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caught a swarm today Now what.

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  • R. Blair
    while working on a brush pile today I noticed a swarm of bees on a branch. I was able to scoop the bulk of the swarm into a hive body with several frames. I
    Message 1 of 3 , May 5, 2013
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      while working on a brush pile today I noticed a swarm of bees on a branch. I was able to scoop the bulk of the swarm into a hive body with several frames. I have the entrance blocked. How do I keep the bees from fleeing the hive body when I open the entrance. I have two feeders of sugar water ready but I am not sure whether to leave the trapped over night or to go ahead and open the entrance

      Van Blair
    • Thomas Janstrom
      I d leave them trapped over night so you can move them to a different location and they can start to get settled in their new home. If you can sneak the feeder
      Message 2 of 3 , May 5, 2013
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        I'd leave them trapped over night so you can move them to a different location and they can start to get settled in their new home. If you can sneak the feeder in over night that might help too.

        Just some thoughts from a beek who's never caught a swarm, but done lots of walk away splits (which is pretty much what a swarm is anyway).....

        Cheers, Thomas.

        On 6/05/2013 9:21 AM, R. Blair wrote:
         

        while working on a brush pile today I noticed a swarm of bees on a branch. I was able to scoop the bulk of the swarm into a hive body with several frames. I have the entrance blocked. How do I keep the bees from fleeing the hive body when I open the entrance. I have two feeders of sugar water ready but I am not sure whether to leave the trapped over night or to go ahead and open the entrance

        Van Blair


      • husztek
        Move them into a hive box with frames of drawn comb, some of it capped honey if you have it. A couple of drops of lemon grass oil help. Move them to another
        Message 3 of 3 , May 5, 2013
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          Move them into a hive box with frames of drawn comb, some of it capped honey if you have it.
          A couple of drops of lemon grass oil help.

          Move them to another location in the yard where they can settle in.

          If you have gotten their queen, check them in a week and you will see eggs.
          If not when you check you may find just lethagic or alternatively angry bees.
          Meanwhile, line up another queen to put in if you are queenless.

          Thanks,

          Bill

          ---- On Sun, 05 May 2013 17:27:54 -0700 Thomas Janstrom<t_janstrom@...> wrote ----

           

          I'd leave them trapped over night so you can move them to a different location and they can start to get settled in their new home. If you can sneak the feeder in over night that might help too.

          Just some thoughts from a beek who's never caught a swarm, but done lots of walk away splits (which is pretty much what a swarm is anyway).....

          Cheers, Thomas.

          On 6/05/2013 9:21 AM, R. Blair wrote:
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          while working on a brush pile today I noticed a swarm of bees on a branch. I was able to scoop the bulk of the swarm into a hive body with several frames. I have the entrance blocked. How do I keep the bees from fleeing the hive body when I open the entrance. I have two feeders of sugar water ready but I am not sure whether to leave the trapped over night or to go ahead and open the entrance

          Van Blair





          Bill Husztek
          Black Squirrel Cottage Enterprises
          7558 Marshall Drive
          Annandale, VA 22003
          703-573-8842
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