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Hive Splitting: Simple or Complicated? The Fat Beekeeper

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  • James
    I watched a bunch of videos by The Fat BeeKeeper/Guy on YouTube. He was talking about how easy it was to split hives. He says you don t need to find the
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 13, 2013
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      I watched a bunch of videos by "The Fat BeeKeeper/Guy" on YouTube.
      He was talking about how easy it was to split hives. He says you don't
      need to find the queen, or get another queen or anything like that.

      He says you just need to split up the brood and bees, and the hive without
      a queen will make a new queen. I think you need to make sure you get
      some nurse bees in each hive that can't fly back to the original hive.
      I don't know where/if you should move the hives.

      I also don't know when to split hives. I imagine some time in spring.
      Of course I'm in Maine...

      He also shows how to raise queens in any hive where you've removed
      the queen. It basically amounts to that bees will raise a queen out of any
      larva in a vertically hanging cell (opening own)

      What to you think?

      Thanks, Jim in Maine
    • Kewisch, Jorg
      Jim, the best time to split a hive is in May or June (the time when bees swarm). Splitting too early is bad. The bees need eggs or young larva to make a new
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 13, 2013
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        Jim,

        the best time to split a hive is in May or June (the time when bees swarm). Splitting too early is bad. The bees need eggs or young larva to make a new queen, so when you split make sure that the hive without queen has those.
        Starting the end of april you inspect the hive every 7-10 days and look for queen cells. If you find those it is time to split and you put those frames into one hive and the queen into the other.
        Otherwise split in the end of May. If you don't find the queen you put a queen excluder between the brood boxes. After 4 days you split and look for eggs. That tells you where the queen is. You take that frame, shake all bees off and give it to the other box.
        Make sure both boxes have some honey and pollen and capped brood.
        If you find the queen make her with a paint pen. You need to be careful not to kill her in the process, so practice on some drones (they don't sting, the queen can sting but usually does not)

        Jorg
        ________________________________________
        From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of James [jaimesbeam@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 7:44 PM
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Beekeeping] Hive Splitting: Simple or Complicated? The Fat Beekeeper

        I watched a bunch of videos by "The Fat BeeKeeper/Guy" on YouTube.
        He was talking about how easy it was to split hives. He says you don't
        need to find the queen, or get another queen or anything like that.

        He says you just need to split up the brood and bees, and the hive without
        a queen will make a new queen. I think you need to make sure you get
        some nurse bees in each hive that can't fly back to the original hive.
        I don't know where/if you should move the hives.

        I also don't know when to split hives. I imagine some time in spring.
        Of course I'm in Maine...

        He also shows how to raise queens in any hive where you've removed
        the queen. It basically amounts to that bees will raise a queen out of any
        larva in a vertically hanging cell (opening own)

        What to you think?

        Thanks, Jim in Maine
      • mdudley
        Why cannot one simply make sure both boxes have either eggs or less than 3 day old larvae? That seems a lot simpler. If both boxes have eggs/young larvae, it
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 14, 2013
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          Why cannot one simply make sure both boxes have either eggs or less than 3 day old larvae? That seems a lot simpler. If both boxes have eggs/young larvae, it should not matter which got the queen.

          Marshall

          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Kewisch, Jorg" <jorg@...> wrote:
          >
          > Jim,
          >
          > the best time to split a hive is in May or June (the time when bees swarm). Splitting too early is bad. The bees need eggs or young larva to make a new queen, so when you split make sure that the hive without queen has those.
          > Starting the end of april you inspect the hive every 7-10 days and look for queen cells. If you find those it is time to split and you put those frames into one hive and the queen into the other.
          > Otherwise split in the end of May. If you don't find the queen you put a queen excluder between the brood boxes. After 4 days you split and look for eggs. That tells you where the queen is. You take that frame, shake all bees off and give it to the other box.
          > Make sure both boxes have some honey and pollen and capped brood.
          > If you find the queen make her with a paint pen. You need to be careful not to kill her in the process, so practice on some drones (they don't sting, the queen can sting but usually does not)
          >
          > Jorg
          > ________________________________________
          > From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of James [jaimesbeam@...]
          > Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 7:44 PM
          > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Beekeeping] Hive Splitting: Simple or Complicated? The Fat Beekeeper
          >
          > I watched a bunch of videos by "The Fat BeeKeeper/Guy" on YouTube.
          > He was talking about how easy it was to split hives. He says you don't
          > need to find the queen, or get another queen or anything like that.
          >
          > He says you just need to split up the brood and bees, and the hive without
          > a queen will make a new queen. I think you need to make sure you get
          > some nurse bees in each hive that can't fly back to the original hive.
          > I don't know where/if you should move the hives.
          >
          > I also don't know when to split hives. I imagine some time in spring.
          > Of course I'm in Maine...
          >
          > He also shows how to raise queens in any hive where you've removed
          > the queen. It basically amounts to that bees will raise a queen out of any
          > larva in a vertically hanging cell (opening own)
          >
          > What to you think?
          >
          > Thanks, Jim in Maine
          >
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