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best location for an observation hive

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  • Kate Friedman
    Hi everyone, I joined this list several months ago and so far have just been reading all the interesting posts. I am with Lichterman Nature Center in Memphis
    Message 1 of 8 , May 30, 2003
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      Hi everyone,
      I joined this list several months ago and so far have just been reading
      all the interesting posts. I am with Lichterman Nature Center in Memphis
      TN and we are planning a new exhibit on Backyard Wildlife. We would like
      to include an observation hive in the exhibit and plan to call on the
      services of a local beekeeper to help. However, I have not contacted one
      yet and now I need a couple of questions answered quickly.

      I know an observation hive needs to be protected from the sun. However,
      every observation hive I have ever seen was always located indoors. Is
      there a problem with having an observation hive outside as long as it is
      protected from the sunlight? In Memphis the temperature goes up to the
      low to mid 90's (F) for most of the summer. In the winter it is usually
      in the 30s and 40s but may go down into the 20s or teens for a couple of
      weeks.

      Also, we are hoping to open this exhibit in late April 2004 (assuming it
      goes off on time). Over the winter we will install the hive and get
      everything ready. It seems from reading the posts that hives are started
      when the bees begin to swarm. Will we be able to add bees to the hive in
      late March or early April in this part of the country, so that it is
      ready when we open?

      Thanks for any suggestions.
      --
      Kate Friedman
      Lichterman Nature Center
      5992 Quince Road
      Memphis, TN 38119
      (901) 767-7322 x 119
      kate@...
    • Richard Bruno
      The problem with keeping the observation outside is the same you might have experienced with a car sitting in the sun. The glass lets the radiation through
      Message 2 of 8 , May 30, 2003
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        The problem with keeping the observation outside is the same you might have experienced with a car sitting in the sun.   The glass lets the radiation through and traps the heat making the internal temperature soar.
         
        On the other extreme is the winter where the glass or plastic is a lousy insulator and lets all of the heat out.
         
        As far as the summer I would definitely keep it out of the sun so as to not risk the temp going too high and plenty of ventilation.
         
        In the winter I would make arrangements to bring the hive indoors.  Even with insulation I think the cluster would have a difficult time maintaining the 96 F temp for the queen or thereabouts because they physically can't for a "ball" around the queen.
         
        Rich Bruno
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, May 30, 2003 8:16 AM
        Subject: [beekeeping] best location for an observation hive

        Hi everyone,
        I joined this list several months ago and so far have just been reading
        all the interesting posts. I am with Lichterman Nature Center in Memphis
        TN and we are planning a new exhibit on Backyard Wildlife. We would like
        to include an observation hive in the exhibit and plan to call on the
        services of a local beekeeper to help. However, I have not contacted one
        yet and now I need a couple of questions answered quickly.

        I know an observation hive needs to be protected from the sun. However,
        every observation hive I have ever seen was always located indoors. Is
        there a problem with having an observation hive outside as long as it is
        protected from the sunlight? In Memphis the temperature goes up to the
        low to mid 90's (F) for most of the summer. In the winter it is usually
        in the 30s and 40s but may go down into the 20s or teens for a couple of
        weeks.

        Also, we are hoping to open this exhibit in late April 2004 (assuming it
        goes off on time). Over the winter we will install the hive and get
        everything ready. It seems from reading the posts that hives are started
        when the bees begin to swarm. Will we be able to add bees to the hive in
        late March or early April in this part of the country, so that it is
        ready when we open?

        Thanks for any suggestions.
        --
        Kate Friedman
        Lichterman Nature Center
        5992 Quince Road
        Memphis, TN  38119
        (901) 767-7322 x 119
        kate@...



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      • Tom Nitka
        Kate do you plan on having the observation hive available for viewing all year round? Or would it be just seasonal? Last fall I installed and started to
        Message 3 of 8 , May 30, 2003
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          Kate do you plan on having the observation hive available for viewing all year round? Or would it be just seasonal? Last fall I installed and started to maintain an observation hive at a nature center here in Green Bay, Wi. The observation hive is indoors which allows the bees to loosely cluster in the winter which is nice for the people viewing it and makes it much easier to feed them during the winter months. If you would like more details about it let me know. Tom Nitka.

          Kate Friedman wrote:

           Hi everyone,
          I joined this list several months ago and so far have just been reading
          all the interesting posts. I am with Lichterman Nature Center in Memphis
          TN and we are planning a new exhibit on Backyard Wildlife. We would like
          to include an observation hive in the exhibit and plan to call on the
          services of a local beekeeper to help. However, I have not contacted one
          yet and now I need a couple of questions answered quickly.

          I know an observation hive needs to be protected from the sun. However,
          every observation hive I have ever seen was always located indoors. Is
          there a problem with having an observation hive outside as long as it is
          protected from the sunlight? In Memphis the temperature goes up to the
          low to mid 90's (F) for most of the summer. In the winter it is usually
          in the 30s and 40s but may go down into the 20s or teens for a couple of
          weeks.

          Also, we are hoping to open this exhibit in late April 2004 (assuming it
          goes off on time). Over the winter we will install the hive and get
          everything ready. It seems from reading the posts that hives are started
          when the bees begin to swarm. Will we be able to add bees to the hive in
          late March or early April in this part of the country, so that it is
          ready when we open?

          Thanks for any suggestions.
          --
          Kate Friedman
          Lichterman Nature Center
          5992 Quince Road
          Memphis, TN  38119
          (901) 767-7322 x 119
          kate@...
           


          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

        • Crenn
          You might try contacting the local Ag Department and asking for a local association or beekeeper to help. There are various types of observation hives, so of
          Message 4 of 8 , May 30, 2003
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            You might try contacting the local Ag Department and asking for a local association or beekeeper to help.  There are various types of observation hives, so of course, as always with bees, stuff varies.  You might be able to have the hive inside and just have an entrance that goes outside through a window.
             
            Caitlin

            Kate Friedman <Kate@...> wrote:
            Hi everyone,
            I joined this list several months ago and so far have just been reading
            all the interesting posts. I am with Lichterman Nature Center in Memphis
            TN and we are planning a new exhibit on Backyard Wildlife. We would like
            to include an observation hive in the exhibit and plan to call on the
            services of a local beekeeper to help. However, I have not contacted one
            yet and now I need a couple of questions answered quickly.

            I know an observation hive needs to be protected from the sun. However,
            every observation hive I have ever seen was always located indoors. Is
            there a problem with having an observation hive outside as long as it is
            protected from the sunlight? In Memphis the temperature goes up to the
            low to mid 90's (F) for most of the summer. In the winter it is usually
            in the 30s and 40s but may go down into the 20s or teens for a couple of
            weeks.

            Also, we are hoping to open this exhibit in late April 2004 (assuming it
            goes off on time). Over the winter we will install the hive and get
            everything ready. It seems from reading the posts that hives are started
            when the bees begin to swarm. Will we be able to add bees to the hive in
            late March or early April in this part of the country, so that it is
            ready when we open?

            Thanks for any suggestions.
            --
            Kate Friedman
            Lichterman Nature Center
            5992 Quince Road
            Memphis, TN 38119
            (901) 767-7322 x 119
            kate@...


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          • Dave Cushman
            Hi Kate & All ... One of the problems that an observation hive has is it s shape, which generally has a great deal of surface area when compared to the actual
            Message 5 of 8 , May 31, 2003
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              Hi Kate & All

              > I know an observation hive needs to be protected from the sun. However,
              > every observation hive I have ever seen was always located indoors. Is
              > there a problem with having an observation hive outside as long as it is
              > protected from the sunlight? In Memphis the temperature goes up to the
              > low to mid 90's (F) for most of the summer. In the winter it is usually
              > in the 30s and 40s but may go down into the 20s or teens for a couple of
              > weeks.

              One of the problems that an observation hive has is it's shape, which
              generally has a great deal of surface area when compared to the actual
              volume. Thus the bees have a hard time regulating temperature. A part of a
              building that never receives direct sunlight is ideal and the temperature in
              buildings is more stable than that 'out of doors'.

              Have a look at the website of a friend of mine...
              http://homepage.ntlworld.com/gandboss/
              He has an observation hive in his living room and has had for several years.


              Regards & 73s... Dave Cushman, G8MZY
              Beekeeping & Bee Breeding Website
              http://website.lineone.net/~dave.cushman
            • Gary Plazyk
              Hi, Kate! You might like to pick up a copy of _Observation Hives - How To Set Up, Maintain, And Use A Window To The World Of Honey Bees_ by Thomas Webster and
              Message 6 of 8 , May 31, 2003
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                Hi, Kate!

                You might like to pick up a copy of _Observation Hives - How To Set
                Up, Maintain, And Use A Window To The World Of Honey Bees_ by Thomas
                Webster and Dewey Caron, ISBN 0-936028-12-2, 1999, published by The
                A.I. Root Company, Medina, OH USA.

                The book has basic information on setting up and maintaining various
                types of observation hives, and includes classroom activities and
                exercises that you can do with an observation hive (for example,
                mapping change in brood / honey / pollen / empty cells on the frames
                over time).

                Best regards,
                -Gary P.

                --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Kate Friedman <Kate@s...> wrote:
                > Hi everyone,
                > I joined this list several months ago and so far have just been
                reading all the interesting posts. I am with Lichterman Nature Center
                in Memphis TN and we are planning a new exhibit on Backyard Wildlife.
                We would like to include an observation hive in the exhibit...
                >
                > Thanks for any suggestions.
                > --
                > Kate Friedman
                > Lichterman Nature Center
                > 5992 Quince Road
                > Memphis, TN 38119
                > (901) 767-7322 x 119
                > kate@s...
              • Marie Kamphefner
                Regards to the list: My cousin from South Missouri has sold me his bee equipment because he is chronically ill. I got all the stuff today. Now I need to buy
                Message 7 of 8 , May 31, 2003
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                  Regards to the list:

                  My cousin from South Missouri has sold me his bee equipment because he
                  is chronically ill. I got all the stuff today. Now I need to buy bees
                  and I think I want Italian bees. Can anyone suggest where I can order
                  the bees and a queen? I am in north central Missouri and I am unaware
                  of anyone nearby who keeps bees.

                  I bought the book, "Beekeeping For Dummies" and have been reading
                  everything I can find about bees. I am excited and a little frightened
                  about doing this, but have been wanting to for a long time. We believe
                  having the bees will increase our yields on our vegetable and small
                  fruit farm, plus we will have honey eventually.

                  Thanks.

                  Marie in Missouri
                • Richard Bruno
                  http://www.hunny.com/orgs/mo/ Try this link for contacts. I m sure if you make a couple calls they could help you out with some local beekeepers. Rich ...
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 31, 2003
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                    Try this link for contacts.
                     
                    I'm sure if you make a couple calls they could help you out with some local beekeepers.
                     
                    Rich
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Saturday, May 31, 2003 11:31 PM
                    Subject: [beekeeping] Newbie needs bees

                    Regards to the list:

                    My cousin from South Missouri has sold me his bee equipment because he
                    is chronically ill.  I got all the stuff today.  Now I need to buy bees
                    and I think I want Italian bees.  Can anyone suggest where I can order
                    the bees and a queen?  I am in north central Missouri and I am unaware
                    of anyone nearby who keeps bees.

                    I bought the book, "Beekeeping For Dummies" and have been reading
                    everything I can find about bees.  I am excited and a little frightened
                    about doing this, but have been wanting to for a long time.  We believe
                    having the bees will increase our yields on our vegetable and small
                    fruit farm, plus we will have honey eventually.

                    Thanks.

                    Marie in Missouri






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