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Re: Using the Dicot system

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  • mommyhen42
    Thank you for the detailed description. I think I can make that one work!
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 9, 2012
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      Thank you for the detailed description.
      I think I can make that one work!

      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:
      >
      > Good evening.  You asked:
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      > >>> 
      > what is the "punch" method?
      >
      >  
      >
      > The Cell Punch  Method is a means by which the larva is not handled directly
      > at all. The general classification of this method would be “cell punching.” In
      > this method the entire worker size cell with an egg or appropriate age larva is
      > removed by cutting or coring it out with a variety of tools. Two of the hazards
      > of grafting (mechanical damage and starvation) are eliminated. Since the whole
      > cell is removed, the larva is not touched directly in any way and it is removed
      > intact with its food supply uninterrupted. The cell is now mounted on the exact
      > type bar used for mounting artificial queen cell cups in the Doolittle Method.
      >
      > This “cell punch” method is the method
      > that I have used until recently. The selected queen is isolated on a frame of
      > drawn medium (or regular) brood wax foundation. After two to two and one-half
      > days this frame is used to cell punch eggs, thereby assuring that the youngest
      > possible age larvae will be used for queen-production. The younger the larvae
      > that are used, the more ovarioles, or egg-producing structures, the queen will
      > have and thus her vigor and productive life will be greater. This method is
      > still somewhat labor intensive, but it eliminated the hazards that I was
      > concerned about and so I was satisfied with the procedure and the results.<Jerry
      > Hayes>
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      >  
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      > The kit I got was produced by one of the
      > members of the Alabama Beekeepers Association.  It included a “punch” ring with a handle, some wooden bases
      > upon which to attach the “punched” cell, some wax which is used in melted form
      > to attach the punched cell to the wooden disk, and about six wooden disks to
      > use as the base for the queen cells that are built.
      >
      >  
      >
      > The actual cutting ring which is used to
      > cut out the desired cell is a very short piece of tubing with an inner diameter
      > about the size of a dime which has been sharpened on one side.  This is attached to a wire handle with
      > a wooden handle on the other end.  
      > The wooden disks were disks cut from an old broom handle.  Personally I would use a dowel rod with
      > a large enough diameter that it would allow the queen cell to be hung between
      > two brood frames and have the wood disk rest on the top bars of the two
      > adjoining frames. 
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      >  
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      > The cutting ring is heated by placing it
      > in a can of water which is heated by a heat source (a portable heat plate)
      > along with a small can of wax which would be used to attach the cut-out cells
      > onto the wooden disks.   The
      > frame which contains the cells you wish to punch should be a frame with wax
      > foundation, drawn out, and containing eggs or one day old brood.   Personally, I think I would
      > prefer the cells with one day old, or less, brood so there isn’t as much danger
      > of the transferred cell drying out during the transfer from the brood frame to
      > the queen cell frame.  The selected
      > cell is centered inside the cutting ring and then the hot ring is pressed all
      > the way through the drawn comb and the circular ring of comb is withdrawn from
      > the comb.  Gently handled, this cut
      > tube of comb is then attached to the wooden disk with a couple of drops of hot
      > wax..  This base is then attached
      > to the bar on the queen cell frame with more drops of hot wax.  This is done multiple times until you
      > have as many queen cells attached to the bars on the queen cell frame as you
      > desire.  All the time that you are
      > doing this, you keep a warm, moist towels covering over both the frame of brood
      > when not being manipulated and l over the queen cell frame.   This is done to keep the eggs or
      > young larvae in the transfer cells from drying out.  Upon completion of the placement of prospective queen cells
      > onto the queen cell frame, the frame is then placed in the queen cell starter
      > colony. 
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      >  
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      > That is the cell punch method of
      > obtaining initial queen cells.
      >
      >  
      >
      > MIKE in LA
      >
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      >
      > Source of the Jerry Hayes introduction is actually a
      > description of the Hopkins method of queen raising: 
      >
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