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Question about bee cluster

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  • muchohobbies
    Hi All, A luster of bees arrived in my plum tree yesterday, and now it s gone. Never saw anything like it. Any explanation or comments would be appreciated.
    Message 1 of 20 , May 21, 2011
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      Hi All,

      A luster of bees arrived in my plum tree yesterday, and now it's gone. Never saw anything like it. Any explanation or comments would be appreciated.

      Here is a photo I took this morning.

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Beekeeping/photos/album/221657790/pic/list

      By the way, I live near San Jose, CA

      Phil
    • NCBootman
      That cluster was a swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home. If you
      Message 2 of 20 , May 22, 2011
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        That cluster was a swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home. If you are or want to be a bee keeper, this is a great way to get a new colony. All you would have needed to do is put that cluster in a hive and let them be and you are a beekeeper (smile). Slightly simplified, but true. Do you currently keep bees?
         
        NCBootMan
         
        Sent: Saturday, May 21, 2011 6:20 PM
        Subject: [Beekeeping] Question about bee cluster
         
         

        Hi All,

        A luster of bees arrived in my plum tree yesterday, and now it's gone. Never saw anything like it. Any explanation or comments would be appreciated.

        Here is a photo I took this morning.

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Beekeeping/photos/album/221657790/pic/list

        By the way, I live near San Jose, CA

        Phil

      • Philip Terzian
        NC,   Thanks for the explanation.  Don t currently keep bees.   Maybe one day I will give it a try.   Best, Phil   ... From: NCBootman
        Message 3 of 20 , May 22, 2011
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          NC,
           
          Thanks for the explanation.  Don't currently keep bees.   Maybe one day I will give it a try.
           
          Best,
          Phil
           
          --- On Sun, 5/22/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@...> wrote:

          From: NCBootman <ncbootman@...>
          Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Question about bee cluster
          To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, May 22, 2011, 9:46 AM

           
          That cluster was a swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home. If you are or want to be a bee keeper, this is a great way to get a new colony. All you would have needed to do is put that cluster in a hive and let them be and you are a beekeeper (smile). Slightly simplified, but true. Do you currently keep bees?
           
          NCBootMan
           
          Sent: Saturday, May 21, 2011 6:20 PM
          Subject: [Beekeeping] Question about bee cluster
           
           
          Hi All,

          A luster of bees arrived in my plum tree yesterday, and now it's gone. Never saw anything like it. Any explanation or comments would be appreciated.

          Here is a photo I took this morning.

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Beekeeping/photos/album/221657790/pic/list

          By the way, I live near San Jose, CA

          Phil

        • NCBootman
          Phil, You really should give it a try. And, just for your information, that swarm that left would have saved you from buying an approximately $85 package of
          Message 4 of 20 , May 22, 2011
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            Phil,
             
            You really should give it a try. And, just for your information, that swarm that left would have saved you from buying an approximately $85 package of bees and those bees are already accustomed to your area (grin).  And, your plum tree would thank you for the extra pollenation and the garden too not to mention that wonderful honey in the future. When you gonna get that first hive and protective gear? The veil is the most important and the rest will keep you feeling safe if you are skiddish.
             
            NCBootMan
             
            Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2011 12:55 PM
            Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Question about bee cluster
             
             

            NC,
             
            Thanks for the explanation.  Don't currently keep bees.   Maybe one day I will give it a try.
             
            Best,
            Phil
             
            --- On Sun, 5/22/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@...> wrote:

            From: NCBootman <ncbootman@...>
            Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Question about bee cluster
            To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, May 22, 2011, 9:46 AM

             
            That cluster was a swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home. If you are or want to be a bee keeper, this is a great way to get a new colony. All you would have needed to do is put that cluster in a hive and let them be and you are a beekeeper (smile). Slightly simplified, but true. Do you currently keep bees?
             
            NCBootMan
             
            Sent: Saturday, May 21, 2011 6:20 PM
            Subject: [Beekeeping] Question about bee cluster
             
             
            Hi All,

            A luster of bees arrived in my plum tree yesterday, and now it's gone. Never saw anything like it. Any explanation or comments would be appreciated.

            Here is a photo I took this morning.

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Beekeeping/photos/album/221657790/pic/list

            By the way, I live near San Jose, CA

            Phil

          • Bill
            That s not just a Swarm! That s a FATTY! That s just beautiful! By the way, everything NCBootman related is right on the money. My only addition is this: I
            Message 5 of 20 , May 23, 2011
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              That's not just a Swarm! That's a FATTY! That's just beautiful!

              By the way, everything NCBootman related is right on the money. My only addition is this:

              I prefer swarms over packaged bees -- and it's not just because one is free and the other is $85.

              A swarm is produced from a colony that has grown overcrowded and the worker bees -- in response to the crowded conditions -- have created new queen cells. When the new queen hatches -- the old queen leaves with a lot of brood.

              This is the sign of a STRONG hive. It means you've got multiple successions of queen bees who are good at producing tons of brood. In other words, you've got a champion queen. And if you have champion queen, chances are, you've got a strong colony inside that hive.

              I did the package route twice and lost both colonies. It wasn't until I was gifted with a wild swarm did my wife and I become champion beekeepers. My hive swarmed at least four times this spring (probably more), and it's still going strong. I've got a hive packed with honey and everything in our backyard BLOOMS like crazy.

              Nothing like a colony of bees to ensure a great harvest -- of EVERYTHING under the sun.

              Bill
              Sacramento, CA

              --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@...> wrote:
              >
              > That cluster was a swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home.
            • Philip Terzian
              Bill,   Thanks for all this information and comments.  I didn t realize what a gift this swarm was, or could have been if I were prepared for it.   Best,
              Message 6 of 20 , May 23, 2011
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                Bill,
                 
                Thanks for all this information and comments.  I didn't realize what a gift this swarm was, or could have been if I were prepared for it.
                 
                Best,
                Phil

                --- On Mon, 5/23/11, Bill <billbird2111@...> wrote:

                From: Bill <billbird2111@...>
                Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee cluster
                To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, May 23, 2011, 12:07 PM

                 
                That's not just a Swarm! That's a FATTY! That's just beautiful!

                By the way, everything NCBootman related is right on the money. My only addition is this:

                I prefer swarms over packaged bees -- and it's not just because one is free and the other is $85.

                A swarm is produced from a colony that has grown overcrowded and the worker bees -- in response to the crowded conditions -- have created new queen cells. When the new queen hatches -- the old queen leaves with a lot of brood.

                This is the sign of a STRONG hive. It means you've got multiple successions of queen bees who are good at producing tons of brood. In other words, you've got a champion queen. And if you have champion queen, chances are, you've got a strong colony inside that hive.

                I did the package route twice and lost both colonies. It wasn't until I was gifted with a wild swarm did my wife and I become champion beekeepers. My hive swarmed at least four times this spring (probably more), and it's still going strong. I've got a hive packed with honey and everything in our backyard BLOOMS like crazy.

                Nothing like a colony of bees to ensure a great harvest -- of EVERYTHING under the sun.

                Bill
                Sacramento, CA

                --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@...> wrote:
                >
                > That cluster was a swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home.

              • NCBootman
                Bill, I agree completely that a swarm is better than a package and one point I made was that the bees are acclimated to the area. I wanted a swarm for my first
                Message 7 of 20 , May 23, 2011
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                  Bill,
                   
                  I agree completely that a swarm is better than a package and one point I made was that the bees are acclimated to the area. I wanted a swarm for my first hive but also knew I really wanted bees this spring. Since I couldn’t get a swarm early on I opted to get the package but hope in the future to get the swarm. It is best.
                   
                  NCBootMan
                   
                  From: Bill
                  Sent: Monday, May 23, 2011 3:07 PM
                  Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee cluster
                   
                   

                  That's not just a Swarm! That's a FATTY! That's just beautiful!

                  By the way, everything NCBootman related is right on the money. My only addition is this:

                  I prefer swarms over packaged bees -- and it's not just because one is free and the other is $85.

                  A swarm is produced from a colony that has grown overcrowded and the worker bees -- in response to the crowded conditions -- have created new queen cells. When the new queen hatches -- the old queen leaves with a lot of brood.

                  This is the sign of a STRONG hive. It means you've got multiple successions of queen bees who are good at producing tons of brood. In other words, you've got a champion queen. And if you have champion queen, chances are, you've got a strong colony inside that hive.

                  I did the package route twice and lost both colonies. It wasn't until I was gifted with a wild swarm did my wife and I become champion beekeepers. My hive swarmed at least four times this spring (probably more), and it's still going strong. I've got a hive packed with honey and everything in our backyard BLOOMS like crazy.

                  Nothing like a colony of bees to ensure a great harvest -- of EVERYTHING under the sun.

                  Bill
                  Sacramento, CA

                  --- In mailto:Beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@...> wrote:

                  >
                  > That cluster was a
                  swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home.

                • NCBootman
                  Phil, Don’t feel bad about not collecting this swarm. Now that your interest has been peaked, get some equipment, find a bee group if you can, learn all you
                  Message 8 of 20 , May 23, 2011
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                    Phil,
                     
                    Don’t feel bad about not collecting this swarm. Now that your interest has been peaked, get some equipment, find a bee group if you can, learn all you can, and next time, when those bees come visiting, say thank you and put them in the hive (smile). Never look back at what might have been but instead forward at what will be! And, if you find a bee group, somebody will probably help you get a swarm again.
                     
                    NCBootMan
                     
                    Sent: Monday, May 23, 2011 3:13 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee cluster
                     
                     

                    Bill,
                     
                    Thanks for all this information and comments.  I didn't realize what a gift this swarm was, or could have been if I were prepared for it.
                     
                    Best,
                    Phil

                    --- On Mon, 5/23/11, Bill <billbird2111@...> wrote:

                    From: Bill <billbird2111@...>
                    Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee cluster
                    To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Monday, May 23, 2011, 12:07 PM

                     
                    That's not just a Swarm! That's a FATTY! That's just beautiful!

                    By the way, everything NCBootman related is right on the money. My only addition is this:

                    I prefer swarms over packaged bees -- and it's not just because one is free and the other is $85.

                    A swarm is produced from a colony that has grown overcrowded and the worker bees -- in response to the crowded conditions -- have created new queen cells. When the new queen hatches -- the old queen leaves with a lot of brood.

                    This is the sign of a STRONG hive. It means you've got multiple successions of queen bees who are good at producing tons of brood. In other words, you've got a champion queen. And if you have champion queen, chances are, you've got a strong colony inside that hive.

                    I did the package route twice and lost both colonies. It wasn't until I was gifted with a wild swarm did my wife and I become champion beekeepers. My hive swarmed at least four times this spring (probably more), and it's still going strong. I've got a hive packed with honey and everything in our backyard BLOOMS like crazy.

                    Nothing like a colony of bees to ensure a great harvest -- of EVERYTHING under the sun.

                    Bill
                    Sacramento, CA

                    --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > That cluster was a swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home.

                  • Barbara Lindberg
                    Here s a link to the Science Friday website where there are 10 short videos which are a step by step analysis of a swarm:
                    Message 9 of 20 , May 23, 2011
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                      Here’s a link to the Science Friday website where there are 10 short videos which are a step by step analysis of a swarm:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201012245

                       

                      As a beekeeper I found it amazing to watch as Dr. Thomas Seeley explains in detail the entire process of a swarm.  He even shows how we can tell to the exact second they’re going to leave.  Amazing!

                       

                      Barbara

                      Ontario, Canada

                      http://thebeejournal.blogspot.com

                    • Philip Terzian
                      Barbara,   This is fascinating.  Thanks for the link.   And a bonus....Dr. Tom Seeley is a professor at my Alma Mater.  :-)   Phil ... From: Barbara
                      Message 10 of 20 , May 23, 2011
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                        Barbara,
                         
                        This is fascinating.  Thanks for the link.
                         
                        And a bonus....Dr. Tom Seeley is a professor at my Alma Mater.  :-)
                         
                        Phil

                        --- On Mon, 5/23/11, Barbara Lindberg <barblindberg@...> wrote:

                        From: Barbara Lindberg <barblindberg@...>
                        Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee cluster - Swarm Analysis Videos
                        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Monday, May 23, 2011, 2:13 PM

                         

                        Here’s a link to the Science Friday website where there are 10 short videos which are a step by step analysis of a swarm:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201012245

                         

                        As a beekeeper I found it amazing to watch as Dr. Thomas Seeley explains in detail the entire process of a swarm.  He even shows how we can tell to the exact second they’re going to leave.  Amazing!

                         

                        Barbara

                        Ontario, Canada

                        http://thebeejournal.blogspot.com

                      • Laurelap Przybylski
                        Barbara, Thank you for the great link!! It IS a great way to learn! Laurel Oakland, CA ________________________________ From: Barbara Lindberg
                        Message 11 of 20 , May 23, 2011
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                          Barbara,

                          Thank you for the great link!! It IS a great way to learn!

                          Laurel
                          Oakland, CA


                          From: Barbara Lindberg <barblindberg@...>
                          To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Monday, May 23, 2011 2:13 PM
                          Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee cluster - Swarm Analysis Videos

                           
                          Here’s a link to the Science Friday website where there are 10 short videos which are a step by step analysis of a swarm:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201012245
                           
                          As a beekeeper I found it amazing to watch as Dr. Thomas Seeley explains in detail the entire process of a swarm.  He even shows how we can tell to the exact second they’re going to leave.  Amazing!
                           
                          Barbara
                          Ontario, Canada
                          http://thebeejournal.blogspot.com/


                        • MichaelK
                          The thing is that if you buy the equipment in the hopes that a swarm will come visiting you again, you are probably in for a let down. Spotting a swarm by
                          Message 12 of 20 , May 25, 2011
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                            The thing is that if you buy the equipment in the hopes that a swarm will come visiting you again, you are probably in for a let down. Spotting a swarm by random is rather rare nowadays. On the other hand there is usually an ag center for your area that folks WILL call when they have a swarm pop up in THEIR back yard. For some reason most folks don't appreciate the gals like we do and often get forwarded to the ag center for help in getting rid of them. If you buy some equipment, get on the swarm list for your area and have them call you when someone wants to get rid of a swarm. I've done this for the first time just recently and am hoping to replace my dead hives. I've been losing over half of my hives every year (I'm an amateur with 5 hives) and am really hoping a swarm would have a better constitution. I sure hope they give me a call for a swarm I can get to with a simple step ladder. It's been a harsh spring here in PA with no hope for swarms, but things are starting to get drier finally - so hopefully the hives will recover and start swarming (not YOUR hive, of course).

                            --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Philip Terzian <pterzian@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Bill,
                            >  
                            > Thanks for all this information and comments.  I didn't realize what a gift this swarm was, or could have been if I were prepared for it.
                            >  
                            > Best,
                            > Phil
                            >
                            > --- On Mon, 5/23/11, Bill <billbird2111@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > From: Bill <billbird2111@...>
                            > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee cluster
                            > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                            > Date: Monday, May 23, 2011, 12:07 PM
                            >
                            >
                            >  
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > That's not just a Swarm! That's a FATTY! That's just beautiful!
                            >
                            > By the way, everything NCBootman related is right on the money. My only addition is this:
                            >
                            > I prefer swarms over packaged bees -- and it's not just because one is free and the other is $85.
                            >
                            > A swarm is produced from a colony that has grown overcrowded and the worker bees -- in response to the crowded conditions -- have created new queen cells. When the new queen hatches -- the old queen leaves with a lot of brood.
                            >
                            > This is the sign of a STRONG hive. It means you've got multiple successions of queen bees who are good at producing tons of brood. In other words, you've got a champion queen. And if you have champion queen, chances are, you've got a strong colony inside that hive.
                            >
                            > I did the package route twice and lost both colonies. It wasn't until I was gifted with a wild swarm did my wife and I become champion beekeepers. My hive swarmed at least four times this spring (probably more), and it's still going strong. I've got a hive packed with honey and everything in our backyard BLOOMS like crazy.
                            >
                            > Nothing like a colony of bees to ensure a great harvest -- of EVERYTHING under the sun.
                            >
                            > Bill
                            > Sacramento, CA
                            >
                            > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > That cluster was a swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home.
                            >
                          • NCBootman
                            Two other possibilities for swarms are to call the local police department and exterminators. These are two places people often call when they have a swarm
                            Message 13 of 20 , May 25, 2011
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                              Two other possibilities for swarms are to call the local police department and exterminators. These are two places people often call when they have a swarm come visiting and many of them keep a swarm list or will tell you who they contact. A good exterminator realizes that keeping the bees alive and just relocating them benefits all. He/she gets the benefit of goodwill with the potential customer. If I call ABC about  this swarm of bees that’s scaring me to death and they sent this nice person to remove them and didn’t even charge, who will they call when they get overrun by some critter that needs the work of an exterminator? They’ll call that same place. This is one selling point if needed to network with your local potential swarm sources.
                               
                              NCBootMan
                               
                              From: MichaelK
                              Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 9:48 AM
                              Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee cluster
                               
                               

                              The thing is that if you buy the equipment in the hopes that a swarm will come visiting you again, you are probably in for a let down. Spotting a swarm by random is rather rare nowadays. On the other hand there is usually an ag center for your area that folks WILL call when they have a swarm pop up in THEIR back yard. For some reason most folks don't appreciate the gals like we do and often get forwarded to the ag center for help in getting rid of them. If you buy some equipment, get on the swarm list for your area and have them call you when someone wants to get rid of a swarm. I've done this for the first time just recently and am hoping to replace my dead hives. I've been losing over half of my hives every year (I'm an amateur with 5 hives) and am really hoping a swarm would have a better constitution. I sure hope they give me a call for a swarm I can get to with a simple step ladder. It's been a harsh spring here in PA with no hope for swarms, but things are starting to get drier finally - so hopefully the hives will recover and start swarming (not YOUR hive, of course).

                              --- In mailto:Beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com, Philip Terzian <pterzian@...> wrote:

                              >
                              > Bill,
                              > Â
                              > Thanks for all this information and comments.  I didn't realize
                              what a gift this swarm was, or could have been if I were prepared for it.
                              > Â
                              > Best,
                              > Phil
                              >
                              > --- On Mon, 5/23/11,
                              Bill <billbird2111@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > From: Bill
                              <billbird2111@...>
                              > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee
                              cluster
                              > To:
                              href="mailto:Beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com">mailto:Beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com
                              >
                              Date: Monday, May 23, 2011, 12:07 PM
                              >
                              >
                              >  
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > That's not just a Swarm! That's a FATTY! That's just
                              beautiful!
                              >
                              > By the way, everything NCBootman related is right on
                              the money. My only addition is this:
                              >
                              > I prefer swarms over
                              packaged bees -- and it's not just because one is free and the other is $85.
                              >
                              > A swarm is produced from a colony that has grown
                              overcrowded and the worker bees -- in response to the crowded conditions -- have created new queen cells. When the new queen hatches -- the old queen leaves with a lot of brood.
                              >
                              > This is the sign of a STRONG hive. It means
                              you've got multiple successions of queen bees who are good at producing tons of brood. In other words, you've got a champion queen. And if you have champion queen, chances are, you've got a strong colony inside that hive.
                              >
                              > I did the package route twice and lost both colonies. It wasn't until I
                              was gifted with a wild swarm did my wife and I become champion beekeepers. My hive swarmed at least four times this spring (probably more), and it's still going strong. I've got a hive packed with honey and everything in our backyard BLOOMS like crazy.
                              >
                              > Nothing like a colony of bees to ensure a
                              great harvest -- of EVERYTHING under the sun.
                              >
                              > Bill
                              >
                              Sacramento, CA
                              >
                              > --- In
                              href="mailto:Beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com">mailto:Beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > That cluster was
                              a swarm. They hovered in your plum tree while the scouts went and found a place to live. Now, the bees have all gone to their new home.
                              >

                            • Mike S
                              I sure hope they give me a call for a swarm I can get to with a simple step ladder Get a five gallon bucket with lid, very stiff 1 1/2 PVC pipe or galvanized
                              Message 14 of 20 , May 25, 2011
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                                I sure hope they give me a call for a swarm I can get to with a simple step ladder

                                Get a five gallon bucket with lid, very stiff 1 1/2" PVC pipe or galvanized pipe (Be careful of electrical lines), a flange to fit on the end of the pipe, and a length of rope that's about five feet longer than the length of your pipe. 

                                Drill a hole in the bottom of the five gallon bucket, attach the pipe flange to the bottom outside of the bucket, and then run your rope up through the pipe into the pipe, through the flange on the bottom of the bucket, and out of the top of the bucket.  Drill a hole in the lid of the bucket large enough for the rope to run through (no larger) and run the end of the rope through that hole.  Tie the end of the rope off.

                                When you attach the pipe to the bucket, the bucket will reach as high as the pipe is long plus your reach.  When you pull on the rope, it will pull the lid of the bucket over the top of the bucket sealing it temporarily.   When you get a swarm up high, but within reach of the bucket extension, put the bucket underneath the swarm, smack the bucket up under the swarm hopefully knocking most of the swarm off and into the bucket.  Immediately pull the rope to bring the lid up and over the lip of the bucket sealing the bees inside the bucket.   Keeping the lid tight against the bucket, bring it down and empty it into a waiting empty hive fixed up to receive the bees.  Then do as you think best.

                                Mike in LA

                              • NCBootman
                                Mike, That’s an ingenious swarm catcher. Gotta gather supplies and make one of those. You made a good point about get as many bees as you can. I have read
                                Message 15 of 20 , May 25, 2011
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                                  Mike,
                                   
                                  That’s an ingenious swarm catcher. Gotta gather supplies and make one of those.
                                   
                                  You made a good point about get as many bees as you can. I have read that if for some reason bees seem scattered, putting the biggest part in the hive works and if you can leave it there till dark, the rest will have gone in too since they want to stay together. But, even not getting all the bees is better than not getting any.
                                   
                                  Thanks again for the catcher idea.
                                   
                                  NCBootMan
                                   
                                  From: Mike S
                                  Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 10:25 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Swarm Retrieval without a Ladder
                                   
                                   

                                  I sure hope they give me a call for a swarm I can get to with a simple step ladder

                                  Get a five gallon bucket with lid, very stiff 1 1/2" PVC pipe or galvanized pipe (Be careful of electrical lines), a flange to fit on the end of the pipe, and a length of rope that's about five feet longer than the length of your pipe. 

                                  Drill a hole in the bottom of the five gallon bucket, attach the pipe flange to the bottom outside of the bucket, and then run your rope up through the pipe into the pipe, through the flange on the bottom of the bucket, and out of the top of the bucket.  Drill a hole in the lid of the bucket large enough for the rope to run through (no larger) and run the end of the rope through that hole.  Tie the end of the rope off.

                                  When you attach the pipe to the bucket, the bucket will reach as high as the pipe is long plus your reach.  When you pull on the rope, it will pull the lid of the bucket over the top of the bucket sealing it temporarily.   When you get a swarm up high, but within reach of the bucket extension, put the bucket underneath the swarm, smack the bucket up under the swarm hopefully knocking most of the swarm off and into the bucket.  Immediately pull the rope to bring the lid up and over the lip of the bucket sealing the bees inside the bucket.   Keeping the lid tight against the bucket, bring it down and empty it into a waiting empty hive fixed up to receive the bees.  Then do as you think best.

                                  Mike in LA

                                • Barbara Lindberg
                                  I suggest putting your name in with your local municipality as someone who will retrieve swarms. A beekeeping friend in my area can t keep up with removing
                                  Message 16 of 20 , May 25, 2011
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                                    I suggest putting your name in with your local municipality as someone who will retrieve swarms.  A beekeeping friend in my area can’t keep up with removing bees from trees on city property.

                                     

                                    Barbara

                                    Ontario, Canada

                                     


                                    From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of NCBootman
                                    Sent: May 25, 2011 10:00 AM
                                    To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: Question about bee cluster

                                     

                                     

                                    Two other possibilities for swarms are to call the local police department and exterminators. These are two places people often call when they have a swarm come visiting and many of them keep a swarm list or will tell you who they contact. A good exterminator realizes that keeping the bees alive and just relocating them benefits all. He/she gets the benefit of goodwill with the potential customer. If I call ABC about  this swarm of bees that’s scaring me to death and they sent this nice person to remove them and didn’t even charge, who will they call when they get overrun by some critter that needs the work of an exterminator? They’ll call that same place. This is one selling point if needed to network with your local potential swarm sources.

                                     

                                    NCBootMan

                                  • Bill
                                    One other thing I would add to Mike s observations -- since he lives in Southern California? Make DANG sure the swarm isn t Africanized -- otherwise you ll be
                                    Message 17 of 20 , May 26, 2011
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                                      One other thing I would add to Mike's observations -- since he lives in Southern California?

                                      Make DANG sure the swarm isn't Africanized -- otherwise you'll be treated to a short Dr. Suess story called "Run, Mike, Run. Watch Mike Run."

                                      I am so glad the progression of this strain stopped somewhere near Kern County. They just cannot survive the cold winters this far north.

                                      That's fine with me. I like my gentle Italians.

                                      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Mike,
                                      >
                                      > That’s an ingenious swarm catcher. Gotta gather supplies and make one of those.
                                      >
                                      > You made a good point about get as many bees as you can. I have read that if for some reason bees seem scattered, putting the biggest part in the hive works and if you can leave it there till dark, the rest will have gone in too since they want to stay together. But, even not getting all the bees is better than not getting any.
                                      >
                                      > Thanks again for the catcher idea.
                                      >
                                      > NCBootMan
                                      >
                                      > From: Mike S
                                      > Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 10:25 AM
                                      > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                                      > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Swarm Retrieval without a Ladder
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > I sure hope they give me a call for a swarm I can get to with a simple step ladder
                                      >
                                      > Get a five gallon bucket with lid, very stiff 1 1/2" PVC pipe or galvanized pipe (Be careful of electrical lines), a flange to fit on the end of the pipe, and a length of rope that's about five feet longer than the length of your pipe.
                                      >
                                      > Drill a hole in the bottom of the five gallon bucket, attach the pipe flange to the bottom outside of the bucket, and then run your rope up through the pipe into the pipe, through the flange on the bottom of the bucket, and out of the top of the bucket. Drill a hole in the lid of the bucket large enough for the rope to run through (no larger) and run the end of the rope through that hole. Tie the end of the rope off.
                                      >
                                      > When you attach the pipe to the bucket, the bucket will reach as high as the pipe is long plus your reach. When you pull on the rope, it will pull the lid of the bucket over the top of the bucket sealing it temporarily. When you get a swarm up high, but within reach of the bucket extension, put the bucket underneath the swarm, smack the bucket up under the swarm hopefully knocking most of the swarm off and into the bucket. Immediately pull the rope to bring the lid up and over the lip of the bucket sealing the bees inside the bucket. Keeping the lid tight against the bucket, bring it down and empty it into a waiting empty hive fixed up to receive the bees. Then do as you think best.
                                      >
                                      > Mike in LA
                                      >
                                    • Mike S
                                      ...  add to Mike s observations -- since he lives in Southern California? I m in one of the other LAs  -  Lower Alabama.   Mike in LA ... add to Mike s
                                      Message 18 of 20 , May 26, 2011
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                                        ...  add to Mike's observations -- since he lives in Southern California?

                                        I'm in one of the other LAs  -  Lower Alabama.  

                                        Mike in LA

                                      • baldbeeman
                                        I was lazy so I bought mine from http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Hipps-Swarm-Retriever/productinfo/270/ . The thing has paid for itself dozens of times
                                        Message 19 of 20 , May 27, 2011
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                                          I was lazy so I bought mine from
                                          http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Hipps-Swarm-Retriever/productinfo/270/ .
                                          The thing has paid for itself dozens of times over. I've caught swarms which others have looked up at 20 or so feet off the ground and said "No Way!" Many times its been very handy to work with a partner with a similar length pole saw/clipper of similar length. Lots of times we've been able to snip off a branch end with a swarm on it, drop it whole into the bucket, secure the lid before bringing it down. Otherwise by myself it's the bump and go with just the bucket retriever. Easy and fun.

                                          baldbeeman, Aurora CO

                                          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I sure hope they give me a call for a swarm I can get to with a simple step ladder
                                          >
                                          > Get a five gallon bucket with lid, very stiff 1 1/2" PVC pipe or galvanized pipe (Be careful of electrical lines), a flange to fit on the end of the pipe, and a length of rope that's about five feet longer than the length of your pipe. 
                                          >
                                          > Drill a hole in the bottom of the five gallon bucket, attach the pipe flange to the bottom outside of the bucket, and then run your rope up through the pipe into the pipe, through the flange on the bottom of the bucket, and out of the top of the bucket.  Drill a hole in the lid of the bucket large enough for the rope to run through (no larger) and run the end of the rope through that hole.  Tie the end of the rope off.
                                          >
                                          > When you attach the pipe to the bucket, the bucket will reach as high as the pipe is long plus your reach.  When you pull on the rope, it will pull the lid of the bucket over the top of the bucket sealing it temporarily.   When you get a swarm up high, but within reach of the bucket extension, put the bucket underneath the swarm, smack the bucket up under the swarm hopefully knocking most of the swarm off and into the bucket.  Immediately pull the rope to bring the lid up and over the lip of the bucket sealing the bees inside the bucket.   Keeping the lid tight against the bucket, bring it down and empty it into a waiting empty hive fixed up to receive the bees.  Then do as you think best.
                                          >
                                          > Mike in LA
                                          >
                                        • Breckenridge
                                          A little FYI on the AHB. I live on the Kern/Sanbernardino county line and have recovered two (2) AHB swarms in the past 4 years. The second of which I had
                                          Message 20 of 20 , May 27, 2011
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                                            A little FYI on the AHB. I live on the Kern/Sanbernardino county line and have recovered two (2) AHB swarms in the past 4 years. The second of which I had Dept Ag come out and get some carcass samples to confirm what I think I know. As long as you are prepared for them when you get there it is not so bad. Not something for the queezy that's for sure.s

                                            --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <billbird2111@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > One other thing I would add to Mike's observations -- since he lives in Southern California?
                                            >
                                            > Make DANG sure the swarm isn't Africanized -- otherwise you'll be treated to a short Dr. Suess story called "Run, Mike, Run. Watch Mike Run."
                                            >
                                            > I am so glad the progression of this strain stopped somewhere near Kern County. They just cannot survive the cold winters this far north.
                                            >
                                            > That's fine with me. I like my gentle Italians.
                                            >
                                            > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > Mike,
                                            > >
                                            > > That’s an ingenious swarm catcher. Gotta gather supplies and make one of those.
                                            > >
                                            > > You made a good point about get as many bees as you can. I have read that if for some reason bees seem scattered, putting the biggest part in the hive works and if you can leave it there till dark, the rest will have gone in too since they want to stay together. But, even not getting all the bees is better than not getting any.
                                            > >
                                            > > Thanks again for the catcher idea.
                                            > >
                                            > > NCBootMan
                                            > >
                                            > > From: Mike S
                                            > > Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 10:25 AM
                                            > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                                            > > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Swarm Retrieval without a Ladder
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > I sure hope they give me a call for a swarm I can get to with a simple step ladder
                                            > >
                                            > > Get a five gallon bucket with lid, very stiff 1 1/2" PVC pipe or galvanized pipe (Be careful of electrical lines), a flange to fit on the end of the pipe, and a length of rope that's about five feet longer than the length of your pipe.
                                            > >
                                            > > Drill a hole in the bottom of the five gallon bucket, attach the pipe flange to the bottom outside of the bucket, and then run your rope up through the pipe into the pipe, through the flange on the bottom of the bucket, and out of the top of the bucket. Drill a hole in the lid of the bucket large enough for the rope to run through (no larger) and run the end of the rope through that hole. Tie the end of the rope off.
                                            > >
                                            > > When you attach the pipe to the bucket, the bucket will reach as high as the pipe is long plus your reach. When you pull on the rope, it will pull the lid of the bucket over the top of the bucket sealing it temporarily. When you get a swarm up high, but within reach of the bucket extension, put the bucket underneath the swarm, smack the bucket up under the swarm hopefully knocking most of the swarm off and into the bucket. Immediately pull the rope to bring the lid up and over the lip of the bucket sealing the bees inside the bucket. Keeping the lid tight against the bucket, bring it down and empty it into a waiting empty hive fixed up to receive the bees. Then do as you think best.
                                            > >
                                            > > Mike in LA
                                            > >
                                            >
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