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Re: Hive Splitting: Simple or Complicated? The Fat Beekeeper

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  • mdudley
    Why cannot one simply make sure both boxes have either eggs or less than 3 day old larvae? That seems a lot simpler. If both boxes have eggs/young larvae, it
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 14, 2013
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      Why cannot one simply make sure both boxes have either eggs or less than 3 day old larvae? That seems a lot simpler. If both boxes have eggs/young larvae, it should not matter which got the queen.

      Marshall

      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Kewisch, Jorg" <jorg@...> wrote:
      >
      > Jim,
      >
      > the best time to split a hive is in May or June (the time when bees swarm). Splitting too early is bad. The bees need eggs or young larva to make a new queen, so when you split make sure that the hive without queen has those.
      > Starting the end of april you inspect the hive every 7-10 days and look for queen cells. If you find those it is time to split and you put those frames into one hive and the queen into the other.
      > Otherwise split in the end of May. If you don't find the queen you put a queen excluder between the brood boxes. After 4 days you split and look for eggs. That tells you where the queen is. You take that frame, shake all bees off and give it to the other box.
      > Make sure both boxes have some honey and pollen and capped brood.
      > If you find the queen make her with a paint pen. You need to be careful not to kill her in the process, so practice on some drones (they don't sting, the queen can sting but usually does not)
      >
      > Jorg
      > ________________________________________
      > From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of James [jaimesbeam@...]
      > Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 7:44 PM
      > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Beekeeping] Hive Splitting: Simple or Complicated? The Fat Beekeeper
      >
      > I watched a bunch of videos by "The Fat BeeKeeper/Guy" on YouTube.
      > He was talking about how easy it was to split hives. He says you don't
      > need to find the queen, or get another queen or anything like that.
      >
      > He says you just need to split up the brood and bees, and the hive without
      > a queen will make a new queen. I think you need to make sure you get
      > some nurse bees in each hive that can't fly back to the original hive.
      > I don't know where/if you should move the hives.
      >
      > I also don't know when to split hives. I imagine some time in spring.
      > Of course I'm in Maine...
      >
      > He also shows how to raise queens in any hive where you've removed
      > the queen. It basically amounts to that bees will raise a queen out of any
      > larva in a vertically hanging cell (opening own)
      >
      > What to you think?
      >
      > Thanks, Jim in Maine
      >
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