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bee feeding?

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  • rzep
    My bees seem indifferent to the sugar water provided. A liter bottle will go several weeks unconsummed. By visual inspection the bees seem(?) healthy. Could it
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 23, 2011
      My bees seem indifferent to the sugar water provided. A liter bottle will go several weeks unconsummed. By visual inspection the bees seem(?) healthy. Could it be that they prefer there own honey instead? Is the cold a factor? Near record cold in Central Georgia earlier, but now more seasonal. Ideas?
    • peter haywood
      Too cold!  The very best thing would be an invert fondant such as Apivert or Ambrosia, placed on a queen excluder on the brood frame top bars as close to
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 23, 2011
        Too cold!  The very best thing would be an invert fondant such as Apivert or Ambrosia, placed on a queen excluder on the brood frame top bars as close to the bees as possible.  I have in the past used invert syrup (Ambrosia) in a small contact feeder in mid-winter for nucs with very good results but I would definintely not recommend sugar syrup.  I guess most people use bakers fondant or candy but the bees have to invert that themselves, which is more work.  It all depends how big and how light (hungry) they are.  If they still have plenty of stores and they`re a strong stock then candy or fondant will do fine.
        Pete H

        From: rzep <wrzep@...>
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, 23 January, 2011 13:55:09
        Subject: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?

         

        My bees seem indifferent to the sugar water provided. A liter bottle will go several weeks unconsummed. By visual inspection the bees seem(?) healthy. Could it be that they prefer there own honey instead? Is the cold a factor? Near record cold in Central Georgia earlier, but now more seasonal. Ideas?


      • NCBootman
        If your bees have sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water? Honey is better for bees than sugar water because it has nutrients and things they
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 23, 2011
          If your bees have sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water? Honey is better for bees than sugar water because it has nutrients and things they need that sugar water doesn’t have. Sugar water is a supplement if for some reason the bees are running low on honey.
          And, even then, some people have fed them other honey to get them through.
          Greg in NC
           
          From: rzep
          Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 8:55 AM
          Subject: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?
           
           

          My bees seem indifferent to the sugar water provided. A liter bottle will go several weeks unconsummed. By visual inspection the bees seem(?) healthy. Could it be that they prefer there own honey instead? Is the cold a factor? Near record cold in Central Georgia earlier, but now more seasonal. Ideas?

        • Alan Fox
          Most beekeepers that I know here in England feed fondant when it s cold  and syrup prior to the spring build up as it s being to warm up . Feeding syrup in
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 23, 2011
            Most beekeepers that I know here in England feed fondant when it's cold  and syrup prior to the spring build up as it's being to warm up . Feeding syrup in the cold weather when the bees can't get out on cleansing flights can lead to nosema

            From: rzep <wrzep@...>
            To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sun, 23 January, 2011 13:55:09
            Subject: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?

             

            My bees seem indifferent to the sugar water provided. A liter bottle will go several weeks unconsummed. By visual inspection the bees seem(?) healthy. Could it be that they prefer there own honey instead? Is the cold a factor? Near record cold in Central Georgia earlier, but now more seasonal. Ideas?


          • Mike S
            ... Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage early spring buildup.   That is especially useful for some areas of the
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 23, 2011
              --- On Sun, 1/23/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@...> wrote:If your bees have sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water?


              Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage early spring buildup.   That is especially useful for some areas of the country such as mine (southwest Albama).  The nectar flow starts early here and getting the hive population built up early helps to produce a larger honey crop than if the bees were left to build up naturally a couple of weeks later.  The syrup feeding will cease once the regular early spring nectar flows start and the syrup can be taken off.   However, care must be taken that the bees have enough resources to ensure continued health and growth if the early spring flow should suddenly cease.  A number of colony deaths can be attributed to starvation after the spring buildup begins.

              Mike in LA

            • NCBootman
              Thanks for the great reply. I learned something. NCBootMan From: Mike S Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 10:10 PM To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re:
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 23, 2011
                Thanks for the great reply. I learned something.
                 
                NCBootMan
                 
                From: Mike S
                Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 10:10 PM
                Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?
                 
                 

                --- On Sun, 1/23/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@...> wrote:If your bees have sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water?


                Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage early spring buildup.   That is especially useful for some areas of the country such as mine (southwest Albama).  The nectar flow starts early here and getting the hive population built up early helps to produce a larger honey crop than if the bees were left to build up naturally a couple of weeks later.  The syrup feeding will cease once the regular early spring nectar flows start and the syrup can be taken off.   However, care must be taken that the bees have enough resources to ensure continued health and growth if the early spring flow should suddenly cease.  A number of colony deaths can be attributed to starvation after the spring buildup begins.

                Mike in LA

              • Kamil
                Hi, During the nectar flow, we have some dry sugar in the hives here in Norway. This is meant to be backup if the nectar flow stops. Bees do not eat the dry
                Message 7 of 14 , Jan 28, 2011
                  Hi,
                  During the nectar flow, we have some dry sugar in the hives here in Norway. This is meant to be backup if the nectar flow stops. Bees do not eat the dry sugar unless they have to. Neither can they make honey from it. This way we avoid starvation and false honey. It is allowed to feed the bees organic sugar for us who are approved as organic beekeepers.
                  Kamil

                  --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks for the great reply. I learned something.
                  >
                  > NCBootMan
                  >
                  > From: Mike S
                  > Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 10:10 PM
                  > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?
                  >
                  >
                  > --- On Sun, 1/23/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@...> wrote:If your bees have sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water?
                  >
                  >
                  > Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage early spring buildup. That is especially useful for some areas of the country such as mine (southwest Albama). The nectar flow starts early here and getting the hive population built up early helps to produce a larger honey crop than if the bees were left to build up naturally a couple of weeks later. The syrup feeding will cease once the regular early spring nectar flows start and the syrup can be taken off. However, care must be taken that the bees have enough resources to ensure continued health and growth if the early spring flow should suddenly cease. A number of colony deaths can be attributed to starvation after the spring buildup begins.
                  >
                  > Mike in LA
                  >
                • Alan Fox
                  Kamil          I read Millers book and about him putting dry sugar in the hive then pouring water over it. Do you put it on top of the crown board
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jan 28, 2011
                    Kamil
                             I read Millers book and about him putting dry sugar in the hive then pouring water over it. Do you put it on top of the crown board above a honey super. How do you winter your hives , I think it might be a bit colder where you are , than England. Alan


                    From: Kamil <kamildursun@...>
                    To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 14:09:32
                    Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?

                     

                    Hi,
                    During the nectar flow, we have some dry sugar in the hives here in Norway. This is meant to be backup if the nectar flow stops. Bees do not eat the dry sugar unless they have to. Neither can they make honey from it. This way we avoid starvation and false honey. It is allowed to feed the bees organic sugar for us who are approved as organic beekeepers.
                    Kamil

                    --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks for the great reply. I learned something.
                    >
                    > NCBootMan
                    >
                    > From: Mike S
                    > Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 10:10 PM
                    > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?
                    >
                    >
                    > --- On Sun, 1/23/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@...> wrote:If your bees have sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water?
                    >
                    >
                    > Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage early spring buildup. That is especially useful for some areas of the country such as mine (southwest Albama). The nectar flow starts early here and getting the hive population built up early helps to produce a larger honey crop than if the bees were left to build up naturally a couple of weeks later. The syrup feeding will cease once the regular early spring nectar flows start and the syrup can be taken off. However, care must be taken that the bees have enough resources to ensure continued health and growth if the early spring flow should suddenly cease. A number of colony deaths can be attributed to starvation after the spring buildup begins.
                    >
                    > Mike in LA
                    >


                  • Kamil
                    Hi Alan, I have the dry sugar on the crown board at the top of the super. I do not pour water on it. Sometimes the sugar gets hard because of the humidity in
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jan 28, 2011
                      Hi Alan,
                      I have the dry sugar on the crown board at the top of the super. I do not pour water on it. Sometimes the sugar gets hard because of the humidity in the hive. In this case I replace the sugar.
                      I live at southern Norway but it can be cold here. Especially this year it has been very cold before Christmas. I do not do anything special for wintering. The hive-walls are insulated. I reduce the number of frames to 7-8 and fill the rest of the hive with jackopor insulation. I do not know the English brand name for it, it is pink and hard foam. The bees do not eat it as they might with isopor.
                      There is a mesh at the bottom of the hives. This remains open during the winter. It is said that the cold temperature is not a problem but humidity is. I have experienced that it is correct. I record the sound of the bees from time to time with my telephone and they are all alive for the time being.
                      Kamil

                      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Alan Fox <alan_foxy2000@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Kamil
                      >          I read Millers book and about him putting dry sugar in the hive then
                      > pouring water over it. Do you put it on top of the crown board above a honey
                      > super. How do you winter your hives , I think it might be a bit colder where you
                      > are , than England. Alan
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: Kamil <kamildursun@...>
                      > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 14:09:32
                      > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?
                      >
                      >  
                      > Hi,
                      > During the nectar flow, we have some dry sugar in the hives here in Norway. This
                      > is meant to be backup if the nectar flow stops. Bees do not eat the dry sugar
                      > unless they have to. Neither can they make honey from it. This way we avoid
                      > starvation and false honey. It is allowed to feed the bees organic sugar for us
                      > who are approved as organic beekeepers.
                      > Kamil
                      >
                      > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Thanks for the great reply. I learned something.
                      > >
                      > > NCBootMan
                      > >
                      > > From: Mike S
                      > > Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 10:10 PM
                      > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- On Sun, 1/23/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@> wrote:If your bees have
                      > >sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water?
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage
                      > >early spring buildup. That is especially useful for some areas of the country
                      > >such as mine (southwest Albama). The nectar flow starts early here and getting
                      > >the hive population built up early helps to produce a larger honey crop than if
                      > >the bees were left to build up naturally a couple of weeks later. The syrup
                      > >feeding will cease once the regular early spring nectar flows start and the
                      > >syrup can be taken off. However, care must be taken that the bees have enough
                      > >resources to ensure continued health and growth if the early spring flow should
                      > >suddenly cease. A number of colony deaths can be attributed to starvation after
                      > >the spring buildup begins.
                      > >
                      > > Mike in LA
                      > >
                      >
                    • Alan Fox
                      Hi Kamil               What type of hive do you use  and what is the thickness of the insulation on the side walls of the hives. The beekeepers
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jan 28, 2011
                        Hi Kamil
                                      What type of hive do you use  and what is the thickness of the insulation on the side walls of the hives. The beekeepers that I've spoken to about insulation mainly use polystyrene wrapped in tin foil.
                                 Even with insulation on the walls of the hive you'd have thought that the temperature would drop really low with open mesh floors that are left open to the elements. What is a usual night temperature in winter over there.
                                Do you have a problem with varroa.
                                What is your average honey crop for a season. Alan


                        From: Kamil <kamildursun@...>
                        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 15:18:56
                        Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?

                         

                        Hi Alan,
                        I have the dry sugar on the crown board at the top of the super. I do not pour water on it. Sometimes the sugar gets hard because of the humidity in the hive. In this case I replace the sugar.
                        I live at southern Norway but it can be cold here. Especially this year it has been very cold before Christmas. I do not do anything special for wintering. The hive-walls are insulated. I reduce the number of frames to 7-8 and fill the rest of the hive with jackopor insulation. I do not know the English brand name for it, it is pink and hard foam. The bees do not eat it as they might with isopor.
                        There is a mesh at the bottom of the hives. This remains open during the winter. It is said that the cold temperature is not a problem but humidity is. I have experienced that it is correct. I record the sound of the bees from time to time with my telephone and they are all alive for the time being.
                        Kamil

                        --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Alan Fox <alan_foxy2000@...> wrote:

                        >
                        > Kamil
                        >          I read Millers book and about him putting dry sugar in the hive then
                        > pouring water over it. Do you put it on top of the crown board above a honey
                        > super. How do you winter your hives , I think it might be a bit colder where you
                        > are , than England. Alan
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: Kamil <kamildursun@...>
                        > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 14:09:32
                        > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?
                        >
                        >
                         
                        > Hi,
                        > During the nectar flow, we have some dry sugar in the hives here in Norway. This
                        > is meant to be backup if the nectar flow stops. Bees do not eat the dry sugar
                        > unless they have to. Neither can they make honey from it. This way we avoid
                        > starvation and false honey. It is allowed to feed the bees organic sugar for us
                        > who are approved as organic beekeepers.
                        > Kamil
                        >
                        > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Thanks for the great reply. I learned something.
                        > >
                        > > NCBootMan
                        > >
                        > > From: Mike S
                        > > Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 10:10 PM
                        > > To:
                        ymailto="mailto:Beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com">Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                        > > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --- On Sun, 1/23/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@> wrote:If your bees have
                        > >sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water?
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage
                        > >early spring buildup. That is especially useful for some areas of the country
                        > >such as mine (southwest Albama). The nectar flow starts early here and getting
                        > >the hive population built up early helps to produce a larger honey crop than if
                        > >the bees were left to build up naturally a couple of weeks later. The syrup
                        > >feeding will cease once the regular early spring nectar flows start and the
                        > >syrup can be taken off. However, care must be taken
                        that the bees have enough
                        > >resources to ensure continued health and growth if the early spring flow should
                        > >suddenly cease. A number of colony deaths can be attributed to starvation after
                        > >the spring buildup begins.
                        > >
                        > > Mike in LA
                        > >
                        >


                      • Kamil
                        Hi Alan, I use the Norwegian standard hive. It is 380x380 mm inner dim and 170 mm high. 10 frames. This is the low type I use. The standard is 270 mm. high but
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jan 28, 2011
                          Hi Alan,
                          I use the Norwegian standard hive. It is 380x380 mm inner dim and 170 mm high. 10 frames. This is the low type I use. The standard is 270 mm. high but I do not use this. Rather use two lows instead. Standard hives made of 100% styrofoam are for sale here in Norway. They have a thickness of 45 mm. I build my hives with two 10 mm thick boards and 25 mm. insulation sandwitched in between. This seems to work and is much cheaper. Besides I like doing some handiwork. I have also heard of people who build their hives from 32 mm. thick massive board but they get heavy especially when full of honey.
                          They say that the cold is not the real problem for the bees. Humidity in a closed hive is worse. It can be -22 to -27 degrees celcius for some weeks during the winter here on the island where I live. This year we had constand cold weather for two months before Christmas and it still is below -10. The bees do not seem to mind this even with open mesh at the bottom. Experienced people say that they have less winter-loss after they started to use mesh bottoms. Some people close the bottom of the hive during late winter and early spring because this is the time with storms.
                          I am new to beekeeping, only two seasons behind me. Last year I had a lot of problems with dead queens in the middle of the season so some of the hives gave very little honey. The healthy ones give around 20 kg. per season. There is not much nectar flow during the summer here, much of the honey comes from heather in fall. I do not transport my hives.
                          Kamil

                          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Alan Fox <alan_foxy2000@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi Kamil
                          >               What type of hive do you use  and what is the thickness of the
                          > insulation on the side walls of the hives. The beekeepers that I've spoken to
                          > about insulation mainly use polystyrene wrapped in tin foil.
                          >
                          >          Even with insulation on the walls of the hive you'd have thought that
                          > the temperature would drop really low with open mesh floors that are left open
                          > to the elements. What is a usual night temperature in winter over there.
                          >
                          >         Do you have a problem with varroa.
                          >         What is your average honey crop for a season. Alan
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: Kamil <kamildursun@...>
                          > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 15:18:56
                          > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?
                          >
                          >  
                          > Hi Alan,
                          > I have the dry sugar on the crown board at the top of the super. I do not pour
                          > water on it. Sometimes the sugar gets hard because of the humidity in the hive.
                          > In this case I replace the sugar.
                          > I live at southern Norway but it can be cold here. Especially this year it has
                          > been very cold before Christmas. I do not do anything special for wintering. The
                          > hive-walls are insulated. I reduce the number of frames to 7-8 and fill the rest
                          > of the hive with jackopor insulation. I do not know the English brand name for
                          > it, it is pink and hard foam. The bees do not eat it as they might with isopor.
                          > There is a mesh at the bottom of the hives. This remains open during the winter.
                          > It is said that the cold temperature is not a problem but humidity is. I have
                          > experienced that it is correct. I record the sound of the bees from time to time
                          > with my telephone and they are all alive for the time being.
                          > Kamil
                          >
                          > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Alan Fox <alan_foxy2000@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Kamil
                          > >          I read Millers book and about him putting dry sugar in the
                          > >hive then
                          > >
                          > > pouring water over it. Do you put it on top of the crown board above a honey
                          > > super. How do you winter your hives , I think it might be a bit colder where
                          > >you
                          > >
                          > > are , than England. Alan
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > ________________________________
                          > > From: Kamil <kamildursun@>
                          > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                          > > Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 14:09:32
                          > > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?
                          > >
                          > >  
                          > > Hi,
                          > > During the nectar flow, we have some dry sugar in the hives here in Norway.
                          > >This
                          > >
                          > > is meant to be backup if the nectar flow stops. Bees do not eat the dry sugar
                          > > unless they have to. Neither can they make honey from it. This way we avoid
                          > > starvation and false honey. It is allowed to feed the bees organic sugar for us
                          > >
                          > > who are approved as organic beekeepers.
                          > > Kamil
                          > >
                          > > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Thanks for the great reply. I learned something.
                          > > >
                          > > > NCBootMan
                          > > >
                          > > > From: Mike S
                          > > > Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 10:10 PM
                          > > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                          > > > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > --- On Sun, 1/23/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@> wrote:If your bees have
                          > > >sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water?
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage
                          > >
                          > > >early spring buildup. That is especially useful for some areas of the country
                          >
                          > > >such as mine (southwest Albama). The nectar flow starts early here and getting
                          > >
                          > > >the hive population built up early helps to produce a larger honey crop than
                          > >if
                          > >
                          > > >the bees were left to build up naturally a couple of weeks later. The syrup
                          > > >feeding will cease once the regular early spring nectar flows start and the
                          > > >syrup can be taken off. However, care must be taken that the bees have enough
                          >
                          > > >resources to ensure continued health and growth if the early spring flow
                          > >should
                          > >
                          > > >suddenly cease. A number of colony deaths can be attributed to starvation
                          > >after
                          > >
                          > > >the spring buildup begins.
                          > > >
                          > > > Mike in LA
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • Kamil
                          Continue: Varroa exists here. We use oxalic acid in late fall and if necessary, formic acid during the season. I have heard that the bees get more resistant to
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jan 28, 2011
                            Continue:
                            Varroa exists here. We use oxalic acid in late fall and if necessary, formic acid during the season. I have heard that the bees get more resistant to varroa if they are allowed to breed in 4.9 mm wax forms. I do not know much about it.
                            We had an outbreak of european foulbrood last year in west-Norway. It is far from here but you never know. Many beekeepers are biting nails about what the next year will bring. It is nasty. Some beekeepers had to burn thousands of hives. The health authorities are trying to limit the damage to the region but I heard that it is highly contagious. Hope it will not spread.
                            Kamil

                            --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Kamil" <kamildursun@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi Alan,
                            > I use the Norwegian standard hive. It is 380x380 mm inner dim and 170 mm high. 10 frames. This is the low type I use. The standard is 270 mm. high but I do not use this. Rather use two lows instead. Standard hives made of 100% styrofoam are for sale here in Norway. They have a thickness of 45 mm. I build my hives with two 10 mm thick boards and 25 mm. insulation sandwitched in between. This seems to work and is much cheaper. Besides I like doing some handiwork. I have also heard of people who build their hives from 32 mm. thick massive board but they get heavy especially when full of honey.
                            > They say that the cold is not the real problem for the bees. Humidity in a closed hive is worse. It can be -22 to -27 degrees celcius for some weeks during the winter here on the island where I live. This year we had constand cold weather for two months before Christmas and it still is below -10. The bees do not seem to mind this even with open mesh at the bottom. Experienced people say that they have less winter-loss after they started to use mesh bottoms. Some people close the bottom of the hive during late winter and early spring because this is the time with storms.
                            > I am new to beekeeping, only two seasons behind me. Last year I had a lot of problems with dead queens in the middle of the season so some of the hives gave very little honey. The healthy ones give around 20 kg. per season. There is not much nectar flow during the summer here, much of the honey comes from heather in fall. I do not transport my hives.
                            > Kamil
                            >
                            > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Alan Fox <alan_foxy2000@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Hi Kamil
                            > >               What type of hive do you use  and what is the thickness of the
                            > > insulation on the side walls of the hives. The beekeepers that I've spoken to
                            > > about insulation mainly use polystyrene wrapped in tin foil.
                            > >
                            > >          Even with insulation on the walls of the hive you'd have thought that
                            > > the temperature would drop really low with open mesh floors that are left open
                            > > to the elements. What is a usual night temperature in winter over there.
                            > >
                            > >         Do you have a problem with varroa.
                            > >         What is your average honey crop for a season. Alan
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > ________________________________
                            > > From: Kamil <kamildursun@>
                            > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                            > > Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 15:18:56
                            > > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?
                            > >
                            > >  
                            > > Hi Alan,
                            > > I have the dry sugar on the crown board at the top of the super. I do not pour
                            > > water on it. Sometimes the sugar gets hard because of the humidity in the hive.
                            > > In this case I replace the sugar.
                            > > I live at southern Norway but it can be cold here. Especially this year it has
                            > > been very cold before Christmas. I do not do anything special for wintering. The
                            > > hive-walls are insulated. I reduce the number of frames to 7-8 and fill the rest
                            > > of the hive with jackopor insulation. I do not know the English brand name for
                            > > it, it is pink and hard foam. The bees do not eat it as they might with isopor.
                            > > There is a mesh at the bottom of the hives. This remains open during the winter.
                            > > It is said that the cold temperature is not a problem but humidity is. I have
                            > > experienced that it is correct. I record the sound of the bees from time to time
                            > > with my telephone and they are all alive for the time being.
                            > > Kamil
                            > >
                            > > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Alan Fox <alan_foxy2000@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Kamil
                            > > >          I read Millers book and about him putting dry sugar in the
                            > > >hive then
                            > > >
                            > > > pouring water over it. Do you put it on top of the crown board above a honey
                            > > > super. How do you winter your hives , I think it might be a bit colder where
                            > > >you
                            > > >
                            > > > are , than England. Alan
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > ________________________________
                            > > > From: Kamil <kamildursun@>
                            > > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                            > > > Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 14:09:32
                            > > > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?
                            > > >
                            > > >  
                            > > > Hi,
                            > > > During the nectar flow, we have some dry sugar in the hives here in Norway.
                            > > >This
                            > > >
                            > > > is meant to be backup if the nectar flow stops. Bees do not eat the dry sugar
                            > > > unless they have to. Neither can they make honey from it. This way we avoid
                            > > > starvation and false honey. It is allowed to feed the bees organic sugar for us
                            > > >
                            > > > who are approved as organic beekeepers.
                            > > > Kamil
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Thanks for the great reply. I learned something.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > NCBootMan
                            > > > >
                            > > > > From: Mike S
                            > > > > Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 10:10 PM
                            > > > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                            > > > > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --- On Sun, 1/23/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@> wrote:If your bees have
                            > > > >sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water?
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage
                            > > >
                            > > > >early spring buildup. That is especially useful for some areas of the country
                            > >
                            > > > >such as mine (southwest Albama). The nectar flow starts early here and getting
                            > > >
                            > > > >the hive population built up early helps to produce a larger honey crop than
                            > > >if
                            > > >
                            > > > >the bees were left to build up naturally a couple of weeks later. The syrup
                            > > > >feeding will cease once the regular early spring nectar flows start and the
                            > > > >syrup can be taken off. However, care must be taken that the bees have enough
                            > >
                            > > > >resources to ensure continued health and growth if the early spring flow
                            > > >should
                            > > >
                            > > > >suddenly cease. A number of colony deaths can be attributed to starvation
                            > > >after
                            > > >
                            > > > >the spring buildup begins.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Mike in LA
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • Alan Fox
                            Hi Kamil                It was interesting reading that you use insulated boards to make your hives from. I m always looking at different
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jan 29, 2011
                              Hi Kamil
                                             It was interesting reading that you use insulated boards to make your hives from. I'm always looking at different materials that can be used to make hives with. I have mainly use 18mm board. As I'm in the construction industry I can get off cuts of  a stryrofoam insulation material that has foil on both sides. I was thinking that I could laminate  these with a thin piece of plastic using a contact adhesive then cut them down to the required sizes. The British National that I use has a 225mm deep brood chamber and honey supers of 150mm approx outside sizes are 460mm square. Alan


                              From: Kamil <kamildursun@...>
                              To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 17:08:05
                              Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?

                               

                              Hi Alan,
                              I use the Norwegian standard hive. It is 380x380 mm inner dim and 170 mm high. 10 frames. This is the low type I use. The standard is 270 mm. high but I do not use this. Rather use two lows instead. Standard hives made of 100% styrofoam are for sale here in Norway. They have a thickness of 45 mm. I build my hives with two 10 mm thick boards and 25 mm. insulation sandwitched in between. This seems to work and is much cheaper. Besides I like doing some handiwork. I have also heard of people who build their hives from 32 mm. thick massive board but they get heavy especially when full of honey.
                              They say that the cold is not the real problem for the bees. Humidity in a closed hive is worse. It can be -22 to -27 degrees celcius for some weeks during the winter here on the island where I live. This year we had constand cold weather for two months before Christmas and it still is below -10. The bees do not seem to mind this even with open mesh at the bottom. Experienced people say that they have less winter-loss after they started to use mesh bottoms. Some people close the bottom of the hive during late winter and early spring because this is the time with storms.
                              I am new to beekeeping, only two seasons behind me. Last year I had a lot of problems with dead queens in the middle of the season so some of the hives gave very little honey. The healthy ones give around 20 kg. per season. There is not much nectar flow during the summer here, much of the honey comes from heather in fall. I do not transport my hives.
                              Kamil

                              --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Alan Fox <alan_foxy2000@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi Kamil
                              >               What type of hive do you use  and what is the thickness of the
                              > insulation on the side walls of the hives. The beekeepers that I've spoken to
                              > about insulation mainly use polystyrene wrapped in tin foil.
                              >
                              >          Even with insulation on the walls of the hive you'd have thought that
                              > the temperature would drop really low with open mesh floors that are left open
                              > to the elements. What is a usual night temperature in winter over there.
                              >
                              >         Do you have a problem with varroa.
                              >         What is your average honey crop for a season. Alan
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ________________________________
                              > From: Kamil <kamildursun@...>
                              > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 15:18:56
                              > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?
                              >
                              >  
                              > Hi Alan,
                              > I have the dry sugar on the crown board at the top of the super. I do not pour
                              > water on it. Sometimes the sugar gets hard because of the humidity in the hive.
                              > In this case I replace the sugar.
                              > I live at southern Norway but it can be cold here. Especially this year it has
                              > been very cold before Christmas. I do not do anything special for wintering. The
                              > hive-walls are insulated. I reduce the number of frames to 7-8 and fill the rest
                              > of the hive with jackopor insulation. I do not know the English brand name for
                              > it, it is pink and hard foam. The bees do not eat it as they might with isopor.
                              > There is a mesh at the bottom of the hives. This remains open during the winter.
                              > It is said that the cold temperature is not a problem but humidity is. I have
                              > experienced that it is correct. I record the sound of the bees from time to time
                              > with my telephone and they are all alive for the time being.
                              > Kamil
                              >
                              > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Alan Fox <alan_foxy2000@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Kamil
                              > >          I read Millers book and about him putting dry sugar in the
                              > >hive then
                              > >
                              > > pouring water over it. Do you put it on top of the crown board above a honey
                              > > super. How do you winter your hives , I think it might be a bit colder where
                              > >you
                              > >
                              > > are , than England. Alan
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > ________________________________
                              > > From: Kamil <kamildursun@>
                              > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                              > > Sent: Fri, 28 January, 2011 14:09:32
                              > > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: bee feeding?
                              > >
                              > >  
                              > > Hi,
                              > > During the nectar flow, we have some dry sugar in the hives here in Norway.
                              > >This
                              > >
                              > > is meant to be backup if the nectar flow stops. Bees do not eat the dry sugar
                              > > unless they have to. Neither can they make honey from it. This way we avoid
                              > > starvation and false honey. It is allowed to feed the bees organic sugar for us
                              > >
                              > > who are approved as organic beekeepers.
                              > > Kamil
                              > >
                              > > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "NCBootman" <ncbootman@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Thanks for the great reply. I learned something.
                              > > >
                              > > > NCBootMan
                              > > >
                              > > > From: Mike S
                              > > > Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 10:10 PM
                              > > > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                              > > > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] bee feeding?
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > --- On Sun, 1/23/11, NCBootman <ncbootman@> wrote:If your bees have
                              > > >sufficient honey, why are you feeding with sugar water?
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > Feeding bees a light syrup supplemented with pollen substitute will encourage
                              > >
                              > > >early spring buildup. That is especially useful for some areas of the country
                              >
                              > > >such as mine (southwest Albama). The nectar flow starts early here and getting
                              > >
                              > > >the hive population built up early helps to produce a larger honey crop than
                              > >if
                              > >
                              > > >the bees were left to build up naturally a couple of weeks later. The syrup
                              > > >feeding will cease once the regular early spring nectar flows start and the
                              > > >syrup can be taken off. However, care must be taken that the bees have enough
                              >
                              > > >resources to ensure continued health and growth if the early spring flow
                              > >should
                              > >
                              > > >suddenly cease. A number of colony deaths can be attributed to starvation
                              > >after
                              > >
                              > > >the spring buildup begins.
                              > > >
                              > > > Mike in LA
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >


                            • Stephen Johnson
                              Are you sure they can get the sugar water out and it is not frozen or clogged?
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jan 31, 2011
                                Are you sure they can get the sugar water out and it is not frozen or clogged?

                                On Sun, Jan 23, 2011 at 5:55 AM, rzep <wrzep@...> wrote:
                                 

                                My bees seem indifferent to the sugar water provided. A liter bottle will go several weeks unconsummed. By visual inspection the bees seem(?) healthy. Could it be that they prefer there own honey instead? Is the cold a factor? Near record cold in Central Georgia earlier, but now more seasonal. Ideas?


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