Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Beekeeping] Checking on My Hive -- some questions

Expand Messages
  • axeman axeman
    If the bees are bringing in pollen most likely the queen is alive and laying. Not spotting the queen does not mean she isn t there. All I look forĀ is a good
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 2, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      If the bees are bringing in pollen most likely the queen is alive and laying.
      Not spotting the queen does not mean she isn't there.
      All I look for is a good brood pattern. Makes no difference to me if I see her or not.
       
      Alan, Lakeview, NY

      --- On Tue, 6/2/09, Bill Bird <billbird2111@...> wrote:

      From: Bill Bird <billbird2111@...>
      Subject: [Beekeeping] Checking on My Hive -- some questions
      To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, June 2, 2009, 6:43 PM

      OK,

      I've been putting this off for weeks -- busy with gardening planting and the like. But -- I've got to get back into that hive and check things out -- check progress on "my package."

      The last time I went into the hive -- to remove burr comb buildup and get a missing slat in -- resulted in success -- but it also resulted in three bee stings.

      It's not that they hurt, but -- well -- the last one did.

      But I've got to check on things and I was hoping to get some advice from you (I'm the one with that Hello Kitty Pink Beehive).

      1. I know I need to check on comb production -- and making sure that the queen is doing what she's supposed to be doing.

      2. I need to check all slats, and if I discover that the box is now filling up with bees -- I should probably invest in a second hive body. You know, build up the hive so to speak.

      But -- here's one thing that gets me -- because the discussion has been about queens lately.

      I will not only be looking for production out of the queen, but the queen herself. She's marked, so I hope I find her.

      IF -- however, I discover that the hive is building queen cells at the bottom -- what course of action should I take?

      Should I destroy them? All of them? What if I can't find the queen? Should I still destroy them? Or should I just leave them alone and let nature take its course?

      If I discover that the queen is failing, or not laying eggs in the way that she should, should I allow the queen cells (providing I find any), to keep developing?

      I hope I don't get stung again, but I know I probably will when I start poking around in there. From what I can tell, the hive is very active. I've seen as many as 50-100 bees hanging around at the hive entrance on warm days. And the consumption of sugar water has dropped as they've discovered sources of pollen in the neighborhood.

      At least -- this is what I think. I can't really tell until I open up that hive.

      Suggestions on the queen question ladies and gentlemen? Thank you,

      Bill
      Sacramento, CA


    • Ruary Rudd
      I ll second that, I look for eggs, if I see them then I know the queen was alive and laying within the last three days. I would be worried if there were
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 2, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        I'll second that, I look for eggs, if I see them then I know the queen was
        alive and laying within the last three days.

        I would be worried if there were multiple eggs per cell
        Ruary
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com]On
        Behalf Of axeman axeman
        Sent: 03 June 2009 01:45
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Checking on My Hive -- some questions





        If the bees are bringing in pollen most likely the queen is alive and
        laying.
        Not spotting the queen does not mean she isn't there.
        All I look for is a good brood pattern. Makes no difference to me if I see
        her or not.

        Alan, Lakeview, NY
      • Stephen Epstein
        I put a super on our first hive last week but thought that I read some place that you are not supposed to put frames on that do not have comb on them. Since it
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 2, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          I put a super on our first hive last week but thought that I read some place that you are not supposed to put frames on that do not have comb on them. Since it is a totally new hive I do not have a choice.  Should I keep on feeding the bees so they will have the added strength to make more wax?

          Thanks,
          Stephen Epstein
          
          http://www.anotherdooropens.com
          
          http://www.bigdipperphotos.com
          


        • Mike S
          ... I put a super on our first hive last week but thought that I read some place that you are not supposed to put frames on that do not have comb on them.
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 3, 2009
          • 0 Attachment


            --- On Wed, 6/3/09, Stephen Epstein <stephen@...> wrote:
            I put a super on our first hive last week but thought that I read some place that you are not supposed to put frames on that do not have comb on them. Since it is a totally new hive I do not have a choice.  Should I keep on feeding the bees so they will have the added strength to make more wax?


            Thanks,

            Stephen Epstein

            If you plan on using the honey from the supers for consumption, you should stop feeding. Otherwise your honey is adulterated.
            Mike in LA



          • Pete
            ... Hi Bill If you do find drawn but uncapped queen cells you either have no queen or more likely a failing queen. However, the queen usually leaves with a
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 3, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              > Bill Wrote:

              > IF -- however, I discover that the hive is building
              > queen cells at the bottom -- what course of action
              > should I take?
              >
              > Should I destroy them? All of them? What if I
              > can't find the queen? Should I still destroy
              > them? Or should I just leave them alone and
              > let nature take its course?
              >


              Hi Bill

              If you do find drawn but uncapped queen cells you either have no queen or more likely a failing queen. However, the queen usually leaves with a swarm soon after the bees have capped queen cells, unless it is poor weather.

              Which ever of the above is true, cutting out all the queen cells will just cause the bees to raise more queen cells. This may not be a problem if they are superceeding, but it is more likely that they are swarming and so the trouble then will be that there could be no very young eggs left for them to start raising new queen cells from. This won't stop them trying to raise queen cells though, they are just more likely to raise a dud queen. So, IMHO, it is always better to NOT cut out queen cells; unless you are deliberately creating a queen raising colony to breed with.

              Some people will advise you to find and kill the queen to stop a prime swarm from issuing, which if done before the queen cells are capped can work; although you can still get virgin queens leaving with swarms in some instances when they hatch. Others might advise cutting all but one or two queen cells out, again to prevent swarms, but I don't like doing that as who is to say which is the best queen cell to leave, (the biggest? - sometimes queen cells are empty or contain dead queens!) I think it is much better to let the bees and virgin queens sort themselves out and chose which queen they want or is the strongest. That way you have more chance of ending up with a strong queen that will make it through more than just a couple of nectar flows and reward you with better crops, before swarming again.

              A swarming colony is also a good opportunity to make increase, splitting a hive into three or four nucs, each with their own queen cells; but that is another issue!

              All that said, you will probably find you have a queen (or brood and eggs at least) and no queen cells. Either way do let us know how it goes and good luck



              Peter
              Cambridge UK
            • Bill Bird
              Thank you Alan and Ruary, A followup question? If I indeed find the queen and all is going well -- will I find the presence of queen cells at the bottom of the
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 3, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Thank you Alan and Ruary,

                A followup question?

                If I indeed find the queen and all is going well -- will I find the presence of queen cells at the bottom of the slats?

                And, if I should find them, should they be destroyed?

                Alan -- thank you for the tip about bringing in pollen. I did not know this. Yes, they are bringing it in by the truckload. They have found multiple sources.

                Plus -- my citrus trees are about to bloom for the second time this spring.

                I've also found them going after the flowers on my tomato plants and pepper plants in the yard. This surprised me. It might explain why I have an ABUNDANCE of tomatoes on the vine already, and also might explain why I've been harvesting ripe tomatoes (yes, I said HARVESTING) in May.

                Heirloom tomato production during the month of May in California is not only rare, it's next to impossible. Yet, I'm getting them, one or two at a time.

                If any of you would be so kind to follow up with me on the queen cell question above, I'd appreciate it very much.

                Thanks everyone. This group has been a great help.

                Bill

                --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Ruary Rudd" <ruaryrudd@...> wrote:
                >
                > I'll second that, I look for eggs, if I see them then I know the queen was
                > alive and laying within the last three days.
                >
                > I would be worried if there were multiple eggs per cell
                > Ruary
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com]On
                > Behalf Of axeman axeman
                > Sent: 03 June 2009 01:45
                > To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Checking on My Hive -- some questions
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > If the bees are bringing in pollen most likely the queen is alive and
                > laying.
                > Not spotting the queen does not mean she isn't there.
                > All I look for is a good brood pattern. Makes no difference to me if I see
                > her or not.
                >
                > Alan, Lakeview, NY
                >
              • william kinder
                let them swarm if they are going to. you have survivors. you might be able to catch the swarm, if that is what it is, or it will get away, to hopefully survive
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 3, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  let them swarm if they are going to. you have survivors. you might be able to catch the swarm, if that is what it is, or it will get away, to hopefully survive in the wild.
                   
                  in either case, you increase the "survivor" genome.
                   
                  if they are superceding, it comes to the same thing.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Pete
                  Sent: Wednesday, June 03, 2009 9:10 AM
                  Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Checking on My Hive -- some questions

                  > Bill Wrote:

                  > IF -- however, I discover that the hive is building
                  > queen cells at the bottom -- what course of action
                  > should I take?
                  >
                  > Should I destroy them? All of them? What if I
                  > can't find the queen? Should I still destroy
                  > them? Or should I just leave them alone and
                  > let nature take its course?
                  >

                  Hi Bill

                  If you do find drawn but uncapped queen cells you either have no queen or more likely a failing queen. However, the queen usually leaves with a swarm soon after the bees have capped queen cells, unless it is poor weather.

                  Which ever of the above is true, cutting out all the queen cells will just cause the bees to raise more queen cells. This may not be a problem if they are superceeding, but it is more likely that they are swarming and so the trouble then will be that there could be no very young eggs left for them to start raising new queen cells from. This won't stop them trying to raise queen cells though, they are just more likely to raise a dud queen. So, IMHO, it is always better to NOT cut out queen cells; unless you are deliberately creating a queen raising colony to breed with.

                  Some people will advise you to find and kill the queen to stop a prime swarm from issuing, which if done before the queen cells are capped can work; although you can still get virgin queens leaving with swarms in some instances when they hatch. Others might advise cutting all but one or two queen cells out, again to prevent swarms, but I don't like doing that as who is to say which is the best queen cell to leave, (the biggest? - sometimes queen cells are empty or contain dead queens!) I think it is much better to let the bees and virgin queens sort themselves out and chose which queen they want or is the strongest. That way you have more chance of ending up with a strong queen that will make it through more than just a couple of nectar flows and reward you with better crops, before swarming again.

                  A swarming colony is also a good opportunity to make increase, splitting a hive into three or four nucs, each with their own queen cells; but that is another issue!

                  All that said, you will probably find you have a queen (or brood and eggs at least) and no queen cells. Either way do let us know how it goes and good luck

                  Peter
                  Cambridge UK

                • Peggy Willenberg
                  I would leave everything alone. As others have said, swarming is a natural process. Have you checked to see if they have filled the box? From the sound of
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 3, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I would leave everything alone. As others have said, swarming is a natural
                    process.

                    Have you checked to see if they have filled the box? From the sound of it,
                    you might need to add another box (if you haven't already).

                    Here in MN, my package hive of Carniolans is incredible. Not room in the
                    bottom box for another bee! And so gentle, not one even tried to sting me.
                    All Italians doing well, too.

                    Peggy in MN
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Bill Bird" <billbird2111@...>
                    To: <Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Wednesday, June 03, 2009 11:44 AM
                    Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: Checking on My Hive -- some questions


                    > Thank you Alan and Ruary,
                    >
                    > A followup question?
                    >
                    > If I indeed find the queen and all is going well -- will I find the
                    > presence of queen cells at the bottom of the slats?
                    >
                    > And, if I should find them, should they be destroyed?
                    >
                    > Alan -- thank you for the tip about bringing in pollen. I did not know
                    > this. Yes, they are bringing it in by the truckload. They have found
                    > multiple sources.
                    >
                    > Plus -- my citrus trees are about to bloom for the second time this
                    > spring.
                    >
                    > I've also found them going after the flowers on my tomato plants and
                    > pepper plants in the yard. This surprised me. It might explain why I have
                    > an ABUNDANCE of tomatoes on the vine already, and also might explain why
                    > I've been harvesting ripe tomatoes (yes, I said HARVESTING) in May.
                    >
                    > Heirloom tomato production during the month of May in California is not
                    > only rare, it's next to impossible. Yet, I'm getting them, one or two at a
                    > time.
                    >
                    > If any of you would be so kind to follow up with me on the queen cell
                    > question above, I'd appreciate it very much.
                    >
                    > Thanks everyone. This group has been a great help.
                    >
                    > Bill
                    >
                    > --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Ruary Rudd" <ruaryrudd@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> I'll second that, I look for eggs, if I see them then I know the queen
                    >> was
                    >> alive and laying within the last three days.
                    >>
                    >> I would be worried if there were multiple eggs per cell
                    >> Ruary
                    >> -----Original Message-----
                    >> From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com]On
                    >> Behalf Of axeman axeman
                    >> Sent: 03 June 2009 01:45
                    >> To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                    >> Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Checking on My Hive -- some questions
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> If the bees are bringing in pollen most likely the queen is alive and
                    >> laying.
                    >> Not spotting the queen does not mean she isn't there.
                    >> All I look for is a good brood pattern. Makes no difference to me if I
                    >> see
                    >> her or not.
                    >>
                    >> Alan, Lakeview, NY
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.