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Re: New to Group - First Hives

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  • Stephen Johnson
    It sounds like you ve really done your homework and are ready to go! Providing there is plenty of food for the bees, only a couple feet of spacing is needed.
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 30, 2010
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      It sounds like you've really done your homework and are ready to go!  Providing there is plenty of food for the bees, only a couple feet of spacing is needed.  Some would say even inches, but you do want to have space to be able to get between the hives.  As for distance from the fence - it's all a matter of geometry of your neighbors being able to see the hive.  And I don't know what kind of plants grow in Texas, sorry.


      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "djbrzoska" <dan@...> wrote:
      > Hi all. I've been looking at past posts and photos and could use some help. The wife is preparing to keep bees this spring. Two 8 frame hives and bees are ordered. I'm making sure we have a good location for everything. I have a nice early morning sunny spot that is shaded in the hot Texas afternoon sun. A few questions. How far apart should I place the two hives? How much room should I leave behind the hives to the 6 foot privacy fence? I would like to have some plantings around the hives to help them blend into the surroundings. Any suggestions or warnings? Many Thanks!
      >



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    • james macilveen
      An important consideration that I have not seen mentioned is a fresh water supply within a 5 mile radius since bees will work a 5 mile radius, Jim MacIlveen
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 30, 2010
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        An important consideration that I have not seen mentioned is a fresh water supply within a 5 mile radius since bees will work a 5 mile radius, Jim MacIlveen Alabama Beekeepers Association
         

        From: Stephen Johnson <reeferret@...>
        To: "beekeeping@yahoogroups.com" <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sat, January 30, 2010 9:50:34 AM
        Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: New to Group - First Hives

         

        It sounds like you've really done your homework and are ready to go!  Providing there is plenty of food for the bees, only a couple feet of spacing is needed.  Some would say even inches, but you do want to have space to be able to get between the hives.  As for distance from the fence - it's all a matter of geometry of your neighbors being able to see the hive.  And I don't know what kind of plants grow in Texas, sorry.


        --- In Beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com, "djbrzoska" <dan@...> wrote:
        > Hi all. I've been looking at past posts and photos and could use some help. The wife is preparing to keep bees this spring. Two 8 frame hives and bees are ordered. I'm making sure we have a good location for everything. I have a nice early morning sunny spot that is shaded in the hot Texas afternoon sun. A few questions. How far apart should I place the two hives? How much room should I leave behind the hives to the 6 foot privacy fence? I would like to have some plantings around the hives to help them blend into the surroundings. Any suggestions or warnings? Many Thanks!
        >



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      • djbrzoska
        Thanks! They will have a few million gallons worth of lake within a mile, but I might have to leave some (birdbath?) just outside their door.
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 30, 2010
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          Thanks!

          They will have a few million gallons worth of lake within a mile, but I might have to leave some (birdbath?) just outside their door.

          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, james macilveen <seniormac@...> wrote:
          >
          > An important consideration that I have not seen mentioned is a fresh water supply within a 5 mile radius since bees will work a 5 mile radius, Jim MacIlveen Alabama Beekeepers Association
          >
        • fFrank Mong
          If you are going to put out something like a bird bath there are a few things to keep in mind. Make sure to have something in the water that floats like a
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 31, 2010
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            If you are going to put out something like a bird bath there are a few things to keep in mind. Make sure to have something in the water that floats like a piece of wood or styofoam.If not you will have a lot of drowned bees, The other important thing is to keep the water fresh.If you let the water get stagnant the bees will fly right over it and go to the nearest fresh water they can find.

          • Peggy Willenberg
            I have watched my bees at various water sources and it is interesting to see what they pick. I have a swimming pool, several birdbaths, and a small pond.
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 31, 2010
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              I have watched my bees at various water sources and it is interesting to see what they pick.  I have a swimming pool, several birdbaths, and a small pond.  They are ONLY interested in the pond--I think they like it that they can walk in the mushy edges without worrying about drowning.. This area is also of great interest to butterflies because it is muddy.
               
              I would try to create something as natural as possible, like bury the birdbath basin in the ground and have a muddy or gravelly edge.  I think you will find the bees choose this and leave everything else alone.
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, January 31, 2010 11:07 AM
              Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: New to Group - First Hives

              If you are going to put out something like a bird bath there are a few things to keep in mind. Make sure to have something in the water that floats like a piece of wood or styofoam.If not you will have a lot of drowned bees, The other important thing is to keep the water fresh.If you let the water get stagnant the bees will fly right over it and go to the nearest fresh water they can find.

            • Mike S
              ... ........ If you let the water get stagnant the bees will fly right over it and go to the nearest fresh water they can find. There have been discussions
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 31, 2010
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                --- On Sun, 1/31/10, fFrank Mong <spur0303@...> wrote:
                ........ If you let the water get stagnant the bees will fly right over it and go to the nearest fresh water they can find.

                There have been discussions concerning observations where bees will gather water from "contaminated" areas where cattle have trampled the ground and rain water has collected and have avoided sources of "clean" water.   Why?    I donno.     Mike in LA

              • Barbara Lindberg
                I ve heard the best way to provide water is with a plastic kid s pool with sand in it to make a beach for the bees to stand on. Any size plastic container
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 31, 2010
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                  I’ve heard the best way to provide water is with a plastic kid’s pool with sand in it to make a beach for the bees to stand on.  Any size plastic container with sand would work.

                   

                  Barbara

                  Ontario, Canada

                   

                  www.thebeejournal.blogspot.com

                  www.bee-magic.blogspot.com for kids


                  From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Peggy Willenberg
                  Sent: January 31, 2010 1:03 PM
                  To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: New to Group - First Hives

                   

                   

                  I have watched my bees at various water sources and it is interesting to see what they pick.  I have a swimming pool, several birdbaths, and a small pond.  They are ONLY interested in the pond--I think they like it that they can walk in the mushy edges without worrying about drowning.. This area is also of great interest to butterflies because it is muddy.

                   

                  I would try to create something as natural as possible, like bury the birdbath basin in the ground and have a muddy or gravelly edge.  I think you will find the bees choose this and leave everything else alone.

                  ----- Original Message -----

                  Sent: Sunday, January 31, 2010 11:07 AM

                  Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: New to Group - First Hives

                   

                  If you are going to put out something like a bird bath there are a few things to keep in mind. Make sure to have something in the water that floats like a piece of wood or styofoam.If not you will have a lot of drowned bees, The other important thing is to keep the water fresh.If you let the water get stagnant the bees will fly right over it and go to the nearest fresh water they can find.

                   

                • Barbara Lindberg
                  This practise reminds me of butterflies that will land on poop and lick it and also mud puddles - I think that s called mudding. With the poop I believe it s
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jan 31, 2010
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                    This practise reminds me of butterflies that will land on poop and lick it and also mud puddles – I think that’s called mudding.  With the poop I believe it’s minerals and salts they are probably after.  In Africa elephants are known to go to certain caves to lick the rocks for the same reason.  There must be something there that tastes good or is good for them.

                     

                    Barbara

                    Ontario, Canada

                     


                    From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mike S
                    Sent: January 31, 2010 1:07 PM
                    To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: New to Group - First Hives

                     

                     

                    --- On Sun, 1/31/10, fFrank Mong <spur0303@yahoo. com> wrote:
                    ........ If you let the water get stagnant the bees will fly right over it and go to the nearest fresh water they can find.

                    There have been discussions concerning observations where bees will gather water from "contaminated" areas where cattle have trampled the ground and rain water has collected and have avoided sources of "clean" water.   Why?    I donno.     Mike in LA

                     

                  • Rich
                    An alternative to a sand beach would be to grow duck weed on the surface which would act as a landing pad as well as help to reduce evaporation.
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jan 31, 2010
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                      An alternative to a sand beach would be to grow duck weed on the surface which would act as a landing pad as well as help to reduce evaporation.


                      ---- Barbara Lindberg <barblindberg@...> wrote:
                      > I've heard the best way to provide water is with a plastic kid's pool with
                      > sand in it to make a beach for the bees to stand on. Any size plastic
                      > container with sand would work.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Barbara
                      >
                      > Ontario, Canada
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > www.thebeejournal.blogspot.com <http://www.thebeejournal.blogspot.com/>
                      >
                      > www.bee-magic.blogspot.com <http://www.bee-magic.blogspot.com/> for kids
                      >
                      > _____
                      >
                      > From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On
                      > Behalf Of Peggy Willenberg
                      > Sent: January 31, 2010 1:03 PM
                      > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: New to Group - First Hives
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I have watched my bees at various water sources and it is interesting to see
                      > what they pick. I have a swimming pool, several birdbaths, and a small
                      > pond. They are ONLY interested in the pond--I think they like it that they
                      > can walk in the mushy edges without worrying about drowning.. This area is
                      > also of great interest to butterflies because it is muddy.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I would try to create something as natural as possible, like bury the
                      > birdbath basin in the ground and have a muddy or gravelly edge. I think you
                      > will find the bees choose this and leave everything else alone.
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      >
                      > From: fFrank Mong <mailto:spur0303@...>
                      >
                      > To: Beekeeping@yahoogro <mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com> ups.com
                      >
                      > Sent: Sunday, January 31, 2010 11:07 AM
                      >
                      > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: New to Group - First Hives
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > If you are going to put out something like a bird bath there are a few
                      > things to keep in mind. Make sure to have something in the water that floats
                      > like a piece of wood or styofoam.If not you will have a lot of drowned bees,
                      > The other important thing is to keep the water fresh.If you let the water
                      > get stagnant the bees will fly right over it and go to the nearest fresh
                      > water they can find.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • bgram68
                      I started watering my bees in a 5 gallon bucket and plank under the garden spiggot. It worked well, but it did have growth issues. Next I upgraded to a
                      Message 10 of 12 , Mar 18 2:23 PM
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                        I started watering my bees in a 5 gallon bucket and plank under the garden spiggot. It worked well, but it did have growth issues. Next I upgraded to a concrete bird bath. I was careful to select a birdbath that has gently sloping sides, and the bees have no trouble getting water without drowning. I do have a 1x1x10 inch board to help any that get caught in the middle of the bath. Works great. Now I need a float to auto-fill.
                        B.
                      • Jeff
                        Hi, Good luck with your new hive. I was hoping for my first hive this year, but it will probably be next year. Something you could try with your Bird Bath is
                        Message 11 of 12 , Mar 19 8:09 AM
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                          Hi, Good luck with your new hive. I was hoping for my first hive this year, but it will probably be next year. Something you could try with your Bird Bath is to fill it to the water level with gravel. Then the bees could walk on the gravel and drink, but never get deep enough to drown. I once had a green house / nursery and did everything organically, and that's how I would water the ladybugs.
                          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "bgram68" <bgram68@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I started watering my bees in a 5 gallon bucket and plank under the garden spiggot. It worked well, but it did have growth issues. Next I upgraded to a concrete bird bath. I was careful to select a birdbath that has gently sloping sides, and the bees have no trouble getting water without drowning. I do have a 1x1x10 inch board to help any that get caught in the middle of the bath. Works great. Now I need a float to auto-fill.
                          > B.
                          >
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