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RE: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping

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  • Kewisch, Jorg
    Ann, The bees fly up to two miles away from the hive and visit 2 million flowers for 1 pound of honey. So it will not make a big difference what you plant
    Message 1 of 23 , Mar 13, 2013
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      Ann,

      The bees fly up to two miles away from the hive and visit 2 million flowers for 1 pound of honey. So it will not make a big difference what you plant in your yard. Something that blooms early is always good.
      "feeding the bees" usually means to give them sugar syrup.
      Check with your local beekeeping club if they have classes, not only for the learning but also for the people you will meet.

      Jorg
      ________________________________________
      From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of glass71909 [glass71909@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 2:47 PM
      To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping

      I'm so excited! Next week, an experienced bee keeper is bringing out bees. He also removes africanized bees, so has lost some of his hives, which he thinks is due to chemicals left on his truck, so he's bringing out more hives than I eventually want.

      I don't mind that as, he's going to give me a great deal. I know I will need to feed them, but would like some advice on what flowers to put out that will help them. I have some fruit trees and roses, and plan on nasturiums. Wisteria will start now and there's clover. It's still cool here, so I'm putting more clover and vetch seed in the pasture. There's no other bees in the area, so they will have neighbors to forage on, too.

      I have a large pond, so they have an adequate water source.

      Thanks,
      Ann
    • Mike S
      ... Normally speaking, you won t be able to plant enough flowers to really help feed the bees.  If you had a couple of acres of say, Dutch clover, crimson
      Message 2 of 23 , Mar 14, 2013
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        >>>    would like some advice on what flowers to put out that will help them.   (Help feed the bees)

        Normally speaking, you won't be able to plant enough flowers to really help feed the bees.  If you had a couple of acres of say, Dutch clover, crimson clover, sunflowers; then that might help.  But even for one colony, it's difficult for a person to plant enough flowers to make a significant difference.   One consideration, however, would be to plant all your roadsides within a two mile radius with one or both of the clovers mentioned above.  Hairy vetch would also work well in that respect.  That would be a couple of hundred pounds of seed.  BTW, you didn't mention your location and that makes a difference as well.  The clovers mentioned above will work just all over the U.S., just about.  Won't work in all areas.  Sweet clover will work in the northern parts of the U.S.  Check with your county extension agent.  Will conclude by saying it's hard to plant enough flowers to really make a difference for bees unless you undertake mass plantings.   Good luck.

        Mike in LA

      • karon
        If he wants to kill the Africanized without chemicals, tell him to try just soapy water. I have used it for years with bees hanging around the location of a
        Message 3 of 23 , Mar 16, 2013
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          If he wants to kill the Africanized without chemicals, tell him to try just soapy water. I have used it for years with bees hanging around the location of a moved hive and killing off Fire Ants.

           

          All you need is a store brand dishwashing liquid. The kind for hand washing. For every gallon of water, use one cup of the dish washing liquid. Mix gently to avoid suds. Then, for Africanized bees, you can simply put the mixture in a garden sprayer and spray the hive. The mix kills the bees or fire ants on contact. It does not harm the surrounding vegetation or wild life (other than insects)

           

          This stuff acts on the insect’s exoskeleton like sulfuric acid does on skin.  I really didn’t believe it when I first heard about it. I started using it to kill Fire Ants when I lived in Atlanta.  By the end of the first season, I was astonished at how well it worked!

           

          In a neighborhood where everyone had multiple mounds of ants, we had a clear yard. No one in the area could believe it was as simple as it was. Many would not even try, thinking we simply had some secret method and were keeping it to ourselves. No one could think it was so easy. and yet, it was.

           

          Obviously, when going after Africanized bees, you want to be certain you are well suited but, this really does work. Might need much more for a hive and you’ll have to get it deeply into the hive. But, it can work and it will do less damage to the surrounding area, overall.

           

          I have never dealt with Africanized bees, myself, but I would definitely try this on them if I did. I have used it on Fire Ants and it worked beautifully. It may be worth a try. He’ll know for certain if he wants to try it. but, if it works, it will be much less expensive and better for the surroundings and his other hives, that so many chemicals.

           

          Karon Adams

          Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

          You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

          www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

          www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

           

          From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of glass71909
          Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 2:47 PM
          To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Beekeeping] New to beekeeping

           

           

          I'm so excited! Next week, an experienced bee keeper is bringing out bees. He also removes africanized bees, so has lost some of his hives, which he thinks is due to chemicals left on his truck, so he's bringing out more hives than I eventually want.

          I don't mind that as, he's going to give me a great deal. I know I will need to feed them, but would like some advice on what flowers to put out that will help them. I have some fruit trees and roses, and plan on nasturiums. Wisteria will start now and there's clover. It's still cool here, so I'm putting more clover and vetch seed in the pasture. There's no other bees in the area, so they will have neighbors to forage on, too.

          I have a large pond, so they have an adequate water source.

          Thanks,
          Ann

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