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Re: [Beekeeping] A Beekeeping Question! Requeening a laying worker hive

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  • Tim Arheit
    Actually that s part of the problem with a laying worker, they haven t mated so they can only lay unfertilized eggs that will result in drones. Sometimes
    Message 1 of 19 , Feb 9, 2013
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      Actually that's part of the problem with a laying worker,  they haven't mated so they can only lay unfertilized eggs that will result in drones.   Sometimes they can lay very normal sized drone eggs,  but when you start seeing lots of eggs laid by works, you'll see many undersized eggs which isn't surprising since the workers reproduction organs aren't fully developed.

      -Tim

      On 2/9/2013 4:33 PM, karon wrote:
       

      You know, I’m not even entirely sure of that. No studies, basically, just an assumption. I would think she would have been out for a mating flight or an attempt at one. But, then again, it may be that a former forager may be a laying queen. Like I said, it has been a while since I kept bees and I only had a laying worker once.  I was just trying to think it through and assuming she had always been a layer but had not been fed jelly early enough to become a real queen. I suppose a former forager might change over to a laying queen.

       

      I may very well have been wrong about that. I am not certain why I came to that conclusion. Don’t know if I read it somewhere (and on further reflection, I doubt that I did) or just deduced it myself, incorrectly it seems, now that I have read more here and had time to think on it a little more.

       

      Karon Adams

      Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

      You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

      www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

      www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

       

      From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mike S
      Sent: Friday, February 08, 2013 9:54 PM
      To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [Beekeeping] A Beekeeping Question! Requeening a laying worker hive

       

       

      >>>    Unlike foragers, that laying worker has only been out of the hive one time.

      I'm not sure that I agree with the above statement.  I have heard of no study citing the above fact that a laying worker has only been out of the hive one time.  What is the source of this statement?  I'm not saying it's wrong.  I just question the validity.

      Mike in LA


    • karon
      And see, thinking through it, that does make more sense. Sorry, I was trying to think it through and I went the wrong way with it, I suppose. Karon Adams
      Message 2 of 19 , Feb 9, 2013
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        And see, thinking through it, that does make more sense. Sorry, I was trying to think it through and I went the wrong way with it, I suppose.

         

        Karon Adams

        Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

        You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

        www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

        www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

         

        From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim Arheit
        Sent: Saturday, February 09, 2013 5:33 PM
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] A Beekeeping Question! Requeening a laying worker hive

         

         

        Actually that's part of the problem with a laying worker,  they haven't mated so they can only lay unfertilized eggs that will result in drones.   Sometimes they can lay very normal sized drone eggs,  but when you start seeing lots of eggs laid by works, you'll see many undersized eggs which isn't surprising since the workers reproduction organs aren't fully developed.

        -Tim

        On 2/9/2013 4:33 PM, karon wrote:

         

        You know, I’m not even entirely sure of that. No studies, basically, just an assumption. I would think she would have been out for a mating flight or an attempt at one. But, then again, it may be that a former forager may be a laying queen. Like I said, it has been a while since I kept bees and I only had a laying worker once.  I was just trying to think it through and assuming she had always been a layer but had not been fed jelly early enough to become a real queen. I suppose a former forager might change over to a laying queen.

         

        I may very well have been wrong about that. I am not certain why I came to that conclusion. Don’t know if I read it somewhere (and on further reflection, I doubt that I did) or just deduced it myself, incorrectly it seems, now that I have read more here and had time to think on it a little more.

         

        Karon Adams

        Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

        You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

        www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

        www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

         

        From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mike S
        Sent: Friday, February 08, 2013 9:54 PM
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [Beekeeping] A Beekeeping Question! Requeening a laying worker hive

         

         

        >>>    Unlike foragers, that laying worker has only been out of the hive one time.

        I'm not sure that I agree with the above statement.  I have heard of no study citing the above fact that a laying worker has only been out of the hive one time.  What is the source of this statement?  I'm not saying it's wrong.  I just question the validity.

        Mike in LA

         

      • Bill
        TONS of activity inside and outside the hive today, one of our warmest days of the year. PaYing close attention for several minutes I witnessed a great deal of
        Message 3 of 19 , Feb 10, 2013
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          TONS of activity inside and outside the hive today, one of our warmest days of the year. PaYing close attention for several minutes I witnessed a great deal of bees returning with full pollen sacks. The spring bloom is starting early this year with stands of mustard in early blossom.

          I also noticed a variety of rosemary, which grows like a weed here and is used extensively for landscaping, was also in bloom and the thicket was thick with foraging honeybees.

          I think it's clear that with the activity I witnessed today that there's a queen inside that hive box and she is indeed "getting busy."

          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Mike S wrote:
          >
          > >>>    Unlike foragers, that laying worker has only been out of the hive one time.
          >
          > I'm not sure that I agree with the above statement.  I have heard of no study citing the above fact that a laying worker has only been out of the hive one time.  What is the source of this statement?  I'm not saying it's wrong.  I just question the validity.
          >
          > Mike in LA
          >
        • karon
          Yep, looks like you either missed the queen or she may be a late raised home grown queen and might be small. Looks like that will be enough to keep the hive
          Message 4 of 19 , Feb 11, 2013
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            Yep, looks like you either missed the queen or she may be a late raised home grown queen and might be small. Looks like that will be enough to keep the hive alive and that is a good thing. But, I would plan on requeening just to be on the safe side as soon as it is warm enough.

             

            Karon Adams

            Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

            You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

            www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

            www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com

             

            From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill
            Sent: Sunday, February 10, 2013 9:27 PM
            To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: A Beekeeping Question! Requeening a laying worker hive

             

             


            TONS of activity inside and outside the hive today, one of our warmest days of the year. PaYing close attention for several minutes I witnessed a great deal of bees returning with full pollen sacks. The spring bloom is starting early this year with stands of mustard in early blossom.

            I also noticed a variety of rosemary, which grows like a weed here and is used extensively for landscaping, was also in bloom and the thicket was thick with foraging honeybees.

            I think it's clear that with the activity I witnessed today that there's a queen inside that hive box and she is indeed "getting busy."

            --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Mike S wrote:
            >
            > >>>    Unlike foragers, that laying worker has only been out of the hive one time.
            >
            > I'm not sure that I agree with the above statement.  I have heard of no study citing the above fact that a laying worker has only been out of the hive one time.  What is the source of this statement?  I'm not saying it's wrong.  I just question the validity.
            >
            > Mike in LA
            >

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