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RE: [Beekeeping] Re: My right thumb

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  • karon
    I have to use gloves. I am a little sensitive to the stings so I do wear them. I have adrenal issues which make the nerve endings FAR more sensitive than
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 17, 2013

      I have to use gloves. I am a little sensitive to the stings so I do wear them. I have adrenal issues which make the nerve endings FAR more sensitive than normal people’s skin. So I wear gear. With the problems I face, each day, I have come to the conclusion that there is no nobility in pain. If I can do a job with protection and avoid any intentional pain, then I do so.

       

      As for working while wearing gloves, I am used to them. a well fitting pair of gloves, in any context, can be just as dexterous as bare hands. I don’t think the gloves prevent me from doing anything and I haven’t noticed being much more clumsy with gloves than I would be without. Without, my fingers are, of course, smaller, but, the knowledge that the sting may come, and knowing it will hurt me more than most, makes me more nervous which, in turn, could cause more problems than the gloves.

       

      Karon Adams

      Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

      You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

      www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

      www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

       

      From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mdudley@...
      Sent: Sunday, June 16, 2013 10:42 PM
      To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: My right thumb

       

       

      What I find remarkable is that people can work hives with gloves. I gave up on using gloves in the early 60's, and have worked my bees with bare hands ever since. I found that the clumsiness, and smashed bees from using gloves actually caused me to get more stings, not less.

      Marshall

      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "karon" <karon@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'll try that. and, yes, it seems to be the combination of the thumb on that
      > glove and that one end of that one frame. Anywhere else and they seem to
      > ignore me. This was the hive that fought so hard over their queen. I call
      > this one Elsinore (I know, naming hives is silly, but it makes it easier to
      > keep up with which hive is which. Easier than keeping numbers straight) So,
      > Elsinore has tried to supercede their original queen, not accepted either
      > one they raised but finally accepted one I bought. Now that they are
      > queenright, they are very calm. Right up until I make it to this one frame.
      > Then, suddenly, they go after the thumb. While the bees at the other end of
      > the frame are perfectly content as are the ones on the adjoining frames.
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks for the idea. I'll hit it with the oxiclean and see if that works.
      >
      >
      >
      > Karon Adams
      >
      > Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)
      >
      > You can send a Rosary to a soldier!
      >
      > www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary
      >
      > www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com
      >
      >
      >
      > From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of Thomas Janstrom
      > Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2013 6:46 PM
      > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] My right thumb
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Maybe you have that fingertip so impregnated with pheromone now that they
      > can't ignore it? Or its the frame and the glove that have too much "squished
      > bee" aroma?
      > Try giving the gloves a cold hand wash with some oxy-stain remover stuff?
      >
      > Thomas.
      > Precision faceter.
      >
      > On 15/06/2013 1:03 AM, karon wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Well, here's a fun one. For some reason, and I cannot imagine what, I have,
      > in one hive, one side of one frame that seems to have a significant problem
      > with my right thumb! I know when a bee stings, they leave the 'sting here,
      > enemy' pheromone behind. But, for some reason, this one spot on this one
      > frame always seems to trigger an attack. But only on the tip of that one
      > digit on my glove.
      >
      >
      >
      > So, I'm wondering, is there, perhaps a pheromone on the frame, or a
      > lingering one on that part of the glove? And, what would be the best way to
      > remove it? Leave them in the sunlight, use some soap and water? I mean, they
      > are leather gloves so it isn't like I am being injured. I just hate seeing 6
      > or 8 bees lose their lives attacking that spot. It seems to happen every
      > time. And just that part of the glove and only when I am at that point in
      > the inspection. The other hive doesn't have a problem with the gloves. And,
      > even this hive has no problem until I reach that, one frame.
      >
      >
      >
      > Kind of strange. Oh, and the queen was nowhere near that part of the hive. I
      > thought, at first, perhaps she was on that frame and that was why they were
      > unhappy when that frame was pulled.
      >
      >
      >
      > Karon Adams
      >
      > Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)
      >
      > You can send a Rosary to a soldier!
      >
      > www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary
      >
      > www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com
      >

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