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Re: How many hives?

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  • Bill
    It s not Foulbrood, sorry. I should have said wax moth. I found a lot of webbing in that empty hive. But I didn t find larvae. Still, I m fairly sure it s wax
    Message 1 of 24 , Apr 2, 2013
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      It's not Foulbrood, sorry. I should have said wax moth. I found a lot of webbing in that empty hive. But I didn't find larvae.

      Still, I'm fairly sure it's wax moth. I'm going to start over with new equipment anyway.

      Mike, I'm not good enough to spot where the current queen is inside the surviving hive. I know she's in there because she's producing large amounts of new brood. But if I mistakingly remove her from her current hive, I'll destroy one or two in the process.

      She is not marked. This was a feral hive that survived the fall and winter months.

      Bill

      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:
      >
      > >>>   I lost one to CCD or possibly Foulbrood last year.
      > >>>    ... going to swarm at some point. When it does, that will provide me with my second colony,
      >
      > Point 1    Foulbrood.  You HAVE to know if it's foulbrood or not.  If it's foulbrood you need to burn all the equipment inside the hive - frames, comb, whatever.  And you have to char the inside of the boxes, the bottom board, and inner and outer cover where the bees come in contact inside the hive.   If you install more bees on equipment that's not been thoroughly heat treated you are going to have another case of foulbrood, loose your new colony of bees, and wasted a season your bees could have used building up.  Get help in determining the cause you lost your lost colony.  Find a really good beekeeper to help you with this determination.  If you have a state bee inspector, see if you can get him or her to help you determine the cause of your hive's demise.
      >
      > Point 2  Swarm.  Don't let the colony swarm.  Don't know what the chances are for you to catch the swarm if it issues from you colony but they aren't good.  Split your colony now.  It's called a walkaway split.  Divide the colony in half with the split even between the two colonies.  Just make sure that if you have swarm cells, you place a frame with swarm cells in each of the new colonies.  If you don't have queen cells, make sure you place a frame containing eggs in each of the splits.  Three days after making the split, go in and look at both colonies.  The one with the queen will have eggs and newly hatched brood.  The one without will have built queen cells.  If there is a mix of capped and uncapped queen cells, tear down the capped cells.  The queens in those cells will have been raised from older larvae than the larvae in the uncapped cells and won't make as good a queen as any raised in the uncapped queen cells.
      >
      > Good luck with your bees.
      >
      > Mike in LA
      >
    • Ruary Rudd
      Yes the presence of webbing indicates that wax moths have entered the hive, BUT it does not mean that that was the cause of the colony death. Unless you have
      Message 2 of 24 , Apr 3, 2013
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        Yes the presence of webbing indicates that wax moths have entered the hive, BUT it does not mean that that was the cause of the colony death. Unless you have definitely ruled it out Foul Brood is still in the running.
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Bill
        Sent: 03 April 2013 01:20
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: How many hives?

        It's not Foulbrood, sorry. I should have said wax moth. I found a lot of webbing in that empty hive. But I didn't find larvae.

        Still, I'm fairly sure it's wax moth. I'm going to start over with new equipment anyway.

        Mike, I'm not good enough to spot where the current queen is inside the surviving hive. I know she's in there because she's producing large amounts of new Bill

      • Richard Sullivan
        You would probably know you had foul brood because it stinks. If it doesn t stink you are probably fine. You don t need to get new equipment just because you
        Message 3 of 24 , Apr 4, 2013
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          You would probably know you had foul brood because it stinks. If it doesn't stink you are probably fine. You don't need to get new equipment just because you  have wax moths. Just clean out the webs and larvae and when you put new bees in that box they will clean it right up. 

          Richard






          On Apr 3, 2013, at 12:05 AM, "Ruary Rudd" <ruaryrudd@...> wrote:

           

          Yes the presence of webbing indicates that wax moths have entered the hive, BUT it does not mean that that was the cause of the colony death. Unless you have definitely ruled it out Foul Brood is still in the running.
          -----Original Message-----
          From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Bill
          Sent: 03 April 2013 01:20
          To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: How many hives?

          It's not Foulbrood, sorry. I should have said wax moth. I found a lot of webbing in that empty hive. But I didn't find larvae.

          Still, I'm fairly sure it's wax moth. I'm going to start over with new equipment anyway.

          Mike, I'm not good enough to spot where the current queen is inside the surviving hive. I know she's in there because she's producing large amounts of new Bill

        • Richard Sullivan
          You probably don t have foulbrood. You would notice a horrible stench- hence Foul Also you don t need to change equipment because you have wax moths.
          Message 4 of 24 , Apr 4, 2013
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            You probably don't have foulbrood. You would notice a horrible stench- hence " Foul"
            Also you don't need to change equipment because you have wax moths. Just clean up webs and larvae and when you put new bees in the box they will clean it right up. Remember drawn comb is a valuable resource.
            Your colony probably died as a result of varroa mites. They can't survive unless there is brood so no worries there either.

            Richard
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