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Re: [Beekeeping] Uncapping frames

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  • Thomas Powell
    This is the best I have used or seen so far. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdJpbV9YnYk&sns=em Thomas
    Message 1 of 13 , Apr 6, 2013
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      This is the best I have used or seen so far. 


      Thomas

      On Apr 6, 2013, at 18:55, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:

       

      >>>  ... pros and cons regarding uncapping frames using heat Blow dryer versus a knife?

      melting point range of 62 to 64 °C (144 to 147 °F).
      Commercial bottlers heat up to 150º for a very short period of time.  Remember, 144 to 147º just barely gets the wax melted.  Heating the honey right underneath the wax cappings is going to ruin the taste.  Had not heard of melting wax cappings to open the comb up for extraction.

      Mike in LA

    • Stephen Hart
      Does anyone feel that removing the caps with a heated uncapping knife negatively impacts the taste of the honey? I ve used the comb and the heated knife and
      Message 2 of 13 , Apr 7, 2013
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        Does anyone feel that removing the caps with a heated uncapping knife negatively impacts the taste of the honey? I've used the comb and the heated knife and have seen people use an electric reciprocating serrated knife. Anything better out there?
        --
        Sent from my Android phone with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
      • LINDA PICAZO
        heating the honey rids of its nutritional value Linda Picazo linda_diana1@yahoo.com   ... From: Mike S Subject: Re: [Beekeeping]
        Message 3 of 13 , Apr 7, 2013
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          heating the honey rids of its nutritional value

          Linda Picazo
          linda_diana1@...
           


          --- On Sat, 4/6/13, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:

          From: Mike S <mws1112004@...>
          Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Uncapping frames
          To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, April 6, 2013, 8:55 PM

           
          >>>  ... pros and cons regarding uncapping frames using heat Blow dryer versus a knife?

          melting point range of 62 to 64 °C (144 to 147 °F).
          Commercial bottlers heat up to 150º for a very short period of time.  Remember, 144 to 147º just barely gets the wax melted.  Heating the honey right underneath the wax cappings is going to ruin the taste.  Had not heard of melting wax cappings to open the comb up for extraction.

          Mike in LA
        • Thomas Janstrom
          The method being discussed involves heating the capping wax to just on its melting point, the honey in the cell never goes above the 65-70C (148-158F), if it
          Message 4 of 13 , Apr 7, 2013
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            The method being discussed involves heating the capping wax to just on its melting point, the honey in the cell never goes above the 65-70C (148-158F), if it even gets close is a bigger question. honey doesn't heat fast, it has a lot of thermal inertia/mass so would tend to stay close to the original temperature of the frame anyway. This is just like using a heated knife to uncap with.....

            Cheers, Thomas.

            On 8/04/2013 5:02 AM, LINDA PICAZO wrote:
             

            heating the honey rids of its nutritional value

            Linda Picazo
             


            --- On Sat, 4/6/13, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:

            From: Mike S <mws1112004@...>
            Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Uncapping frames
            To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, April 6, 2013, 8:55 PM

             
            >>>  ... pros and cons regarding uncapping frames using heat Blow dryer versus a knife?

            melting point range of 62 to 64 °C (144 to 147 °F).
            Commercial bottlers heat up to 150º for a very short period of time.  Remember, 144 to 147º just barely gets the wax melted.  Heating the honey right underneath the wax cappings is going to ruin the taste.  Had not heard of melting wax cappings to open the comb up for extraction.

            Mike in LA


          • husztek
            Not to bee too contentious on this point. Someone please, tell me how the cell wax and honey know not to get too hot? A capping knife goes through quickly,
            Message 5 of 13 , Apr 7, 2013
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              Not to bee too contentious on this point.
              Someone please, tell me how the cell wax and honey know not to get too hot?

              A capping knife goes through quickly, cuts and it is gone.
              A hair dryer?
              Sounds intriguing, but I don't have one.
              I guess you need to try it out and tell the rest of us about it.
              After all, nothing ventured, . . .

              Thanks,

              Bill

              ---- On Sun, 07 Apr 2013 15:30:23 -0700 Thomas Janstrom<t_janstrom@...> wrote ----

               

              The method being discussed involves heating the capping wax to just on its melting point, the honey in the cell never goes above the 65-70C (148-158F), if it even gets close is a bigger question. honey doesn't heat fast, it has a lot of thermal inertia/mass so would tend to stay close to the original temperature of the frame anyway. This is just like using a heated knife to uncap with.....

              Cheers, Thomas.

              On 8/04/2013 5:02 AM, LINDA PICAZO wrote:
              5361328.91026.YahooMailClassic@..." type="cite">  

              heating the honey rids of its nutritional value

              Linda Picazo
               


              --- On Sat, 4/6/13, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:

              From: Mike S <mws1112004@...>
              Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Uncapping frames
              To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Saturday, April 6, 2013, 8:55 PM

               
              >>>  ... pros and cons regarding uncapping frames using heat Blow dryer versus a knife?

              melting point range of 62 to 64 °C (144 to 147 °F).
              Commercial bottlers heat up to 150º for a very short period of time.  Remember, 144 to 147º just barely gets the wax melted.  Heating the honey right underneath the wax cappings is going to ruin the taste.  Had not heard of melting wax cappings to open the comb up for extraction.

              Mike in LA





              Bill Husztek
              Black Squirrel Cottage Enterprises
              7558 Marshall Drive
              Annandale, VA 22003
              703-573-8842
            • Thomas Janstrom
              They don t, they both rely on the operator of the hairdrier to move the stream of hot air as soon as the capping wax melts. There are numerous videos on
              Message 6 of 13 , Apr 8, 2013
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                They don't, they both rely on the operator of the hairdrier to move the stream of  hot air as soon as the capping wax melts. There are numerous videos on youtube that show this being done. I'd have to say it doesn't look to be the fastest way, but on the upside there are no cappings to process later, so maybe it works out?

                Just one example of the types of videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RCsBJ25ZXg

                Oh one thing, never done it this way myself (have a electric capping knife).....

                Cheers, Thomas.

                On 8/04/2013 9:18 AM, husztek wrote:
                 
                Not to bee too contentious on this point.
                Someone please, tell me how the cell wax and honey know not to get too hot?

                A capping knife goes through quickly, cuts and it is gone.
                A hair dryer?
                Sounds intriguing, but I don't have one.
                I guess you need to try it out and tell the rest of us about it.
                After all, nothing ventured, . . .

                Thanks,

                Bill

                ---- On Sun, 07 Apr 2013 15:30:23 -0700 Thomas Janstrom<t_janstrom@...> wrote ----

                 

                The method being discussed involves heating the capping wax to just on its melting point, the honey in the cell never goes above the 65-70C (148-158F), if it even gets close is a bigger question. honey doesn't heat fast, it has a lot of thermal inertia/mass so would tend to stay close to the original temperature of the frame anyway. This is just like using a heated knife to uncap with.....

                Cheers, Thomas.

                On 8/04/2013 5:02 AM, LINDA PICAZO wrote:
                5361328.91026.YahooMailClassic@..." type="cite">  

                heating the honey rids of its nutritional value

                Linda Picazo
                 


                --- On Sat, 4/6/13, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:

                From: Mike S <mws1112004@...>
                Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Uncapping frames
                To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Saturday, April 6, 2013, 8:55 PM

                 
                >>>  ... pros and cons regarding uncapping frames using heat Blow dryer versus a knife?

                melting point range of 62 to 64 °C (144 to 147 °F).
                Commercial bottlers heat up to 150º for a very short period of time.  Remember, 144 to 147º just barely gets the wax melted.  Heating the honey right underneath the wax cappings is going to ruin the taste.  Had not heard of melting wax cappings to open the comb up for extraction.

                Mike in LA




                Bill Husztek
                Black Squirrel Cottage Enterprises
                7558 Marshall Drive
                Annandale, VA 22003
                703-573-8842

              • Jorg Kewisch
                Beekeepers have experimented for a long time with this. A heated knife will use about 50 Watts of electricity, a blower uses 400 Watts (both estimates). An
                Message 7 of 13 , Apr 8, 2013
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                  Beekeepers have experimented for a long time with this. A heated knife
                  will use about 50 Watts of electricity, a blower uses 400 Watts (both
                  estimates). An electric (mechinical) knife will gunk up after a short
                  time and has to be cleaned a lot.
                  So the commercial beekeeper will stick to the heated knife. (does
                  anybody know how hot the knife edge gets?). The hobbyist can still
                  experiment.
                  What about a computer controlled laser? Remember the Goldfinger movie?

                  Jorg

                  On 04/07/2013 06:30 PM, Thomas Janstrom wrote:
                  > The method being discussed involves heating the capping wax to just on
                  > its melting point, the honey in the cell never goes above the 65-70C
                  > (148-158F), if it even gets close is a bigger question. honey doesn't
                  > heat fast, it has a lot of thermal inertia/mass so would tend to stay
                  > close to the original temperature of the frame anyway. This is just like
                  > using a heated knife to uncap with.....
                  >
                  > Cheers, Thomas.
                • Mike S
                  ... the fastest way, but on the upside there are no cappings to process later, .... So, what happens to the melted wax?  How much gets into the liquid honey?
                  Message 8 of 13 , Apr 8, 2013
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                    >>>   ... it doesn't look to be
                    the fastest way, but on the upside there are no cappings to process later, ....

                    So, what happens to the melted wax?  How much gets into the liquid honey?

                    Mike in LA
                  • Thomas Janstrom
                    When you melt a thin sheet of anything and you start in the middle (it would in any case in this case), surface tension will pull the newly liquid material
                    Message 9 of 13 , Apr 10, 2013
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                      When you melt a thin sheet of anything and you start in the middle (it would in any case in this case), surface tension will pull the newly liquid material away from the melt zone towards the cooler areas. So in this case it will wick towards the edges of the cell leaving the honey clean and uncapped.

                      I don't know how the bees deal with the rounded lip on the edge of the cell when the frame is reused though.

                      Thomas.

                      On 9/04/2013 11:14 AM, Mike S wrote:
                       

                      >>>   ... it doesn't look to be the fastest way, but on the upside there are no cappings to process later, ....

                      So, what happens to the melted wax?  How much gets into the liquid honey?

                      Mike in LA


                    • Mike S
                      ... melt zone towards the cooler areas. So in this case it will wick towards the edges of the cell leaving the honey clean and uncapped. So you are saying that
                      Message 10 of 13 , Apr 10, 2013
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                        >>>  surface tension will pull the newly liquid material away from the
                        melt zone towards the cooler areas. So in this case it will wick towards the edges of the cell leaving the honey clean and uncapped.

                        So you are saying that the melted wax will resolidify on the top edges of the cell cup?  You have used this process to uncap honey for extraction?  If so, have you ever noticed a skim of wax on the top of the honey when it's stored?

                        Mike in LA
                      • Matt Tucker
                        I just don t like the idea of using heat of any kind if I can help it. Raw and natural is best. Matt Uncapping frames Sat Apr 6, 2013 6:21 pm (PDT) . Posted
                        Message 11 of 13 , Apr 18, 2013
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                          I just don't like the idea of using heat of any kind if I can help it. Raw and natural is best.
                           
                          Matt
                           
                           
                          Uncapping frames Sat Apr 6, 2013 6:21 pm (PDT) . Posted by: "Daryl" pastordarylmiller What are the pros and cons regarding uncapping frames using heat Blow dryer versus a knife? Can you use any blowdryer or do you need something that gets up to a certain temperature?
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