Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Bee flight range

Expand Messages
  • Ken
    Can anyone tell me what is the real flight rage for a bee looking for nectar? I have been told they will travel only 2 miles while others say up to 25 miles. I
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 11, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Can anyone tell me what is the real flight rage for a bee looking for
      nectar? I have been told they will travel only 2 miles while others
      say up to 25 miles. I am wanting to know so I can figure if my hives
      will be in range of some alfalfa fields.
    • Ron Culver
      It is very rare that bees will travel more than four to five miles, and those forced to do so don t last long in a location that requires such distances.
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 11, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        It is very rare that bees will travel more than four to five miles,
        and those forced to
        do so don't last long in a location that requires such distances. Their
        wings will tell
        the story. If you see lots of torn wings and reduced numbers of bees,
        they are traveling
        too far to forage. Typically you'll want your bees as close as possible
        to nectar
        sources. If you have a farmer nearby, ask him if he would benefit from
        the services
        of bees. Many will tell you they would, and invite their presence.

        Moving bees less than three miles away is a problem (many return to
        their prior
        location.) The solution most use - move them three to four miles, leave
        them there
        for three or four days - them move back to desired location.

        This common tactic tells you that most bees travel less than two to
        three miles. But,
        this presupposes that most kept bees aren't placed by the keeper in
        areas that are ill
        suited to them.


        Ken wrote:

        >Can anyone tell me what is the real flight rage for a bee looking for
        >nectar? I have been told they will travel only 2 miles while others
        >say up to 25 miles. I am wanting to know so I can figure if my hives
        >will be in range of some alfalfa fields.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Wayne Chesley
        Ron s post called to mind a question: I want to move my hives about 150 feet. Could I do a simple move that distance during the winter, when they are clustered
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 11, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Ron's post called to mind a question:

          I want to move my hives about 150 feet. Could I do a simple move
          that distance during the winter, when they are clustered and seldom
          out? Should I instead more them some time in the "warmer" weather
          the 3 miles or so and then move them back to the new site?

          Wayne Chesley
          Want Not Farm
          Brunswick, in the Dear Old State of Maine


          --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Ron Culver <ronc@e...> wrote:
          > Moving bees less than three miles away is a problem (many return
          to
          > their prior
          > location.) The solution most use - move them three to four miles,
          leave
          > them there
          > for three or four days - them move back to desired location.
          >
        • ROBERT J STOCKLEY
          I concur with Ron... The 25 miles probally came from distance Queens will fly to mate...Although I thought that was up to 20 miles. Ken
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 11, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            I concur with Ron... The 25 miles probally came from distance Queens will fly to mate...Although I thought that was up to 20 miles.

            Ken <kenwilso@...> wrote:
            Can anyone tell me what is the real flight rage for a bee looking for
            nectar? I have been told they will travel only 2 miles while others
            say up to 25 miles. I am wanting to know so I can figure if my hives
            will be in range of some alfalfa fields.


            ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
            Buy Ink Cartridges or Refill Kits for Your HP, Epson, Canon or Lexmark
            Printer at Myinks.com. Free s/h on orders $50 or more to the US & Canada. http://www.c1tracking.com/l.asp?cid=5511
            http://us.click.yahoo.com/l.m7sD/LIdGAA/qnsNAA/MwgrlB/TM
            ---------------------------------------------------------------------~->



            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


            Do you Yahoo!?
            Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software
          • Crenn
            To the person who wants to move them 150 feet: Move them at night when it s cold and then leave a nuc or something in the old spot to pick up stragglers.
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 11, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
               To the person who wants to move them 150 feet:
                Move them at night when it's cold and then leave a nuc or something in the old spot to pick up stragglers.
               
              Caitlin


              Do you Yahoo!?
              Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software
            • Mike
              ... From: Wayne Chesley Subject: [beekeeping] Moving hives (Re: Bee flight range) Ron s post called to mind a question: I want to move my hives about 150 feet.
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 12, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Subject: [beekeeping] Moving hives (Re: Bee flight range)

                Ron's post called to mind a question:

                I want to move my hives about 150 feet. Could I do a simple move
                that distance during the winter, when they are clustered and seldom
                out? Should I instead more them some time in the "warmer" weather
                the 3 miles or so and then move them back to the new site?

                Wayne Chesley
                Want Not Farm
                Brunswick, in the Dear Old State of Maine

                Wayne,
                     You can move your hives the three miles for a period of about a month and then move them back to your new local location, or you can move your hives about three feet at time with about five to seven days between moves to get them moved to your new location.  The three mile move is quicker and less labor intensive, but the three foot moves are cheaper on gas.   MIKE
                 
              • Wayne Chesley
                What I m really wondering is if it is possible to move hive less tnan three miles but more than three feet (like maybe 300 feet) during the winter, when the
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 14, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  What I'm really wondering is if it is possible to move hive less
                  tnan three miles but more than three feet (like maybe 300 feet)
                  during the winter, when the low temperature is keeping them hived
                  for long periods (weeks).


                  --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike" <mws@f...> wrote:
                  > You can move your hives the three miles for a period of
                  about a month and then move them back to your new local location, or
                  you can move your hives about three feet at time with about five to
                  seven days between moves to get them moved to your new location.
                  The three mile move is quicker and less labor intensive, but the
                  three foot moves are cheaper on gas. MIKE
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.