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Re: Top feeder issues

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  • roger
    Message 1 of 18 , Jul 1, 2009
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      I used chick waterers in empty deep on top this spring and worked great. put lil sticks for floaters to keep bees from drowning. Also used some rough sandpaper to sand plastic so bees had better traction to walk op sides. roger NJ--- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen Epstein" <stephen@...> wrote:
      >
      > Does the water drip out?
      >
      > > I made a feeder using a mason jar. I punched tiny holes in the lid (that's
      > > the key, they need to be as small as possible), filled with sugar water,
      > > and then just turned it upside down on top of the frames with an empty
      > > super on top to enclose it. When the bees are really hungry, you'll have
      > > to fill it nearly every day, but I didn't have any drowned bees :o)
      > >
      > > :
      >
      > --
      > Stephen Epstein
      >
      > http://www.bigdipperphotos.com
      >
    • mlcales
      They still had plenty of room in the brood box, so they were staying busy down there. I was also re-filling it every day, or every other, so I would have been
      Message 2 of 18 , Jul 1, 2009
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        They still had plenty of room in the brood box, so they were staying busy down there. I was also re-filling it every day, or every other, so I would have been able to remove any stray comb if they had started. Keep in mind, I am keeping my bees as naturally as possible, and am only feeding them when there isn't any nectar to be had. Once the nectar flow starts (and it finally has here in the mountains in Southern California), the feeder is taken away, it's not a permanent part of the hive.

        --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen Epstein" <stephen@...> wrote:
        >
        > With all that extra space from the super, do they start building comb on
        > the jar and walls?
        >
        > Stephen Epstein
        >
        > www.anotherdooropens.com
        >
        > > No, when you turn the jar over, very little should come out. If it drips,
        > > the holes are too big. Also, poke the holes from the outside of the lid
        > > toward the inside, so it dimples inward. That, combined with the seal
        > > formed when you turn it over, keeps it from pouring out, and the bees can
        > > get their tiny tongue in the holes to feed. I was pleasantly surprised by
        > > how well it worked.
        > >
        > > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen Epstein" <stephen@> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> Does the water drip out?
        > >>
        > >> > I made a feeder using a mason jar. I punched tiny holes in the lid
        > >> (that's
        > >> > the key, they need to be as small as possible), filled with sugar
        > >> water,
        > >> > and then just turned it upside down on top of the frames with an empty
        > >> > super on top to enclose it. When the bees are really hungry, you'll
        > >> have
        > >> > to fill it nearly every day, but I didn't have any drowned bees :o)
        > >> >
        > >> > :
        > >>
        > >> --
        > >> Stephen Epstein
        > >>
        > >> http://www.bigdipperphotos.com
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Stephen Epstein
        >
        > http://www.bigdipperphotos.com
        >
      • fFrank Mong
        The eaisest way to feed with a jar feeder and not have a bunch of comb built in the empty super used as a cover is as follows.Make a wooden block about 5
        Message 3 of 18 , Jul 1, 2009
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          The eaisest way to feed with a jar feeder and not have a bunch of comb built in the empty super used as a cover is as follows.Make a wooden block about 5" square and cut a circle in the center that just fits over the jar top.Add 1" strips the whole way aroung the perimiter of the block that is just larger than the oval shaped hole in the center on an inner cover.Put the inner cover on top of the hive body over the frames.Sit the jar with the block attached over the hole in the inner cover,put an empty super in place then put a top cover on.Because the strips completely surround the hole in the inner cover the bees only have access to the bottom of the jar and can't get out into the empty super.


          From: Stephen Epstein <stephen@...>
          To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 3:50:04 AM
          Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: Top feeder issues

          Does the water drip out?

          > I made a feeder using a mason jar. I punched tiny holes in the lid (that's
          > the key, they need to be as small as possible), filled with sugar water,
          > and then just turned it upside down on top of the frames with an empty
          > super on top to enclose it. When the bees are really hungry, you'll have
          > to fill it nearly every day, but I didn't have any drowned bees :o)
          >
          > :

          --
          Stephen Epstein

          http://www.bigdipperphotos.com


        • Michael
          It s hard to describe without a graphic, but I think Martin s sliced egg description is one of the better one s I ve seen. There are some good pictures of the
          Message 4 of 18 , Jul 1, 2009
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            It's hard to describe without a graphic, but I think Martin's sliced egg description is one of the better one's I've seen. There are some good pictures of the layout of the hive in Dewey Caron's "Honey Bee Biology and Beekeeping" (which is an excellent text, by the way. interlibrary loan should have it- I think it's out of print now.)
            >
            > On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 8:57 AM, alice.wahl<CallWahl@...> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > I don't understand how bees get into a ball during the winter. Don't the
            > > frames get in the way?
            > >
            > > Alice
            > >
            > >
            >
          • jason rapsis
            Thanks everyone for the advice, I m sure it will help. Jason.
            Message 5 of 18 , Jul 3, 2009
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              Thanks everyone for the advice, I'm sure it will help.
              Jason.

              --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen Epstein" <stephen@...> wrote:
              >
              > Does the water drip out?
              >
              > > I made a feeder using a mason jar. I punched tiny holes in the lid (that's
              > > the key, they need to be as small as possible), filled with sugar water,
              > > and then just turned it upside down on top of the frames with an empty
              > > super on top to enclose it. When the bees are really hungry, you'll have
              > > to fill it nearly every day, but I didn't have any drowned bees :o)
              > >
              > > :
              >
              > --
              > Stephen Epstein
              >
              > http://www.bigdipperphotos.com
              >
            • Barbara Lindberg
              Can anyone advise approximately how long it takes bees to build comb in a medium sized super? Barbara Ontario, Canada _____ From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 18 , Jul 5, 2009
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                Can anyone advise approximately how long it takes bees to build comb in a medium sized super?

                 

                Barbara

                Ontario, Canada

                 


                From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of russell spencer
                Sent: June 30, 2009 7:49 PM
                To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Building Comb in Honey Super

                 

                keep the feeder on barbra...takes alot to build comb...

                --- On Tue, 6/30/09, Barbara Lindberg <barblindberg@ rogers.com> wrote:


                From: Barbara Lindberg <barblindberg@ rogers.com>
                Subject: [Beekeeping] Building Comb in Honey Super
                To: Beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com
                Date: Tuesday, June 30, 2009, 4:40 PM

                My 2 new nuc hives have just reached their 7 of 10 frames of built comb with capped and uncapped brood in the deep so I’ve added a honey super.  I debated about whether I should leave the hive top feeder on to give them feed because they have to build the comb in the super which has wax coated foundation.  Any opinions about the feeding?  Should I keep feeding them until they build the comb or stop taking the feed?

                 

                Barbara

                Ontario, Canada

                http://thebeejourna l.blogspot. com/

                 

                http://barbarasspot ontheblog. blogspot. com

                 

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