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Re: [Beekeeping] Varroa mites

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  • ken@mrksbees.net
    From: Ken Woodard ---- Mr. K s BEES --- 804-745-6360 To: Quoting nsl2317 : I have selected for mite resistance in my Carniolan SURVIVOR
    Message 1 of 37 , Feb 12, 2011
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      From:
      Ken Woodard ---- Mr. K's BEES --- 804-745-6360

      To:





      Quoting nsl2317 <ny2317@...>:
      I have selected for mite resistance in my Carniolan "SURVIVOR"
      stock. The last time I treat for varroa was 2003 . I maintain selected
      drone colonies at a distance of about .6 to 5.0 miles around my mating
      yards.

      I do not TREAT my bees with any "Chemical remedies"; they are not
      sick and are not in need of treatment. I have started using Honeybee
      Healthy, it seems to boost them.

      I let the bees take care of themselves -- mother natures paradigm --It works-
      Look for "LOCAL BEE STOCK" in your area especially if they can verify
      "survivors" without harsh chemicals -- Pool resources in your area and
      start a "CO-OP" for resistant bees!!

      A good many of the package producers may treat their colonies 3 or 4
      times per year to kill varroa -- that is not sustainable beekeeping --
      just sustainable package business. I hope all will change their ways.
      There are far too many chemicals brought into our colonies by foragers
      - the last thing, as honeybee stewards is to dump more in on them
      intentionally. Myth -- "IT IS CHEAP and EFFECTIVE and ""APPROVED".
      Anything worthwhile --- takes time and intelligence, get you head OUT
      Of THAT BOX (sand) -- THINK!!!

      "Can't stay in business without the treatments"? I say you don't need
      to BEE in the business. HELP SAVE the HONEYBEES!!

      Good luck to all for 2011!!!
      >
      >
      > Hi Everyone,
      >
      > I was reading a great article on sick bees in the current American
      > Bee Journal by Randy Oliver. In his article, he writes about
      > infections by multiple viruses to the bees via Varroa mites. I am a
      > backyard beekeeper with 3 hives and get stung on the average of 20
      > to 50 times per year. After reading this article, I am concerned
      > with the possibility of these viruses being transmitted to the
      > beekeeper by bee sting just like the West Nile virus. I use Apiguard
      > (essential oil Thymol products) twice a year for mite control.
      > Based on your experience, what is the most effective way of
      > controlling the mites?
      > Nasser
      >
      >
      >
    • Alan Fox
      I ve been putting fondant in plastic bags placed straight on top of the brood frames or on the qx and making sure it covers most of the hive. Slash the plastic
      Message 37 of 37 , Feb 22, 2011
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        I've been putting fondant in plastic bags placed straight on top of the brood frames or on the qx and making sure it covers most of the hive. Slash the plastic bag underneath a few times to let the bees in , This seems to have helped my bees as they haven't moved much put have come up for the fondant. I've rolled it flat with a rolling pin  to about 1/2 inch to an inch thickness Alan


        From: roger g <toad08551@...>
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, 22 February, 2011 18:00:53
        Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: New Beekeeper (continued) making equip --no chemicals

         

        Not sure of their conditions but the last one i lost was a REAL good hive last yr. came though winter strong ,built up nice. I checked in sping and found some queen cells. so took queen and some brood put in another hive (forced swarm), checked lil later and there was 15 queen cells in there So i took couple frames with queen cells and put it nukes. Let original hive re-queen self.
        They built up again real strong even had 3 honey supers on at one time. in the fall i took one super of honey off, left 2 parcially filled honey supers on for food. Lower deeps looked good, thought it was good for the winter. Checked last week and they were dead???? Long cold spell, they cleaned out the 2 lower deeps and there was still honey in top 2 supers. There was a large clust of dead bees in bottom deep. Apparently there ate all stores in lower hive and didn't break cluster to go up to honey in top roger NJ
        PS 3 of the hives i started from them are still fine

        --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Alan Fox <alan_foxy2000@...> wrote:
        > Hi All
        i think it would be helpful to everyone when talking about  things if
        > we all put a  country and location and winter temperatures when talking about
        > treatments and losses . Just a thought ,
          ROGER


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