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Moths in Comb (BLECH!)

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  • billbird2111
    I had to rebuild my two colonies with nuc splits earlier this spring because I lost a colony that survived for the past two or three years. While I was
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 24 4:19 PM
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      I had to rebuild my two colonies with nuc splits earlier this spring because I lost a colony that survived for the past two or three years. While I was cleaning out both hive boxes -- I noticed that the colony I lost over the winter left quite a few frames packed with honey behind. So I moved them into the garage, waiting for the weather to warm up a bit before attempting to harvest.


      Well -- there must have been some sort of a moth problem in there because they're hatching out in incredible numbers. I guess it's the wax moth. Interestingly, I never saw them in the larval stage but they are all over those frames now.


      Is that honey a goner? What's your take?


      Bill

      Sacramento, CA


      I'm really glad I put the hive boxes through a full scraping and cleaning, plus put brand new frames in all of them, otherwise, this would still be a huge problem.

    • Gary Glaenzer
      freeze the frames, then give the frames to the colony ... From: billbird2111@yahoo.com To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2014 6:19 PM
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 24 4:40 PM
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        freeze the frames, then give the frames to the colony
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2014 6:19 PM
        Subject: [Beekeeping] Moths in Comb (BLECH!)

         

        I had to rebuild my two colonies with nuc splits earlier this spring because I lost a colony that survived for the past two or three years. While I was cleaning out both hive boxes -- I noticed that the colony I lost over the winter left quite a few frames packed with honey behind. So I moved them into the garage, waiting for the weather to warm up a bit before attempting to harvest.


        Well -- there must have been some sort of a moth problem in there because they're hatching out in incredible numbers. I guess it's the wax moth. Interestingly, I never saw them in the larval stage but they are all over those frames now.


        Is that honey a goner? What's your take?


        Bill

        Sacramento, CA


        I'm really glad I put the hive boxes through a full scraping and cleaning, plus put brand new frames in all of them, otherwise, this would still be a huge problem.

      • Crzy-Pony
        Been there but with out honey , should have put it in the freezer. Depending how bad they are you might still be able too On Thursday, April 24, 2014 7:40 PM,
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 24 5:40 PM
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          Been there but with out honey , should have put it in the freezer. Depending how bad they are you might still be able too
          On Thursday, April 24, 2014 7:40 PM, Gary Glaenzer <glaenzer@...> wrote:
          


          freeze the frames, then give the frames to the colony
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2014 6:19 PM
          Subject: [Beekeeping] Moths in Comb (BLECH!)

           
          I had to rebuild my two colonies with nuc splits earlier this spring because I lost a colony that survived for the past two or three years. While I was cleaning out both hive boxes -- I noticed that the colony I lost over the winter left quite a few frames packed with honey behind. So I moved them into the garage, waiting for the weather to warm up a bit before attempting to harvest.

          Well -- there must have been some sort of a moth problem in there because they're hatching out in incredible numbers. I guess it's the wax moth. Interestingly, I never saw them in the larval stage but they are all over those frames now.

          Is that honey a goner? What's your take?

          Bill
          Sacramento, CA

          I'm really glad I put the hive boxes through a full scraping and cleaning, plus put brand new frames in all of them, otherwise, this would still be a huge problem.




        • mdudley
          Wax moths, honey is not recoverable. I put frames with honey and or nectar in a zip lock or iron shut plastic bag to seal it up, and freeze for 48 hours. If
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 24 7:55 PM
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            Wax moths, honey is not recoverable.   I put frames with honey and or nectar in a zip lock or iron shut plastic bag to seal it up, and freeze for 48 hours.  If there is uncapped nectar, I toss in a silica dry pack as well to prevent mold.  When done this way it will keep for years.

            Marshall
          • Crzy-Pony
            Marshal You don t think that if the wax moth freeze the bees couldn t use the honey later??  thanks Marlene On Thursday, April 24, 2014 10:55 PM,
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 25 2:47 AM
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              Marshal
              You don't think that if the wax moth freeze the bees couldn't use the honey later?? 
              thanks
              Marlene
              On Thursday, April 24, 2014 10:55 PM, "mdudley@..." <mdudley@...> wrote:


              Wax moths, honey is not recoverable.   I put frames with honey and or nectar in a zip lock or iron shut plastic bag to seal it up, and freeze for 48 hours.  If there is uncapped nectar, I toss in a silica dry pack as well to prevent mold.  When done this way it will keep for years.

              Marshall




            • Gary Glaenzer
              I disagree Freeze it, kill the moths Then let the bees salvage it out of the frames The COMBS may not be recoverable but the honey certainly is ... From:
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 25 3:30 AM
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                I disagree
                 
                Freeze it, kill the moths
                 
                Then let the bees salvage it out of the frames
                 
                The COMBS may not be 'recoverable' but the honey certainly is
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2014 9:55 PM
                Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Moths in Comb (BLECH!)

                 

                Wax moths, honey is not recoverable.   I put frames with honey and or nectar in a zip lock or iron shut plastic bag to seal it up, and freeze for 48 hours.  If there is uncapped nectar, I toss in a silica dry pack as well to prevent mold.  When done this way it will keep for years.

                Marshall

              • crzybishma
                That was my thoughts exactly Sent from my iPhone ... That was my thoughts exactly Sent from my iPhone On Apr 25, 2014, at 6:30 AM, Gary Glaenzer
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 25 4:55 AM
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                  That was my thoughts exactly 

                  Sent from my iPhone

                  On Apr 25, 2014, at 6:30 AM, "Gary Glaenzer" <glaenzer@...> wrote:

                  
                   
                  I disagree
                   
                  Freeze it, kill the moths
                   
                  Then let the bees salvage it out of the frames
                   
                  The COMBS may not be 'recoverable' but the honey certainly is
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2014 9:55 PM
                  Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Moths in Comb (BLECH!)

                   

                  Wax moths, honey is not recoverable.   I put frames with honey and or nectar in a zip lock or iron shut plastic bag to seal it up, and freeze for 48 hours.  If there is uncapped nectar, I toss in a silica dry pack as well to prevent mold.  When done this way it will keep for years.

                  Marshall

                • mdudley
                  The problem is that the larvae leave their feces throughout the comb and honey. For the comb, the bees can clean it out, but I would not want to eat honey
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 25 8:14 AM
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                    The problem is that the larvae leave their feces throughout the comb and honey.  For the comb, the bees can clean it out, but I would not want to eat honey that had been full of wax moth feces.  It may be OK for the bees though, if not too far gone.

                    Marshall


                    ---In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, <crzybishma@...> wrote :

                    Marshal
                    You don't think that if the wax moth freeze the bees couldn't use the honey later?? 
                    thanks
                    Marlene
                    On Thursday, April 24, 2014 10:55 PM, "mdudley@..." <mdudley@...> wrote:


                    Wax moths, honey is not recoverable.   I put frames with honey and or nectar in a zip lock or iron shut plastic bag to seal it up, and freeze for 48 hours.  If there is uncapped nectar, I toss in a silica dry pack as well to prevent mold.  When done this way it will keep for years.

                    Marshall




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