          > Hello Everyone,
          > I'd like to get your opinion. Here's what happened:
          > I was home the other day and I thought what I saw was a swarm. I'm not
          > too sure now. One of my hives (I have 8) was week but hanging on. One
          > day there were bees and the next they were gone. That swarm may have
          > been them leaving. Anyway, the hive consisted of 3 deep supers with the
          > 3rd above an excluder screen. The bottom 2 deeps were empty. There was
          > drawn comb, nice pattern, with what looked like honey cells on the
          > outside, brood cells on the inside. There was virtually nothing, no
          > brood, no honey, no queen cells, no sign of disease. Except for the top
          > super that was full of capped honey!
          > So I extracted the honey and put the frames out for the other bees to
          > clean off. For some reason only a few bees came to the frames. It's as
          > if they did not want the honey. So to experiment, I put a small amount
          > of honey on an inverted cup about 5 feet from the entrance to the hives.
          > No takers. I would have thought they would have cleaned it up in seconds.
          > Any ideas to this mystery? Why would bees not want honey? I'm going
          > to try to get the honey tested to see if it contaminated.
          > BTW - For reference my location is Louisiana
          > Mike Z
          >
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