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Re: One of my hives isn't capping their honey - why?mead

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  • toad08551
    ... My understanding is that the bees will not cap the honey until the moisture content is correct. This is my understanding also, so that s why I m curious.
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 11, 2009
      anyone got any good sites or links for making mead??? i'm a new beek and would like to try to make some mead roger NJ--- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "twotortu" <melarris@...> wrote:
      > Dan,
      "My understanding is that the bees will not cap the honey until the moisture content is correct."
      This is my understanding also, so that's why I'm curious. This is my largest, strongest hive. It had five shallow supers filled this season and is still strong. I wonder if it was one too many supers..
      I have a neighbor who makes mead. Maybe I'll remove and extract this separately and save it for him.
      Melissa
      My understanding is that the bees will not cap the honey until the moisture content is correct. It takes some effort on the bee’s part to dry the honey. Is this a weak hive where there was not enough bees to support the drying process? I have been told too much uncured (too much moisture) can result in fermentation. If's it's a small % of the other honey you have you could mix it in. If you have a lot I would make sure it's stored seperately or try making mead.
    • David Laird
      I am new to the group.  Been beekeeping only two years.  Melissa, I had the same problem with some of my frames this year. Before finding this group, I read
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 11, 2009
        I am new to the group.  Been beekeeping only two years.  Melissa, I had the same problem with some of my frames this year. Before finding this group, I read some threads in beekeeping forums and find this is something many have had a problem with.  While the responses varied as they have in this group, one particular beekeeper said that when he takes a frame of honey out and it is not capped, gives it one good shake.  If any honey comes out it is still green and however, if it all stays in the comb, then it can be harvested. He says he has never had honey ferment when using this.    I tried that this year, only time will tell if his method works.
         
        David

        --- On Fri, 9/11/09, twotortu <melarris@...> wrote:

        From: twotortu <melarris@...>
        Subject: [Beekeeping] One of my hives isn't capping their honey - why?
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, September 11, 2009, 10:06 AM

         
        Hello -

        I have four hives and have been beekeeping for about six years. I've never seen this before. I have one hive where the honey is mostly uncapped. It doesn't drip out of the cells when held sideways (I live in a very dry climate). Should go ahead and take it? All of my other hives are capping their honey like normal.

        Any ideas?

        Thanks!

        Melissa


      • Barbara Lindberg
        I had several frames on one hive that they haven t capped yet too. A beek friend said sometimes they put the frames in a room with a dehumidifier to remove
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 11, 2009

          I had several frames on one hive that they haven’t capped yet too.  A beek friend said sometimes they put the frames in a room with a dehumidifier to remove some of the water.  He also mentioned that he thought it would be okay to extract because of the dry weather we’ve had the last week or so.  I opted to leave the frames a couple more weeks and then check back.  I think if it’s not capped I’ll try the dehumidifier.

           

          You’re right about many different answers….

           

          Barbara

          Ontario, Canada

           


          From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of David Laird
          Sent: September 11, 2009 8:07 PM
          To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] One of my hives isn't capping their honey - why?

           

           

          I am new to the group.  Been beekeeping only two years.  Melissa, I had the same problem with some of my frames this year. Before finding this group, I read some threads in beekeeping forums and find this is something many have had a problem with.  While the responses varied as they have in this group, one particular beekeeper said that when he takes a frame of honey out and it is not capped, gives it one good shake.  If any honey comes out it is still green and however, if it all stays in the comb, then it can be harvested. He says he has never had honey ferment when using this.    I tried that this year, only time will tell if his method works.

           

          David

          --- On Fri, 9/11/09, twotortu <melarris@frontierne t.net> wrote:


          From: twotortu <melarris@frontierne t.net>
          Subject: [Beekeeping] One of my hives isn't capping their honey - why?
          To: Beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com
          Date: Friday, September 11, 2009, 10:06 AM

           

          Hello -

          I have four hives and have been beekeeping for about six years. I've never seen this before. I have one hive where the honey is mostly uncapped. It doesn't drip out of the cells when held sideways (I live in a very dry climate). Should go ahead and take it? All of my other hives are capping their honey like normal.

          Any ideas?

          Thanks!

          Melissa

           

        • Nathan Sarvis
          I have a hive that s healthy & producing, but the wooden box it s in is cracked and deteriorating. I d like to put it in a new hive. I haven t done it before.
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 12, 2009
            I have a hive that's healthy & producing, but the wooden box it's in is cracked and deteriorating. I'd like to put it in a new hive. I haven't done it before. Any suggestions on how to change boxes without causing any damage?
             
            Thanks!
             
            Nathan
          • marco5819
            Nathan, just get the empty box, put it next to the hive and remove each frame from the old box and put it in the same order in the new box, then remove the old
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 16, 2009
              Nathan,
              just get the empty box, put it next to the hive and remove each frame from the old box and put it in the same order in the new box, then remove the old box and knock out any remaining bees on the top of the frames , leave any stragglers to find ther way home.. they will.. its pretty simple procedure...

              Mark



              > I have a hive that's healthy & producing, but the wooden box it's in is cracked and deteriorating. I'd like to put it in a new hive. I haven't done it before. Any suggestions on how to change boxes without causing any damage?
              >
              > Thanks!
              >
              > Nathan
              >
            • marco5819
              Nathan, just get the empty box, put it next to the hive and remove each frame from the old box and put it in the same order in the new box, then remove the old
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 16, 2009
                Nathan,
                just get the empty box, put it next to the hive and remove each frame from the old box and put it in the same order in the new box, then remove the old box and knock out any remaining bees on the top of the frames , leave any stragglers to find ther way home.. they will.. its pretty simple procedure...

                Mark



                > I have a hive that's healthy & producing, but the wooden box it's in is cracked and deteriorating. I'd like to put it in a new hive. I haven't done it before. Any suggestions on how to change boxes without causing any damage?
                >
                > Thanks!
                >
                > Nathan
                >
              • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
                There s always more than one way. one is to dress up and smoke and transfer frames. Another is to nadir, or sun, as opposed to supering. Bees in a tree cavity
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 16, 2009
                  There's always more than one way.
                  one is to dress up and smoke and transfer frames.

                  Another is to nadir, or sun, as opposed to supering.
                  Bees in a tree cavity strat at the top and work downward.
                  You add a new box, below.

                  The Warre" folks do this and almost only, this.
                  Eventually the box involved works it's way to becoming on top,
                  & a honey box, albeit with honey in old brood comb, as opposed
                  to cut-comb worthy honey.

                  Nadiring, if the entire hive is lifted by pals as you slip a box under,
                  what I term, subbing, , tends to be almost unnoticed by the bees.
                  Warre' folks are non-invasive.

                  BillSF9c

                  >I have a hive that's healthy & producing, but the wooden box it's in
                  is cracked
                  and deteriorating. I'd like to put it in a new hive. I haven't done it
                  before.
                  Any suggestions on how to change boxes without causing any damage?

                  Thanks!

                  Nathan
                • Nathan Sarvis
                  Thanks! I assumed it wasn t too difficult, but just wanted to make sure I wasn t going to cause any problems. Nathan ... From: marco5819 To:
                  Message 8 of 11 , Sep 16, 2009
                    Thanks! I assumed it wasn't too difficult, but just wanted to make sure I wasn't going to cause any problems.
                     
                    Nathan
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: marco5819
                    Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2009 1:32 PM
                    Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Moving hive to new box.

                     

                    Nathan,
                    just get the empty box, put it next to the hive and remove each frame from the old box and put it in the same order in the new box, then remove the old box and knock out any remaining bees on the top of the frames , leave any stragglers to find ther way home.. they will.. its pretty simple procedure...

                    Mark

                    > I have a hive that's healthy & producing, but the wooden box it's in is cracked and deteriorating. I'd like to put it in a new hive. I haven't done it before. Any suggestions on how to change boxes without causing any damage?
                    >
                    > Thanks!
                    >
                    > Nathan
                    >

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