Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

How do I find a wild hive..

Expand Messages
  • Wayne Chesley
    I started keeping bees this past spring. I have three hives of Italian bees. In the late summer, when I had left some brace comb scrapings near one hive for
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      I started keeping bees this past spring. I have three hives of
      Italian bees. In the late summer, when I had left some brace comb
      scrapings near one hive for the bees to clean up, I noticed a bee
      with different features among the clean up crew. Later under similar
      circumstances I saw another, and today when I put a jar of brace
      comb into a jar, not only did my bees get to work cleaning out the
      honey, but at least three of these foreigners were caught in the act.
      These bees are quite black in color, so much so that they are easy
      to spot. My first thoughe is that they are from a neighbor's hive,
      but to the best of my knowledge, there are no domestic hives within
      s mile or two of mine. I suspect a "wild" hive.

      In any case, I would love to devise a method of finding where these
      black bees come from. If they are "wild", they might be good stock,
      as they would be surviving without treatment for the varipus
      ailments and beasties threatening to (or alreading plaguing) my
      hives.

      So how can I discover the location of a hive or so of bees within a
      mile or so of my home. I'm patient, and this could be a good home
      school / 4-H / Boy Scout project for my son.

      Wayne in Maine
    • Mark Marinaccio
      Wayne: The dark black bees are probably a strain of midnight bees. They tend to be a very gentle bee when pure bread.... After a swarm or a queen
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 1, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Wayne:
         
        The dark black bees are probably a strain of "midnight" bees.   They tend to be a very gentle bee when pure bread....  After a swarm or a queen supersedure their attitude may change...
         
        In the old days there was a thing called a bee box...  It had openingings in it and a kind of maze inside...  some how oldtimers would use the thing to get the heading or "beeline" - Path of the bees in flight...  then would trek in the direction until they found the hive...  There was a good artical on them in one of the beeculture magazines a few years back.
         
        What are you going to do when you find them is another question though...  There are some good video tapes on how to hive bees found in a tree, or building...  You may want to watch one before trying....  It's alot of work....
         
        It is still easier to buy a queen, and split an existing hive in the spring !
         
         
        Sincerely
         
        Mark in Massachusetts
         


        Wayne Chesley <wantnotfarm@...> wrote:
        I started keeping bees this past spring. I have three hives of
        Italian bees. In the late summer, when I had left some brace comb
        scrapings near one hive for the bees to clean up, I noticed a bee
        with different features among the clean up crew. Later under similar
        circumstances I saw another, and today when I put a jar of brace
        comb into a jar, not only did my bees get to work cleaning out the
        honey, but at least three of these foreigners were caught in the act.
        These bees are quite black in color, so much so that they are easy
        to spot. My first thoughe is that they are from a neighbor's hive,
        but to the best of my knowledge, there are no domestic hives within
        s mile or two of mine. I suspect a "wild" hive.

        In any case, I would love to devise a method of finding where these
        black bees come from. If they are "wild", they might be good stock,
        as they would be surviving without treatment for the varipus
        ailments and beasties threatening to (or alreading plaguing) my
        hives.

        So how can I discover the location of a hive or so of bees within a
        mile or so of my home. I'm patient, and this could be a good home
        school / 4-H / Boy Scout project for my son.

        Wayne in Maine





        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        Do you Yahoo!?
        Exclusive Video Premiere - Britney Spears

      • jamesr1941@aol.com
        Wayne I had a neighbor would watch and see what direction they were going and he would sprinkle some flour on and then time how long it took her to return an
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 1, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Wayne I had a neighbor would watch and see what direction they were going and he would sprinkle some flour on and then time how long it took her to return an he could gage about how far the hive was and I have seen him walk right straight to it.
            When the bee returns to the hive she will go right straight to it.
            Jim
        • Leslie J. Huston
          I looked a bit and found this on bee boxes and bee hunting. http://www.samsgoodnews.com/tidbits.htm I ve never hunted wild bees myself, but I ve read about it
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 2, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            I looked a bit and found this on bee boxes and bee hunting.
            http://www.samsgoodnews.com/tidbits.htm

            I've never hunted wild bees myself, but I've read about it and talked
            about it with other beekeepers and the site above captures the main
            points on hunting bees.

            It would seem to me that if you captured a few of the 'target' bees in a
            jar, such as you described having done on some brace comb, you might not
            need a full-blown bee box - the bees in the jar would suffice. Fashion
            a jar lid that you can control to release one bee at a time and go for
            it. Bees forage 2-3 miles, and up to 5-6 in times of nectar scarcity,
            so be prepared to follow these bees to some other beekeeper's hive,
            after all your effort. Still, an interesting adventure almost whatever
            the outcome.

            Good luck, and I hope you let us know how it turns out!
            - Leslie


            Date: Sun, 02 Nov 2003 02:21:31 -0000
            From: "Wayne Chesley" <wantnotfarm@...>
            Subject: How do I find a wild hive..

            I started keeping bees this past spring. I have three hives of
            Italian bees. In the late summer, when I had left some brace comb
            scrapings near one hive for the bees to clean up, I noticed a bee
            with different features among the clean up crew. Later under similar
            circumstances I saw another, and today when I put a jar of brace
            comb into a jar, not only did my bees get to work cleaning out the
            honey, but at least three of these foreigners were caught in the act.
            These bees are quite black in color, so much so that they are easy
            to spot. My first thoughe is that they are from a neighbor's hive,
            but to the best of my knowledge, there are no domestic hives within
            s mile or two of mine. I suspect a "wild" hive.

            In any case, I would love to devise a method of finding where these
            black bees come from. If they are "wild", they might be good stock,
            as they would be surviving without treatment for the varipus
            ailments and beasties threatening to (or alreading plaguing) my
            hives.

            So how can I discover the location of a hive or so of bees within a
            mile or so of my home. I'm patient, and this could be a good home
            school / 4-H / Boy Scout project for my son.

            Wayne in Maine





            ________________________________________________________________________
            ________________________________________________________________________

            Message: 4
            Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2003 19:30:32 -0800 (PST)
            From: Mark Marinaccio <all99for1@...>
            Subject: Re: How do I find a wild hive..

            Wayne:

            The dark black bees are probably a strain of "midnight" bees. They
            tend to be a very gentle bee when pure bread.... After a swarm or a
            queen supersedure their attitude may change...

            In the old days there was a thing called a bee box... It had
            openingings in it and a kind of maze inside... some how oldtimers would
            use the thing to get the heading or "beeline" - Path of the bees in
            flight... then would trek in the direction until they found the hive...
            There was a good artical on them in one of the beeculture magazines a
            few years back.

            What are you going to do when you find them is another question
            though... There are some good video tapes on how to hive bees found in
            a tree, or building... You may want to watch one before trying....
            It's alot of work....

            It is still easier to buy a queen, and split an existing hive in the
            spring !


            Sincerely

            Mark in Massachusetts



            Wayne Chesley <wantnotfarm@...> wrote:
            I started keeping bees this past spring. I have three hives of
            Italian bees. In the late summer, when I had left some brace comb
            scrapings near one hive for the bees to clean up, I noticed a bee
            with different features among the clean up crew. Later under similar
            circumstances I saw another, and today when I put a jar of brace
            comb into a jar, not only did my bees get to work cleaning out the
            honey, but at least three of these foreigners were caught in the act.
            These bees are quite black in color, so much so that they are easy
            to spot. My first thoughe is that they are from a neighbor's hive,
            but to the best of my knowledge, there are no domestic hives within
            s mile or two of mine. I suspect a "wild" hive.

            In any case, I would love to devise a method of finding where these
            black bees come from. If they are "wild", they might be good stock,
            as they would be surviving without treatment for the varipus
            ailments and beasties threatening to (or alreading plaguing) my
            hives.

            So how can I discover the location of a hive or so of bees within a
            mile or so of my home. I'm patient, and this could be a good home
            school / 4-H / Boy Scout project for my son.

            Wayne in Maine




            Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


            ---------------------------------
            Do you Yahoo!?
            Exclusive Video Premiere - Britney Spears

            [This message contained attachments]



            ________________________________________________________________________
            ________________________________________________________________________

            Message: 5
            Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2003 23:32:06 EST
            From: jamesr1941@...
            Subject: Re: How do I find a wild hive..

            Wayne I had a neighbor would watch and see what direction they were
            going and
            he would sprinkle some flour on and then time how long it took her to
            return
            an he could gage about how far the hive was and I have seen him walk
            right
            straight to it.
            When the bee returns to the hive she will go right straight to it.
            Jim
          • Wayne Chesley
            Oh, I v figured that these strangers have maybe wandered from another bee keeper s yard. But certainly the hunt would be an interesting activity. I ll give
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 3, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              Oh, I'v figured that these strangers have maybe wandered from
              another bee keeper's yard. But certainly the "hunt" would be an
              interesting activity. I'll give my son the information and it will
              make a good homeschool / Boyscout project. I can even think of a few
              ways to modify the project by attracting bees to feeding stations
              some distance apart, and "triangulating" on their return
              destination. Thanks all.

              Wayne (and Stevie)


              --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Leslie J. Huston"
              <ljhuston3@c...> wrote:
              > I looked a bit and found this on bee boxes and bee hunting.
              > http://www.samsgoodnews.com/tidbits.htm
            • bdloving
              Here is a good article to start with: http://www.beesource.com/pov/wenner/bsjun1992.htm ... similar ... act.
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 3, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                Here is a good article to start with:
                http://www.beesource.com/pov/wenner/bsjun1992.htm

                --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Wayne Chesley" <wantnotfarm@h...>
                wrote:
                > I started keeping bees this past spring. I have three hives of
                > Italian bees. In the late summer, when I had left some brace comb
                > scrapings near one hive for the bees to clean up, I noticed a bee
                > with different features among the clean up crew. Later under
                similar
                > circumstances I saw another, and today when I put a jar of brace
                > comb into a jar, not only did my bees get to work cleaning out the
                > honey, but at least three of these foreigners were caught in the
                act.
                > These bees are quite black in color, so much so that they are easy
                > to spot. My first thoughe is that they are from a neighbor's hive,
                > but to the best of my knowledge, there are no domestic hives within
                > s mile or two of mine. I suspect a "wild" hive.
                >
                > In any case, I would love to devise a method of finding where these
                > black bees come from. If they are "wild", they might be good stock,
                > as they would be surviving without treatment for the varipus
                > ailments and beasties threatening to (or alreading plaguing) my
                > hives.
                >
                > So how can I discover the location of a hive or so of bees within a
                > mile or so of my home. I'm patient, and this could be a good home
                > school / 4-H / Boy Scout project for my son.
                >
                > Wayne in Maine
              • Idris M.B.Zaria
                Leslie J. Huston Down here in Nigeria we do not have package bees.All our colonies are captured or they just come on their own during swarming seasons. check
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 3, 2003
                • 0 Attachment


                  "Leslie J. Huston"
                   
                   
                  Down here in Nigeria we do not have package bees.All our colonies are captured or they just come on their own during swarming seasons.
                  check me at www. biye.beekeepers.8m.net.
                   
                   
                  Idrisbee


                  Do you Yahoo!?
                  Exclusive Video Premiere - Britney Spears
                • zoodood71
                  I was given a puppy for Christmas had have started training it. This weekend, I got the idea to train it to search for feral bees. But before I started, I
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 15, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I was given a puppy for Christmas had have started training it. This
                    weekend, I got the idea to train it to search for feral bees. But
                    before I started, I imagined him pawing on my hives anytime I left
                    him in the yard. I decided that it wouldn't be a good idea after
                    all.
                    Coyote
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.