Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Spy Camera

Expand Messages
  • mdudley
    Anyone using these for watching their hive(s)? I like to keep an eye on the hive, but it is almost 100 in the back, and when I get close enough to watch for
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 22, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Anyone using these for watching their hive(s)? I like to keep an eye on the hive, but it is almost 100' in the back, and when I get close enough to watch for what pollen is being brought in, they can get a little defensive. Seems a camera on the entrance might be exactly what I need. Only problem might be that there would be an insufficient depth of field.

      Marshall


      http://www.amazon.com/Birdhouse-Spy-Cam-Birdwatching-Camera/dp/B001R1NGEI/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1366672112&sr=8-4&keywords=bird+camera+wireless
    • Jorg Kewisch
      I don t have a bird watching camera, but an inspection camera. http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200512626_200512626 It plugs into the usb port of
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 23, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I don't have a bird watching camera, but an inspection camera.

        http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200512626_200512626

        It plugs into the usb port of my lap top computer. I insert the neck
        into the hive entrance and scan the bottom of the frames for queen
        cells. After 2 minutes the camera is covered with attacking bees, but
        they do that inside the hive. Only when I pull the camera out they
        notice that I am attached to the other end and I have to walk away until
        they lose interest.
        The camera might also be good for finding bees inside walls.

        I sit often about 3 feet from my hive (not in the flight path) and
        watch. They totally ignore me. If your bees don't like that maybe you
        should requeen.

        Jorg



        On 04/22/2013 07:15 PM, mdudley@... wrote:
        > Anyone using these for watching their hive(s)? I like to keep an eye on
        > the hive, but it is almost 100' in the back, and when I get close enough
        > to watch for what pollen is being brought in, they can get a little
        > defensive. Seems a camera on the entrance might be exactly what I need.
        > Only problem might be that there would be an insufficient depth of field.
        >
        > Marshall
      • mdudley
        Well, actually the only time I have had one come after me was the day after I had gotten a nuc, and I had a Boardman feeder in the entrance and they were
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 23, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Well, actually the only time I have had one come after me was the day after I had gotten a nuc, and I had a Boardman feeder in the entrance and they were getting robbed. Between that, and finding that 90% of their hive was somewhere else, they were a little defensive. Not so much any more it seems.

          The bees are the queen's sisters, not daughters. It will be a few weeks before I find out how her daughters are, especially since she was open mated.

          Marshall


          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Jorg Kewisch <jorg@...> wrote:
          >

          > I sit often about 3 feet from my hive (not in the flight path) and
          > watch. They totally ignore me. If your bees don't like that maybe you
          > should requeen.
          >
          > Jorg
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.