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Re: [Beekeeping] Definition of raw honey

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  • LINDA PICAZO
    I THINK RAW MEANS NOT HEATED AND PROCESSED LIKE IT IS IN STORES   Linda Picazo linda_diana1@yahoo.com   ________________________________ From: pj121201
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 22, 2013
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      I THINK RAW MEANS NOT HEATED AND PROCESSED LIKE IT IS IN STORES
       
       
      Linda Picazo
      linda_diana1@...
       

      From: pj121201 <pakjohnson@...>
      To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, July 22, 2013 11:31 AM
      Subject: [Beekeeping] Definition of raw honey
       
      I'm wondering what other beekeepers consider "raw" honey.

      My definition is that there's nothing extra added to the honey and that it's not been heated. I do harvest my honey using a cappings scratcher and a manual 3-frame extractor, then allowing it to run through a double sieve to catch excess wax.

      For "raw" honey, do you let it run through a sieve or just bottle it straight from the extractor? I've bottled it direct from the extractor and found that my "raw" honey customers (or those who said they wanted raw honey) were a bit taken aback at the layer of wax on top of the honey.

      There seems to be some variable around the definition, so - how do YOU process your "raw" honey?

      Pamela in Wisconsin

    • Mike S
      ... My recommendation would be to let the honey settle for at least 24 hours to let the debris float to the top and to skim that off so it s not a part of the
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 22, 2013
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        >>>   ... what other beekeepers consider "raw" honey.
        >>>   I've bottled it direct from the extractor....

        My recommendation would be to let the honey settle for at least 24 hours to let the debris float to the top and to skim that off so it's not a part of the bottled honey.  Having this in your honey is a sales killer and can be avoided by the bottler.

        I strain and let set for several days and then skim the top.  You want to present an attractive product to your customers.  They don't want to look at nor have to skim the debris from the top of their honey.  I do not heat my honey except when it has crystallized on it's own.  I do use the Dyce Process to make creamed honey.  http://www.masterbeekeeper.org/dyce/creamhoney.htm 
         
        Mike in LA
      • pj121201
        I do all of the things talked about here: - strain it - let it sit for at least 24 hrs before bottling - heat-free, let it crystallize as it will My honey is a
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 23, 2013
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          I do all of the things talked about here:

          - strain it
          - let it sit for at least 24 hrs before bottling
          - heat-free, let it crystallize as it will

          My honey is a beautiful, pale yellow color with nothing weird floating in it. I've never had any issues with selling it. I only had one person that asked for it directly out of the hive, no straining. I cautioned her that it would have wax floating on the top. But she wanted it anyway. She's a real earth-mother type of person, but even she was ready for the strained honey the next year! A few years ago I got her started with her own hives and now she has her own honey. :)

          I was more curious about how people defined "Raw" honey. My definition is strained and not heated.

          PJ
        • pj121201
          Thanks everyone! Always interesting to hear about what others are doing and their definitions of what seem to be common beekeeping terms. PJ
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 23, 2013
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            Thanks everyone! Always interesting to hear about what others are doing and their definitions of what seem to be common beekeeping terms.

            PJ
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