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strengthening a hive

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  • S
    Anyone had any luck in taking capped brood from a good performing hive and placing it in a slow hive, to build up the numbers? I didnt know if the new
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 13 5:36 AM
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      Anyone had any luck in taking capped brood from a good performing hive and placing it in a slow hive, to build up the numbers? I didnt know if the new emerging bees would be accepted or rejected.

      Honey flow has been great this spring, here....
      location: Fort Worth, Texas

      By the way, I think it would be beneficial for everyone posting on here to give their general geographic locations as a point of reference of the discussion. 90 % of the responses seem to be "Where are you located."

      Thanks

      Steve
    • mdudley
      Emerging bees should always be accepted. I have not done it, but have never heard of it being a problem. Many beekeepers will requeen with a queen cell near
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 13 10:12 AM
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        Emerging bees should always be accepted. I have not done it, but have never heard of it being a problem.

        Many beekeepers will requeen with a queen cell near emergence, instead of introducing a virgin or mated queen because of the high level of acceptance with no "getting to know her" period required.

        Marshall
        Knoxville, TN

        --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "S" <sfg0101010@...> wrote:
        >
        > Anyone had any luck in taking capped brood from a good performing hive and placing it in a slow hive, to build up the numbers? I didnt know if the new emerging bees would be accepted or rejected.
        >
        > Honey flow has been great this spring, here....
        > location: Fort Worth, Texas
        >
        > By the way, I think it would be beneficial for everyone posting on here to give their general geographic locations as a point of reference of the discussion. 90 % of the responses seem to be "Where are you located."
        >
        > Thanks
        >
        > Steve
        >
      • Rich
        Hi Steve, That is a great technique to build a strong colony by adding resources. Much more effective to accept incoming brood as opposed to trying to
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 13 10:14 AM
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          Hi Steve,

          That is a great technique to build a strong colony by adding resources. Much more effective to accept incoming brood as opposed to trying to introduce a queen into an African hive.

          Rich in So Cal
          ---- S <sfg0101010@...> wrote:
          > Anyone had any luck in taking capped brood from a good performing hive and placing it in a slow hive, to build up the numbers? I didnt know if the new emerging bees would be accepted or rejected.
          >
          > Honey flow has been great this spring, here....
          > location: Fort Worth, Texas
          >
          > By the way, I think it would be beneficial for everyone posting on here to give their general geographic locations as a point of reference of the discussion. 90 % of the responses seem to be "Where are you located."
          >
          > Thanks
          >
          > Steve
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Jorg Kewisch
          You can also swap the location of a weak hive with a strong hive. Foragers which come to a hive loaded with nectar or pollen are usually accepted, robbers
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 13 10:41 AM
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            You can also swap the location of a weak hive with a strong hive.
            Foragers which come to a hive loaded with nectar or pollen are usually
            accepted, robbers don't bring anything. So the foragers of the strong
            hive end up in the weak hive and give it a boost.
            It is less work than opening both hives and getting all bees of the
            frames you swap.

            On 06/13/2013 08:36 AM, S wrote:
            > Anyone had any luck in taking capped brood from a good performing hive
            > and placing it in a slow hive, to build up the numbers? I didnt know if
            > the new emerging bees would be accepted or rejected.
            >
          • Crzy-Pony
            I have heard this will work as long as you brush the bees off before trying to place in a strange hive Marlene NH ... From: S Subject:
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 13 1:53 PM
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              I have heard this will work as long as you brush the bees off before trying to place in a strange hive
              Marlene
              NH

              --- On Thu, 6/13/13, S <sfg0101010@...> wrote:

              From: S <sfg0101010@...>
              Subject: [Beekeeping] strengthening a hive
              To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Thursday, June 13, 2013, 8:36 AM

              Anyone had any luck in taking capped brood from a good performing hive and placing it in a slow hive, to build up the numbers?  I didnt know if the new emerging bees would be accepted or rejected.

              Honey flow has been great this spring, here....
              location: Fort Worth, Texas

              By the way, I think it would be beneficial for everyone posting on here to give their general geographic locations as a point of reference of the discussion.  90 % of the responses seem to be "Where are you located."

              Thanks

              Steve



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            • karon
              I have done that, from time to time. It is also helpful if you need some young brood to be able to trade over younger brood or eggs. This is one of the main
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 14 5:34 AM
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                I have done that, from time to time. It is also helpful if you need some young brood to be able to trade over younger brood or eggs. This is one of the main reasons to never only have one, single hive. I always like to have, at least two in case, for any reason, you need to swap between them.

                 

                Karon Adams

                Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

                You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

                www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

                www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

                 

                From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of S
                Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 8:36 AM
                To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Beekeeping] strengthening a hive

                 

                 

                Anyone had any luck in taking capped brood from a good performing hive and placing it in a slow hive, to build up the numbers? I didnt know if the new emerging bees would be accepted or rejected.

                Honey flow has been great this spring, here....
                location: Fort Worth, Texas

                By the way, I think it would be beneficial for everyone posting on here to give their general geographic locations as a point of reference of the discussion. 90 % of the responses seem to be "Where are you located."

                Thanks

                Steve

              • roger g
                I ve done it a couple times early in yr to help a hive that came thru winter weak and need a boost. I take nurse bees and all and put them in with no problem.
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 14 3:38 PM
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                  I've done it a couple times early in yr to help a hive that came thru winter weak and need a boost. I take nurse bees and all and put them in with no problem.
                  If i have a quennless hive i take a frame of eggs and put in let them raise their own Queen. good luck . roger NJ

                  --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "S" <sfg0101010@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Anyone had any luck in taking capped brood from a good performing hive and placing it in a slow hive, to build up the numbers? I didnt know if the new emerging bees would be accepted or rejected.
                  >
                  > Honey flow has been great this spring, here....
                  > location: Fort Worth, Texas
                  >
                  > By the way, I think it would be beneficial for everyone posting on here to give their general geographic locations as a point of reference of the discussion. 90 % of the responses seem to be "Where are you located."
                  >
                  > Thanks
                  >
                  > Steve
                  >
                • karon
                  That is also a good way to hold a hive while a new queen in en route. When you realize you are without a queen, grab a frame with eggs in it and they ll, at
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 14 4:39 PM
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                    That is also a good way to hold a hive while a new queen in en route. When you realize you are without a queen, grab a frame with eggs in it and they’ll, at least, be able to start a new queen. Even if you don’t want to keep the home raised queen it will keep them happy and focused until a known queen can arrive.

                     

                    The hive I installed earlier in the season tried to supersede as soon as I installed them. there are still some capped cells that look like they were drones. The package had a LOT of drones in it, then the queen was laying drones. I have since talked to some other folks who had the same problem from the same apiary. I don’t know what caused it. but, when I realized what was happening, I made certain to install known queens. I am assuming that the original queens weren’t well mated.

                     

                    The one I installed is finally up and running. Meanwhile, the hive next to it is very full. They’ll have their first super this weekend.  I am pretty pleased with the buildup since it has only been about 6-7 weeks.

                     

                    I don’t know if any of you have tried top bar hives but I’m planning to put a couple in, in the next few weeks to see how they do.

                     

                    Karon Adams

                    Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

                    You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

                    www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

                    www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

                     

                    From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of roger g
                    Sent: Friday, June 14, 2013 6:39 PM
                    To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: strengthening a hive

                     

                     

                    I've done it a couple times early in yr to help a hive that came thru winter weak and need a boost. I take nurse bees and all and put them in with no problem.
                    If i have a quennless hive i take a frame of eggs and put in let them raise their own Queen. good luck . roger NJ

                    --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "S" <sfg0101010@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Anyone had any luck in taking capped brood from a good performing hive and placing it in a slow hive, to build up the numbers? I didnt know if the new emerging bees would be accepted or rejected.
                    >
                    > Honey flow has been great this spring, here....
                    > location: Fort Worth, Texas
                    >
                    > By the way, I think it would be beneficial for everyone posting on here to give their general geographic locations as a point of reference of the discussion. 90 % of the responses seem to be "Where are you located."
                    >
                    > Thanks
                    >
                    > Steve
                    >

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