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Bees 'pick up electric signals'

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  • Charles Walter
    Tests revealed that bees can distinguish between different floral fields, as if they were petal colours. The electric signals may also let the insects know if
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 21, 2013
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      Tests revealed that bees can distinguish between different floral fields, as if they were petal colours. The electric signals may also let the insects know if another bee has recently visited a flower.
      Read more at: http://bit.ly/WZtDBh
      Charles Walter

    • Terence Planke
       Hmmm!   Couldn t help but notice that all of the research mention pertained to   bumblebees yet earlier today, when the article was initially posted,   it
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 22, 2013
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         Hmmm!

          Couldn't help but notice that all of the research mention pertained to
          bumblebees yet earlier today, when the article was initially posted,
          it contained a picture of a frame of honey bees.

          It seems the newspaper grabbed the wrong "stock photo" to
          accompany the bumblebee-related research.   <g>

          Glad to see they corrected the problem.

          Now the question is does this research also apply to honey bees?

         

      • mdudley
        Seems about right. I notice that quite often when an article is on honeybees, they put up a picture of a hornet s nest. I would suspect that this would also
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 22, 2013
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          Seems about right. I notice that quite often when an article is on honeybees, they put up a picture of a hornet's nest.

          I would suspect that this would also apply to honeybees. I doubt a plant can tell what specifically pollinated it.

          Marshall

          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Terence Planke <plater122@...> wrote:
          >
          >  Hmmm!
          >
          >   Couldn't help but notice that all of the research mention pertained to
          >   bumblebees yet earlier today, when the article was initially posted,
          >   it contained a picture of a frame of honey bees.
          >
          >   It seems the newspaper grabbed the wrong "stock photo" to
          >   accompany the bumblebee-related research.   <g>
          >
          >   Glad to see they corrected the problem.
          >
          >   Now the question is does this research also apply to honey bees?
          >
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