Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Storing Supers with Honey and Moth Crystals

Expand Messages
  • mdudley
    ... If you have had them all winter and no moths have shown up, then you are likely safe if you do nothing more than put them in a plastic garbage bag and seal
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 26 12:30 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "bslack007" <bslack007@...> wrote:
      >
      > Over the winter I've lost all of the bee's in both of my hives. In one hive they vanished without a trace and the other it looked as if they were being robbed when I discovered them gone.
      >
      > As they were already being robbed I left the supers out to be cleaned off before putting them in storage until the spring.
      >
      > Today I went down to retrieve them and put them in storage and found a super that was about half full of honey. I don't own an extractor of my own and can't get it out easily.
      >
      > Is it okay for me to store this super in a bag with the moth crystals and then add it to the fresh bee package I've ordered this spring?
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Brian

      If you have had them all winter and no moths have shown up, then you are likely safe if you do nothing more than put them in a plastic garbage bag and seal them up. Put them in the freezer for a few days if you want to make sure.

      > Knoxville, TN
      >
      Marshall
      Also Knoxville TN
    • linda_diana1
      A lady told me at the bee club last week they store their frames of honey in the freezer intil spring, they have alot of hives and have lost some bees this
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 24, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        A lady told me at the bee club last week they store their frames of honey in the freezer intil spring, they have alot of hives and have lost some bees this winter. she says they store frames in freezer alot until its warm enough to get the honey out. she said it didnt hurt the honey: however if you put honey in a fridge it will cristlize faster.
        --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, mdudley@... wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "bslack007" <bslack007@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Over the winter I've lost all of the bee's in both of my hives. In one hive they vanished without a trace and the other it looked as if they were being robbed when I discovered them gone.
        > >
        > > As they were already being robbed I left the supers out to be cleaned off before putting them in storage until the spring.
        > >
        > > Today I went down to retrieve them and put them in storage and found a super that was about half full of honey. I don't own an extractor of my own and can't get it out easily.
        > >
        > > Is it okay for me to store this super in a bag with the moth crystals and then add it to the fresh bee package I've ordered this spring?
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > > Brian
        >
        > If you have had them all winter and no moths have shown up, then you are likely safe if you do nothing more than put them in a plastic garbage bag and seal them up. Put them in the freezer for a few days if you want to make sure.
        >
        > > Knoxville, TN
        > >
        > Marshall
        > Also Knoxville TN
        >
      • mdudley
        You can put honey in the freezer for 48 hours, then take it out and put in a SEALED container, or even a sealed garbage bag. The freezing kills any hive
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 25, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          You can put honey in the freezer for 48 hours, then take it out and put in a SEALED container, or even a sealed garbage bag. The freezing kills any hive beetle or wax moth eggs (or larvae), and if you seal it off no more can be laid. However small wax moths and beetles are really good at getting into things so you have to make very sure it is sealed well. Also it is wise to add a descendant if placed in something completely sealed to the air or make sure the frames are room temperature and dry before placing in container as any moisture can cause it to mold.

          Marshall

          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "linda_diana1" <linda_diana1@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > A lady told me at the bee club last week they store their frames of honey in the freezer intil spring, they have alot of hives and have lost some bees this winter. she says they store frames in freezer alot until its warm enough to get the honey out. she said it didnt hurt the honey: however if you put honey in a fridge it will cristlize faster.
          > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, mdudley@ wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "bslack007" <bslack007@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Over the winter I've lost all of the bee's in both of my hives. In one hive they vanished without a trace and the other it looked as if they were being robbed when I discovered them gone.
          > > >
          > > > As they were already being robbed I left the supers out to be cleaned off before putting them in storage until the spring.
          > > >
          > > > Today I went down to retrieve them and put them in storage and found a super that was about half full of honey. I don't own an extractor of my own and can't get it out easily.
          > > >
          > > > Is it okay for me to store this super in a bag with the moth crystals and then add it to the fresh bee package I've ordered this spring?
          > > >
          > > > Thanks,
          > > > Brian
          > >
          > > If you have had them all winter and no moths have shown up, then you are likely safe if you do nothing more than put them in a plastic garbage bag and seal them up. Put them in the freezer for a few days if you want to make sure.
          > >
          > > > Knoxville, TN
          > > >
          > > Marshall
          > > Also Knoxville TN
          > >
          >
        • Gary Ilmanen
          Be careful using garbage bags... some of them have insecticides added to prevent bugginess. ... -- Terms of Use: I am an Attorney-at-Law, licensed to practice
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 25, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Be careful using garbage bags... some of them have insecticides added to prevent bugginess.


            On Mon, Mar 25, 2013 at 8:28 AM, <mdudley@...> wrote:
             

            You can put honey in the freezer for 48 hours, then take it out and put in a SEALED container, or even a sealed garbage bag.



            --

            Terms of Use:  I am an Attorney-at-Law, licensed to practice law only in the state of California.  Unless we have both signed a formal retainer agreement, you are not my client, and my discussion of issues does not constitute legal advice.  There is a risk that employers and other third parties could read unencrypted e-Mail.  You should also know that under Presidential Executive Order, the National Security Agency or the Department of Homeland Security might read this e-Mail without warning, warrant, or notice. This e-Mail might contain information that is legally privileged attorney-client communication, attorney work product, proprietary, or otherwise protected by law from disclosure.  e-Mail is intended solely for the use of the recipient(s) named in the header. If you are not that person, you are hereby notified that reading, copying or distributing the contents of this e-Mail is prohibited.  If you have received this e-Mail in error, please immediately notify me and destroy all copies.  Unintended transmissions shall not constitute waiver of the attorney-client or any other privilege. Unless expressly stated to the contrary in this e-mail, nothing herein should be construed as a digital or electronic signature. Unauthorized interception of this e-mail is a criminal violation of Federal Law.  Opinions expressed herein are those of the author, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of those who hold other opinions.

          • Mike S
            ... If you will put the frames in the garbage bags and then into the freezer, leaving them enclosed and sealed, you can store the frames at room temperature
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 25, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              >>>   ... put honey (and pollen in the comb) in the freezer for 48 hours, then take it out and put in a SEALED container, or even a sealed garbage bag.

              If you will put the frames in the garbage bags and then into the freezer, leaving them enclosed and sealed, you can store the frames at room temperature until needed.  Don't open the bag until everything has reached ambient temperature though so moisture won't condense on the cold frames and comb and cause mold and mildew problems later on.  Might help to run a dehumidifier on the open combs before storing them at room temperature to reduce the moisture content of any uncapped dilute nectar to prevent fermentation.

              Mike in LA
            • mdudley
              I was unaware of that. Do you know which brands, or how to tell? Also I forgot, no matter how well you have it sealed, if rodents, mainly mice, chipmunks or
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 25, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                I was unaware of that. Do you know which brands, or how to tell?

                Also I forgot, no matter how well you have it sealed, if rodents, mainly mice, chipmunks or flying squirrels can get to it, they will quickly make a chew in the bag and make a real mess.

                Marshall

                --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Gary Ilmanen <snick001@...> wrote:
                >
                > Be careful using garbage bags... some of them have insecticides added to
                > prevent bugginess.
                >
                >
                > On Mon, Mar 25, 2013 at 8:28 AM, <mdudley@...> wrote:
                >
                > > **
                > >
                > >
                > > You can put honey in the freezer for 48 hours, then take it out and put in
                > > a SEALED container, or even a sealed garbage bag.
                > >
                > >
                >
                > --
                >
                > Terms of Use: I am an Attorney-at-Law, licensed to practice law only in
                > the state of California. *Unless we have both signed a formal retainer
                > agreement, you are not my client, and my discussion of issues does not
                > constitute legal advice*. There is a risk that employers and other third
                > parties could read unencrypted e-Mail. You should also know that under
                > Presidential Executive Order, the National Security Agency or the
                > Department of Homeland Security might read this e-Mail without warning,
                > warrant, or notice. This e-Mail might contain information that is legally
                > privileged attorney-client communication, attorney work product,
                > proprietary, or otherwise protected by law from disclosure. e-Mail is
                > intended solely for the use of the recipient(s) named in the header. If you
                > are not that person, you are hereby notified that reading, copying or
                > distributing the contents of this e-Mail is prohibited. If you have
                > received this e-Mail in error, please immediately notify me and destroy all
                > copies. Unintended transmissions shall not constitute waiver of the
                > attorney-client or any other privilege. Unless expressly stated to the
                > contrary in this e-mail, nothing herein should be construed as a digital or
                > electronic signature. Unauthorized interception of this e-mail is a
                > criminal violation of Federal Law. Opinions expressed herein are those of
                > the author, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of those who hold
                > other opinions.
                >
              • Gary Ilmanen
                No, the warning was in a book I read about dressing out turkeys and such. I ll see if I can research it a bit.
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 25, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  No, the warning was in a book I read about dressing out turkeys and such.  I'll see if I can research it a bit.


                  On Mon, Mar 25, 2013 at 7:07 PM, <mdudley@...> wrote:
                   

                  I was unaware of that. Do you know which brands, or how to tell?

                • mdudley
                  I spent a good bit of time trying to find this information on the net. I found a few brands which said they did, but could find none that said they did not.
                  Message 8 of 14 , Mar 26, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I spent a good bit of time trying to find this information on the net. I found a few brands which said they did, but could find none that said they did not. I finally bit the bullet and called Hefty/Reynolds and talked to their representative and was told that none of the Hefty bags contain any pesticides or insecticides.

                    I had been using the Kroger bags (cheaper) but know from experience that if you call them their automatic answer to questions is usually that it is proprietary information ( like ask them who supplies their fake honey and that is what they say ), so I will be making sure I use a pesticide free one next winter.

                    To eliminate moisture if storing comb which has any uncapped nector in it, use silica gel. These are available in packets, or you can buy in bulk, and put it into a cloth bag. They can generally be reused by baking in the oven to drive the moisture out. Gel absorbs about 40% of its weight in water, so a 10 gram packet will absorb about 4 grams of water, which is around one teaspoon.

                    Thanks for the heads up.

                    Marshall

                    --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Gary Ilmanen <snick001@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > No, the warning was in a book I read about dressing out turkeys and such.
                    > I'll see if I can research it a bit.
                    >
                    >
                    > On Mon, Mar 25, 2013 at 7:07 PM, <mdudley@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > **
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > I was unaware of that. Do you know which brands, or how to tell?
                    > >
                    >
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.