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Re: paint

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  • David O.
    Mineral oil or paraffin is probably fine in California, Arizona, and other warm, sunny areas. I have never seen these in Western Washington, and I do not think
    Message 1 of 29 , Jan 14 5:48 AM
      Mineral oil or paraffin is probably fine in California, Arizona, and
      other warm, sunny areas. I have never seen these in Western Washington,
      and I do not think they would do well in our wet climate. I am not sure
      of the OP's location. Paint is good in all locations. However, as
      another mentioned, dark paint will absorb more heat. More heat is fine
      in most areas, but I would use a light color in areas that consistently
      see temperatures over 100F.

      Gloss, semi-gloss, or flat is unimportant. Of course, your hives are
      outside, so you should use an exterior paint. Apply a primer to the
      bare wood for best results.

      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, OOWONBS@... wrote:
      >
      > >Posted by: "roger"
      > I'm just getting started and building hives for spring. Do you paint
      > hives w/gloss or flat latex. I'm building 3 hives
      >
      > Some folks, esp Warre' hive users, may just lightly char the exterior
      > of the body,
      > and pass the flame lightly over the inside to disinfect it a bit.
      Some
      > use mineral
      > oil over hive exteriors. Some, a warmed wax, painted on.
      >
      > BillSF9c
      >
    • joshua2br
      What are the dissadvantages of not painting at all? I ve all ready got my bees in one super.
      Message 2 of 29 , Apr 29, 2009
        What are the dissadvantages of not painting at all? I've all ready got my bees in one super.
      • Roni
        Josh, Your going to need more than one super anyway. I would order two more supers, build and paint them and then transfer the frames from the other hive into
        Message 3 of 29 , May 2, 2009
          Josh,
          Your going to need more than one super anyway.  I would order two more supers, build and paint them and then transfer the frames from the other hive into the painted hives after they've had a couple of days to dry off and get rid of the paint fumes.
          Then you can paint your original hive body and keep it on hand to catch swarms, increase brood size, splits, or even use as a large honey super, over your two brood boxes.
          Don't forget frames and foundation for your two new boxes.
          Roni
        • Mike S
          ... Josh, Your going to need more than one super anyway.  I would order two more supers, build and paint them and then transfer the frames from the other hive
          Message 4 of 29 , May 3, 2009


            --- On Sat, 5/2/09, Roni <murphy05@...> wrote:

            Josh,
            Your going to need more than one super anyway.  I would order two more supers, build and paint them and then transfer the frames from the other hive into the painted hives after they've had a couple of days to dry off and get rid of the paint fumes.
            Then you can paint your original hive body and keep it on hand to catch swarms, increase brood size, splits, or even use as a large honey super, over your two brood boxes.
            Don't forget frames and foundation for your two new boxes.
            Roni

          • joshua2br
            We are now in 2 supers. We did just order 3 more supers. The ones we are using are Cypress not Pine. In books I see them painted and Not painted. I figured
            Message 5 of 29 , May 4, 2009
              We are now in 2 supers. We did just order 3 more supers. The ones we are using are Cypress not Pine. In books I see them painted and Not painted. I figured the pine should be painted and the Cypress not so important.
            • medallo08
              Message 6 of 29 , May 6, 2009
                --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:
                >
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                > --- On Sat, 5/2/09, Roni <murphy05@...> wrote:
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                > Josh,
                > Your going to need more than one
                > super anyway.  I would order two more supers, build and paint them and then
                > transfer the frames from the other hive into the painted hives after they've had
                > a couple of days to dry off and get rid of the paint fumes.
                > Then you can paint your original
                > hive body and keep it on hand to catch swarms, increase brood size, splits, or
                > even use as a large honey super, over your two brood boxes.
                > Don't forget frames and foundation
                > for your two new boxes.
                > Roni
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Use latex paint and on a good day you can paint the hives where they stand with the bees in them.  Just make sure that after painting and the paint dries a couple of hours to go back and use a razor knife to cut the paint film at the edges where the hive parts meet.  You'll find not many bees will be stuck to the paint job.  Only think, you can't paint the landing board.
                >
                > Mike in LA
                >
              • medallo08
                ... I have a big swarm of bees in my backyard. I would like to move the colony instead of fumigate it. Is this possible?
                Message 7 of 29 , May 6, 2009
                  --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Mike S <mws1112004@...> wrote:
                  >
                  I have a big swarm of bees in my backyard. I would like to move the colony instead of fumigate it. Is this possible?

                  >
                  >
                  > --- On Sat, 5/2/09, Roni <murphy05@...> wrote:
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                  > Josh,
                  > Your going to need more than one
                  > super anyway.  I would order two more supers, build and paint them and then
                  > transfer the frames from the other hive into the painted hives after they've had
                  > a couple of days to dry off and get rid of the paint fumes.
                  > Then you can paint your original
                  > hive body and keep it on hand to catch swarms, increase brood size, splits, or
                  > even use as a large honey super, over your two brood boxes.
                  > Don't forget frames and foundation
                  > for your two new boxes.
                  > Roni
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Use latex paint and on a good day you can paint the hives where they stand with the bees in them.  Just make sure that after painting and the paint dries a couple of hours to go back and use a razor knife to cut the paint film at the edges where the hive parts meet.  You'll find not many bees will be stuck to the paint job.  Only think, you can't paint the landing board.
                  >
                  > Mike in LA
                  >
                • Mark Bolding
                  Yes, you have 2 options, 1 either catch the swarm in a nuc box and relocate or 2 you can just wait the swarm may move off on its own ... From: medallo08
                  Message 8 of 29 , May 7, 2009
                    Yes, you have 2 options, 1 either catch the swarm in a nuc box and relocate or 2 you can just wait the swarm may move off on its own

                    --- On Thu, 5/7/09, medallo08 <medallo08@...> wrote:

                    From: medallo08 <medallo08@...>
                    Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: help
                    To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Thursday, May 7, 2009, 12:38 AM

                    --- In Beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com, Mike S <mws1112004@ ...> wrote:
                    >
                    I have a big swarm of bees in my backyard. I would like to move the colony instead of fumigate it. Is this possible?

                    >
                    >
                    > --- On Sat, 5/2/09, Roni <murphy05@.. .> wrote:
                    >
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                    > Josh,
                    > Your going to need more than one
                    > super anyway.  I would order two more supers, build and paint them and then
                    > transfer the frames from the other hive into the painted hives after they've had
                    > a couple of days to dry off and get rid of the paint fumes.
                    > Then you can paint your original
                    > hive body and keep it on hand to catch swarms, increase brood size, splits, or
                    > even use as a large honey super, over your two brood boxes.
                    > Don't forget frames and foundation
                    > for your two new boxes.
                    > Roni
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Use latex paint and on a good day you can paint the hives where they stand with the bees in them.  Just make sure that after painting and the paint dries a couple of hours to go back and use a razor knife to cut the paint film at the edges where the hive parts meet.  You'll find not many bees will be stuck to the paint job.  Only think, you can't paint the landing board.
                    >
                    > Mike in LA
                    >


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