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Starting with a nuc and hive beetles

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  • mdudley
    I stopped keeping bees over a decade ago due to the inability of the currenr breeds then to survive the varroa mites and hive beetles. A local apiary is now
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 19, 2013
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      I stopped keeping bees over a decade ago due to the inability of the currenr breeds then to survive the varroa mites and hive beetles.

      A local apiary is now providing survivor stock, which are hygienic and generally able to now deal with these pests without any chemicals. That along with the freeman beetle trap screened bottom board, I think I can hopefully get back in it without loosing all my hives any more.

      Previously I always started a hive with a package on foundation. I now have a hive with old fully drawn combs in which I plan to put a 3 frame nuc from this apiary in it around April 1.

      From my reading of the available information on dealing with hive beetles the most important thing is to not have more comb than the bees can cover, so they can keep it all patrolled.

      So I am not sure what I should do. If I put 3 frames in a 10 frame hive body with 7 frames of empty comb, there is no way they can cover these combs. Should I put in the nuc with only one comb on each side, then add the additional combs on the sides as the population swells where they can cover them. The guy at the apiary said this would create a disaster with them attempting to build comb outside the frames.

      Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

      Thanks,

      Marshall
    • Mike S
      ... From my reading of the available information on dealing with hive beetles the most important thing is to not have more comb than the bees can cover, so
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 19, 2013
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        >>>  
        From my reading of the available information on dealing with hive beetles the most important thing is to not have more comb than the bees can cover, so they can keep it all patrolled.

        If the comb is dry and without pollen stored in it, the beetles won't bother it.  They lay their eggs in comb that has pollen stored in it because that is what the larvae eat.

        I think putting a three comb nuc in a regular hive with dry, drawn comb would be okay.  Would involve less work for the nuc bees and they would only use what they could control.


        Mike in LA


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