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Re: [Beekeeping] Bees Not Invited to Party

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  • dgcnc
    Steve, Unless the event is to be right at the beehive, I can’t imagine a problem. My bees don’t care about people unless the people are going into their
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 4, 2011
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      Steve,
       
      Unless the event is to be right at the beehive, I can’t imagine a problem. My bees don’t care about people unless the people are going into their hive. I can ride the lawnmower up against the hive with no ill effect. Honey bees don’t seem attracted to food like yellow jackets. So, what is your concern more specifically? Could it be that wife is just concerned that the bees exist? Think about the flyway. Is the event right in the path?
       
      From: Steve
      Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2011 11:32 AM
      Subject: [Beekeeping] Bees Not Invited to Party
       
       

      I have a healthy colony in 2 large supers located in my back yard in southern California. My wife is hosting an event this weekend and doesn't want any issues involving bees and guests. One option is to move them to my business about 10 miles away where I keep several other colonies, but I enjoy having the colony close to home where I can keep a close eye on it and give it a little more attention then the ones at work. I'm contemplating screening the entrance the night before the event and leaving it closed for 24 hours, but I'm not comfortable doing this without a little advice.

      I would appreciate any suggestions or comments.

      Thanks!

      Steve

    • Mike S
      I m contemplating screening the entrance the night before the event and leaving it closed for 24 hours, but I m not comfortable doing this without a little
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 4, 2011
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        I'm contemplating screening the entrance the night before the event and leaving it closed for 24 hours, but I'm not comfortable doing this without a little advice.

        If you decide to screen the entrance, you might consider using a screened bottom board and a screen for the inner cover with the outer cover set higher by blocks of wood between the rim of the super and the inside of the outer cover.  Doing this would provide a really good airflow through the hive and prevent overheating.  If you have empty drawn comb, you might also consider filling the empty cells with water and gentle inserting it in one of the outer positions of your hive.  This would give the bees an internal water source should they need one for cooling purposes.

        Mike in LA
      • Barbara Lindberg
        I agree with Steve. Bees aren t fond of human food and wouldn t show any interest but yellow jackets can show up for sure. If the party isn t in the flight
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 4, 2011
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          I agree with Steve.  Bees aren’t fond of human food and wouldn’t show any interest but yellow jackets can show up for sure.   If the party isn’t in the flight path from the hive the guests probably wouldn’t know they are there, especially if it’s a night.

           

          Barbara

          Ontario, Canada

           


          From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of dgcnc
          Sent: October 4, 2011 1:56 PM
          To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Bees Not Invited to Party

           

           

          Steve,

           

          Unless the event is to be right at the beehive, I can’t imagine a problem. My bees don’t care about people unless the people are going into their hive. I can ride the lawnmower up against the hive with no ill effect. Honey bees don’t seem attracted to food like yellow jackets. So, what is your concern more specifically? Could it be that wife is just concerned that the bees exist? Think about the flyway. Is the event right in the path?

        • Bill
          Gosh, if anything, the bees will only add to the success of the party. Not everyone has a hive in the backyard. My colony is always the conversation piece of
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 5, 2011
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            Gosh, if anything, the bees will only add to the success of the party. Not everyone has a hive in the backyard. My colony is always the conversation piece of every gathering. Everyone wants to get a look at the hive and the bees moving in and out of the supers. Some of them even want to get right in the flight path.

            The only problem I can see is that pollen sources are now starting to dry up. It's October. And when pollen sources start to dry up, colonies can and will get defensive. And defensive colonies will reach out and *kiss* (sting), from time to time.

            I noticed this activity with my first colony. It was a package of bees that I started with -- had to requeen in July -- and then got very defensive in September-October. The colony up and vanished on me later that winter.

            Two springs ago I received a gift of a wild swarm. A wild queen and three frames of brood. They've never stung me once. This spring? The hive split four times. I had a champion queen in those supers, and her offspring is/are doing just fine.

            I was just weeding in front of my hive the other day -- right at the mouth of it -- wearing a dark colored shirt no less. While I did get buzzed a few times -- the bees didn't seem the least bit concerned.

            I'm truly blessed with a docile, productive, strong colony. If that describes your colony, there's no reason why you can't host a party in your backyard.

            Bill
            Northern California

            --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <shart1955@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have a healthy colony in 2 large supers located in my back yard in southern California. My wife is hosting an event this weekend and doesn't want any issues involving bees and guests. One option is to move them to my business about 10 miles away where I keep several other colonies, but I enjoy having the colony close to home where I can keep a close eye on it and give it a little more attention then the ones at work. I'm contemplating screening the entrance the night before the event and leaving it closed for 24 hours, but I'm not comfortable doing this without a little advice.
            >
            > I would appreciate any suggestions or comments.
            >
            > Thanks!
            >
            > Steve
            >
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