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Bee removal from house

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  • bslack007
    I ve been doing bee s a couple of years. I ve got a stray colony of bee s in the wall of my house. While this doesn t bother me personally I m about to sell
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 29 3:15 PM
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      I've been doing bee's a couple of years. I've got a stray colony of bee's in the wall of my house. While this doesn't bother me personally I'm about to sell it and will need them gone.

      If I'm going to remove them, I'd like to keep them, another hive would be welcome.

      Not sure where to start, how to make sure I catch the queen, any advice would be welcome!

      Brian
    • karon
      They need to come out whether you are selling the house, or not. If they are left there, over time, the honey and wax can damage the house. That said, removing
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 29 3:57 PM
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        They need to come out whether you are selling the house, or not. If they are left there, over time, the honey and wax can damage the house.

         

        That said, removing them will be as easy or as hard as its location. If they are located close to a window or door, that makes it easier. If nowhere near such things, that makes it harder. You are probably going to have to remove significant segments of the structure of the wall. Carefully, of course.

         

        You may not find the queen, at all. When my father and I used to do this, we gathered as many of the bees as we could but, you probably won’t find the queen. Or, she may be lost in the deconstruction process.

         

        Whatever you do, you’ll have to repair the wall and find their doorway to make sure it is closed to future swarms. Once that scent is in the space, future swarms will hone in on it. The most important thing is to clean it ALL out.

         

        You might want to have a hive body with plenty of frames ready when you open the wall. I have also had good luck when clearing a building by maki9ng sure I had some brood waiting in the hive box. Remember, the wax and brood in the walls will likely not be salvageable. So, having brood waiting for them makes it more likely that the will stay in their new hive rather than absconding.

         

        Karon Adams

        Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

        You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

        www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

        www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

         

        From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of bslack007
        Sent: Monday, April 29, 2013 6:16 PM
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Beekeeping] Bee removal from house

         

         

        I've been doing bee's a couple of years. I've got a stray colony of bee's in the wall of my house. While this doesn't bother me personally I'm about to sell it and will need them gone.

        If I'm going to remove them, I'd like to keep them, another hive would be welcome.

        Not sure where to start, how to make sure I catch the queen, any advice would be welcome!

        Brian

      • bslack007
        I ve seen them in the same spot before. In years past they ve vanished within a few weeks, but not this time. Is there a preferred method? Just open it up and
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 29 6:28 PM
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          I've seen them in the same spot before. In years past they've vanished within a few weeks, but not this time.

          Is there a preferred method? Just open it up and start cutting? I've considered using a shop vac, but it seems like it would injure them.



          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "karon" <karon@...> wrote:
          >
          > They need to come out whether you are selling the house, or not. If they are
          > left there, over time, the honey and wax can damage the house.
          >
          >
          >
          > That said, removing them will be as easy or as hard as its location. If they
          > are located close to a window or door, that makes it easier. If nowhere near
          > such things, that makes it harder. You are probably going to have to remove
          > significant segments of the structure of the wall. Carefully, of course.
          >
          >
          >
          > You may not find the queen, at all. When my father and I used to do this, we
          > gathered as many of the bees as we could but, you probably won't find the
          > queen. Or, she may be lost in the deconstruction process.
          >
          >
          >
          > Whatever you do, you'll have to repair the wall and find their doorway to
          > make sure it is closed to future swarms. Once that scent is in the space,
          > future swarms will hone in on it. The most important thing is to clean it
          > ALL out.
          >
          >
          >
          > You might want to have a hive body with plenty of frames ready when you open
          > the wall. I have also had good luck when clearing a building by maki9ng sure
          > I had some brood waiting in the hive box. Remember, the wax and brood in the
          > walls will likely not be salvageable. So, having brood waiting for them
          > makes it more likely that the will stay in their new hive rather than
          > absconding.
          >
          >
          >
          > Karon Adams
          >
          > Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)
          >
          > You can send a Rosary to a soldier!
          >
          > www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary
          >
          > www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com
          >
          >
          >
          > From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On
          > Behalf Of bslack007
          > Sent: Monday, April 29, 2013 6:16 PM
          > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Beekeeping] Bee removal from house
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > I've been doing bee's a couple of years. I've got a stray colony of bee's in
          > the wall of my house. While this doesn't bother me personally I'm about to
          > sell it and will need them gone.
          >
          > If I'm going to remove them, I'd like to keep them, another hive would be
          > welcome.
          >
          > Not sure where to start, how to make sure I catch the queen, any advice
          > would be welcome!
          >
          > Brian
          >
        • Kewisch, Jorg
          first a disclaimer: I have NOT done this myself, this is what other beekeepers told me! There are 2 ways: One is open the wall from the inside. Sheet rock is
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 29 6:40 PM
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            first a disclaimer: I have NOT done this myself, this is what other beekeepers told me!

            There are 2 ways: One is open the wall from the inside. Sheet rock is easier to fix than the outside. The problem is to find the bees, the nest may not be where the entrance is. You can try to salvage the honey combs by attaching them to empty frames (without foundation) with rubber bands. professionals have a special bee vacuum, and they can vacuum the bees into a big box without hurting them (the inside of the hose is totally smooth).
            The other way is to close all but one entrance and attach a wire mesh cone to the entrance. The tip of the cone (pointing outwards) has a tiny hole big enough for the bees to exit, but they don't find their way back in. You place a queen-right hive next to it. The returning bees will end up in the outside hive. The colony on the inside does not get any supplies, the queen will stop laying and the colony dies after the last eggs have turned into foragers. You keep this up though the swarming season. When the summer dearth sets in you remove the cone and the outside bees will rob the the inside nest and remove all honey. As Karon said: you must get the honey out or it will rot and cause damage.

            Good luck!
            ________________________________________
            From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of bslack007 [bslack007@...]
            Sent: Monday, April 29, 2013 6:15 PM
            To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Beekeeping] Bee removal from house

            I've been doing bee's a couple of years. I've got a stray colony of bee's in the wall of my house. While this doesn't bother me personally I'm about to sell it and will need them gone.

            If I'm going to remove them, I'd like to keep them, another hive would be welcome.

            Not sure where to start, how to make sure I catch the queen, any advice would be welcome!

            Brian
          • Crzy-Pony
            The shop vac by itself is to harsh and will kill them, on line you will find directions for a Bee vac,its worth building.To help locate them you might use a
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 30 4:15 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              The shop vac by itself is to harsh and will kill them, on line you will find directions for a Bee vac,its worth building.To help locate them you might use a glass pressed to the wall or a stethoscope. listen for the heaviest/loudest sound when you tap on the wall. Once you figure out where they are congregated go to work in your bee suit, and hopefully in a closed room.
              good luck let us know how you make out.
              Marlene   

              --- On Mon, 4/29/13, bslack007 <bslack007@...> wrote:

              From: bslack007 <bslack007@...>
              Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Bee removal from house
              To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, April 29, 2013, 9:28 PM

              I've seen them in the same spot before.  In years past they've vanished within a few weeks, but not this time.

              Is there a preferred method? Just open it up and start cutting? I've considered using a shop vac, but it seems like it would injure them.



              --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "karon" <karon@...> wrote:
              >
              > They need to come out whether you are selling the house, or not. If they are
              > left there, over time, the honey and wax can damage the house.
              >

              >
              > That said, removing them will be as easy or as hard as its location. If they
              > are located close to a window or door, that makes it easier. If nowhere near
              > such things, that makes it harder. You are probably going to have to remove
              > significant segments of the structure of the wall. Carefully, of course.
              >

              >
              > You may not find the queen, at all. When my father and I used to do this, we
              > gathered as many of the bees as we could but, you probably won't find the
              > queen. Or, she may be lost in the deconstruction process.
              >

              >
              > Whatever you do, you'll have to repair the wall and find their doorway to
              > make sure it is closed to future swarms. Once that scent is in the space,
              > future swarms will hone in on it. The most important thing is to clean it
              > ALL out.
              >

              >
              > You might want to have a hive body with plenty of frames ready when you open
              > the wall. I have also had good luck when clearing a building by maki9ng sure
              > I had some brood waiting in the hive box. Remember, the wax and brood in the
              > walls will likely not be salvageable. So, having brood waiting for them
              > makes it more likely that the will stay in their new hive rather than
              > absconding.
              >

              >
              > Karon Adams
              >
              > Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)
              >
              > You can send a Rosary to a soldier!
              >
              > www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary
              >
              > www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com
              >

              >
              > From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On
              > Behalf Of bslack007
              > Sent: Monday, April 29, 2013 6:16 PM
              > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [Beekeeping] Bee removal from house
              >

              >
              >   
              >
              > I've been doing bee's a couple of years. I've got a stray colony of bee's in
              > the wall of my house. While this doesn't bother me personally I'm about to
              > sell it and will need them gone.
              >
              > If I'm going to remove them, I'd like to keep them, another hive would be
              > welcome.
              >
              > Not sure where to start, how to make sure I catch the queen, any advice
              > would be welcome!
              >
              > Brian
              >




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            • mdudley
              Another way of locating them would be to turn the heat off (or the air conditioner to cold), then use an infrared thermometer to find the hot spot of their
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 30 10:20 AM
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                Another way of locating them would be to turn the heat off (or the air conditioner to cold), then use an infrared thermometer to find the hot spot of their brood nest. If there is insulation between them and one of the walls, you may have to do it on the outside instead of the inside.

                Marshall

                Marshall

                --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Crzy-Pony <crzybishma@...> wrote:
                >
                > The shop vac by itself is to harsh and will kill them, on line you will find directions for a Bee vac,its worth building.To help locate them you might use a glass pressed to the wall or a stethoscope. listen for the heaviest/loudest sound when you tap on the wall. Once you figure out where they are congregated go to work in your bee suit, and hopefully in a closed room.
                > good luck let us know how you make out.
                > Marlene   
                >
                > --- On Mon, 4/29/13, bslack007 <bslack007@...> wrote:
                >
                > From: bslack007 <bslack007@...>
                > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Bee removal from house
                > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Monday, April 29, 2013, 9:28 PM
                >
                > I've seen them in the same spot before.  In years past they've vanished within a few weeks, but not this time.
                >
                > Is there a preferred method? Just open it up and start cutting? I've considered using a shop vac, but it seems like it would injure them.
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "karon" <karon@> wrote:
                > >
                > > They need to come out whether you are selling the house, or not. If they are
                > > left there, over time, the honey and wax can damage the house.
                > >
                > > 
                > >
                > > That said, removing them will be as easy or as hard as its location. If they
                > > are located close to a window or door, that makes it easier. If nowhere near
                > > such things, that makes it harder. You are probably going to have to remove
                > > significant segments of the structure of the wall. Carefully, of course.
                > >
                > > 
                > >
                > > You may not find the queen, at all. When my father and I used to do this, we
                > > gathered as many of the bees as we could but, you probably won't find the
                > > queen. Or, she may be lost in the deconstruction process.
                > >
                > > 
                > >
                > > Whatever you do, you'll have to repair the wall and find their doorway to
                > > make sure it is closed to future swarms. Once that scent is in the space,
                > > future swarms will hone in on it. The most important thing is to clean it
                > > ALL out.
                > >
                > > 
                > >
                > > You might want to have a hive body with plenty of frames ready when you open
                > > the wall. I have also had good luck when clearing a building by maki9ng sure
                > > I had some brood waiting in the hive box. Remember, the wax and brood in the
                > > walls will likely not be salvageable. So, having brood waiting for them
                > > makes it more likely that the will stay in their new hive rather than
                > > absconding.
                > >
                > > 
                > >
                > > Karon Adams
                > >
                > > Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)
                > >
                > > You can send a Rosary to a soldier!
                > >
                > > www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary
                > >
                > > www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com
                > >
                > > 
                > >
                > > From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On
                > > Behalf Of bslack007
                > > Sent: Monday, April 29, 2013 6:16 PM
                > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                > > Subject: [Beekeeping] Bee removal from house
                > >
                > > 
                > >
                > >   
                > >
                > > I've been doing bee's a couple of years. I've got a stray colony of bee's in
                > > the wall of my house. While this doesn't bother me personally I'm about to
                > > sell it and will need them gone.
                > >
                > > If I'm going to remove them, I'd like to keep them, another hive would be
                > > welcome.
                > >
                > > Not sure where to start, how to make sure I catch the queen, any advice
                > > would be welcome!
                > >
                > > Brian
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
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