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Re: [Beekeeping] Re: First timer with a question

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  • russell spencer
    Humm I must be doing it all wrong.I just finished making 130  nukes.And  they will be ready for the almonds.double deeps.Do I feed yep annd medicate
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 10, 2008


      Humm I must be doing it all wrong.I just finished making 130  nukes.And  they will be ready for the almonds.double deeps.Do I feed yep annd medicate at the same time.inside feeders.filled twice before going to cal.then 2 more times in cal.along with 1 time for meds.I feed the last time in the almonds because the bees will starve out on almonds alone.BUT am going to do things different next yr.will not make nukes and splits in almonds.even thou I have the big boost of brood .will  bring back to the cold country .place the bees in the snow.shut the queen down.wait till it warms up again.do 750 5 frame nukes in late may grow my own queen cells.and place cells.with the price of queens going the way they are it is the only thing to do.the 750 nukes will be ready for almonds 1340 hives will be making honey.so what will my cost to feed be??????about 1400$$the cost of queens would be.around 17,000 .for 1000 queens.so is it cost effective to start late ???? I just presented my plight you will have to figure your own way.but 4 gals of syrup.a yr ain't much.not in bulk anyway.and thats where I stop growing and just do bees.5 semi loads each yr to cal for almonds and around 2400 doing honey.where i live ea hive will produce about #90 lbs each.

       we all do things on a different scale.some 1-2 hives some more.but we all get the same result if we do it rt.healthy bees.the one thing and first thing I was taught about beekeeping is FEED,FEED, AND FEED somemore.treat the bees rt and they will do you rt.

      Have a great day Russell

      --- On Tue, 6/10/08, William Bates <wjbates1430@...> wrote:

      From: William Bates <wjbates1430@...>
      Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: First timer with a question
      To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, June 10, 2008, 9:11 AM

      He maybe atleast partly correct, in the sense that if they do not build up enough supplies you will have to feed them. But it is a simple thing to do really. Heck here in western Washington most beekeepers (if not all) end up feeding at some point in the year. Especially early spring when the bees get active but not much is in bloom.
       
      William Bates
      Sedro-Woolley, WA

    • The Browns
      Go for it. The worst thing you will have to do is feed them. Feeding in the spring is normal, and feeding later in the season for winter stores is normal. Just
      Message 2 of 20 , Jun 10, 2008
        Go for it. The worst thing you will have to do is feed them. Feeding in the spring is normal, and feeding later in the season for winter stores is normal. Just don't expect to have a surplus of honey to take off. You might have a late honey flow. Now in Georgia you have several bee suppliers. Check, and see if they are selling anymore bees for the season. The only thing is you may have to pick them up as a lot of suppliers will not mail bees during hot weather. The other way is to find someone who is making up nukes, and see if they will sell you one. A possible source might be a pollinator. Good luck.
        JB
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of russell spencer
        Sent: Tuesday, June 10, 2008 8:01 AM
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] First timer with a question

        well let see humm compitition iswhat you represent .get  your bees and go for it.

        --- On Wed, 6/4/08, clmaloy <clmaloy@yahoo. com> wrote:
        From: clmaloy <clmaloy@yahoo. com>
        Subject: [Beekeeping] First timer with a question
        To: Beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com
        Date: Wednesday, June 4, 2008, 5:33 PM

        I've been thinking about getting a hive for a few months. Been reading
        some. Today, when I was at a farmer's market, I struck up a
        conversation with the guy selling honey. He said that in Georgia
        (where we are), if you don't have your new hive(s) in by April 1, you
        can forget it for the rest of the year, or you'd end up having to feed
        them all winter. Has anyone heard of this? My garden isn't even
        blooming yet, and there are some flowers that bloom all summer long.
        I'd hate to think my window of opportunity is already closed...


      • Marco Polo
        Linda, Polystyrene is light weight and holds in the heat in summer and retains it in winter.. but it isnt durable... a few seasons and it breaks up... a chip
        Message 3 of 20 , Jun 11, 2008
          Linda,
          Polystyrene is light weight and holds in the heat in summer and retains it in winter.. but it
          isnt durable... a few seasons and it breaks up... a chip here then a crack there then a section
          snaps off untill your replacing it in a few years.... a wood hive will last you 20+ years if
          maintained.

          forgo the new polstyrene,,, go with tried and true wood..

          Mark in Va
        • Linda Elmenhorst
          Thanks! I will buy wood. Linda Marco Polo wrote: Linda, Polystyrene is light weight and holds in the heat in summer and retains
          Message 4 of 20 , Jun 11, 2008
            Thanks! I will buy wood. Linda

            Marco Polo <marco5819@...> wrote:
            Linda,
            Polystyrene is light weight and holds in the heat in summer and retains it in winter.. but it
            isnt durable... a few seasons and it breaks up... a chip here then a crack there then a section
            snaps off untill your replacing it in a few years.... a wood hive will last you 20+ years if
            maintained.

            forgo the new polstyrene,, , go with tried and true wood..

            Mark in Va




            Warm Regards
            Linda
          • russell spencer
            I agree with the wood.One of the ole beekeepers i bought out stamped his  hives as to year built I have a few built in 1935.that are as good as the ones I
            Message 5 of 20 , Jun 11, 2008

              I agree with the wood.One of the ole beekeepers i bought out stamped his  hives as to year built I have a few built in 1935.that are as good as the ones I just purchased.no they are better because they have healthy bees in them.

                Lil hint Folks.If You growing beekeepers are wanting to expand.and can get together among yourselves and place a order.The only place to buy your wooden wear is browning cut stock.near lewiston Idaho.Beutiful place to visit and take a vacation.

              I just picked up 1000 hive bodies at $5 each and 1000 supers @ 4$ each. It takes awhile to get a big order out like 3 months cause it's a mom and pop place.So get together find out what you all need and place your order as a group.500 is the discount price limit.they make frames and nukes also.

                I know that I cannot even buy the wood for what I am paying .Just a hint.

                You folks are the ones to do it Us "ole" beekeepers can't even get together on what time to eat dinner

               Have a great day Russell

              --- On Wed, 6/11/08, Linda Elmenhorst <lelmenhorst@...> wrote:

              From: Linda Elmenhorst <lelmenhorst@...>
              Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: First timer with a question
              To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, June 11, 2008, 8:12 AM

              Thanks! I will buy wood. Linda

              Marco Polo <marco5819@yahoo. com> wrote:

              Linda,
              Polystyrene is light weight and holds in the heat in summer and retains it in winter.. but it
              isnt durable... a few seasons and it breaks up... a chip here then a crack there then a section
              snaps off untill your replacing it in a few years.... a wood hive will last you 20+ years if
              maintained.

              forgo the new polstyrene,, , go with tried and true wood..

              Mark in Va




              Warm Regards
              Linda

            • Linda Elmenhorst
              Do they have a website, I live in Oklahoma Idaho is a tad far..... Linda russell spencer wrote: I agree with the
              Message 6 of 20 , Jun 11, 2008
                Do they have a website, I live in Oklahoma Idaho is a tad far..... Linda

                russell spencer <beekeeper121@...> wrote:
                I agree with the wood.One of the ole beekeepers i bought out stamped his  hives as to year built I have a few built in 1935.that are as good as the ones I just purchased.no they are better because they have healthy bees in them.
                  Lil hint Folks.If You growing beekeepers are wanting to expand.and can get together among yourselves and place a order.The only place to buy your wooden wear is browning cut stock.near lewiston Idaho.Beutiful place to visit and take a vacation.
                I just picked up 1000 hive bodies at $5 each and 1000 supers @ 4$ each. It takes awhile to get a big order out like 3 months cause it's a mom and pop place.So get together find out what you all need and place your order as a group.500 is the discount price limit.they make frames and nukes also.
                  I know that I cannot even buy the wood for what I am paying .Just a hint.
                  You folks are the ones to do it Us "ole" beekeepers can't even get together on what time to eat dinner
                 Have a great day Russell

                --- On Wed, 6/11/08, Linda Elmenhorst <lelmenhorst@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:
                From: Linda Elmenhorst <lelmenhorst@ sbcglobal. net>
                Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: First timer with a question
                To: Beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com
                Date: Wednesday, June 11, 2008, 8:12 AM

                Thanks! I will buy wood. Linda

                Marco Polo <marco5819@yahoo. com> wrote:
                Linda,
                Polystyrene is light weight and holds in the heat in summer and retains it in winter.. but it
                isnt durable... a few seasons and it breaks up... a chip here then a crack there then a section
                snaps off untill your replacing it in a few years.... a wood hive will last you 20+ years if
                maintained.

                forgo the new polstyrene,, , go with tried and true wood..

                Mark in Va




                Warm Regards
                Linda




                Warm Regards
                Linda
              • russell spencer
                No web site but rick advertises in the abj.  lots of keepers in ok you should be able to get together with some friends and place a order.lots of keepers
                Message 7 of 20 , Jun 11, 2008

                  No web site but rick advertises in the abj.

                   lots of keepers in ok you should be able to get together with some friends and place a order.lots of keepers come to texas to winter bees from minisota check around you will be surprised at how many there really are.Well I am off to check my traps for swarms.my new breeder stock is from these wild bees.and they are doing great.supers are on nukes are made nector is flowing.waht more is there to do but enjoy the bees

                  --- On Wed, 6/11/08, Linda Elmenhorst <lelmenhorst@...> wrote:

                  From: Linda Elmenhorst <lelmenhorst@...>
                  Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: First timer with a question
                  To: Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Wednesday, June 11, 2008, 8:37 AM

                  Do they have a website, I live in Oklahoma Idaho is a tad far..... Linda

                  russell spencer <beekeeper121@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                  I agree with the wood.One of the ole beekeepers i bought out stamped his  hives as to year built I have a few built in 1935.that are as good as the ones I just purchased.no they are better because they have healthy bees in them.
                    Lil hint Folks.If You growing beekeepers are wanting to expand.and can get together among yourselves and place a order.The only place to buy your wooden wear is browning cut stock.near lewiston Idaho.Beutiful place to visit and take a vacation.
                  I just picked up 1000 hive bodies at $5 each and 1000 supers @ 4$ each. It takes awhile to get a big order out like 3 months cause it's a mom and pop place.So get together find out what you all need and place your order as a group.500 is the discount price limit.they make frames and nukes also.
                    I know that I cannot even buy the wood for what I am paying .Just a hint.
                    You folks are the ones to do it Us "ole" beekeepers can't even get together on what time to eat dinner
                   Have a great day Russell

                  --- On Wed, 6/11/08, Linda Elmenhorst <lelmenhorst@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:
                  From: Linda Elmenhorst <lelmenhorst@ sbcglobal. net>
                  Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: First timer with a question
                  To: Beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com
                  Date: Wednesday, June 11, 2008, 8:12 AM

                  Thanks! I will buy wood. Linda

                  Marco Polo <marco5819@yahoo. com> wrote:
                  Linda,
                  Polystyrene is light weight and holds in the heat in summer and retains it in winter.. but it
                  isnt durable... a few seasons and it breaks up... a chip here then a crack there then a section
                  snaps off untill your replacing it in a few years.... a wood hive will last you 20+ years if
                  maintained.

                  forgo the new polstyrene,, , go with tried and true wood..

                  Mark in Va




                  Warm Regards
                  Linda




                  Warm Regards
                  Linda

                • Todd Warner
                  On Wed, Jun 4, 2008 at 9:47 PM, Linda Elmenhorst ... To all new beekeepers, I steer them towards standard equipment. In this case wood . Once you know what
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jun 12, 2008
                    On Wed, Jun 4, 2008 at 9:47 PM, Linda Elmenhorst
                    <lelmenhorst@...> wrote:
                    > I am in the process of gathering equipment and I noticed the polystyrene
                    > hives. What do you experienced beekeepers think of the polystyrene hives. I
                    > noticed they are much lighter in weight which would make lifting them when
                    > they are full much easier. Opinons? Linda

                    To all new beekeepers, I steer them towards "standard" equipment. In
                    this case "wood". Once you know what you are doing, then start
                    experimenting. This eliminate a lot of "unknowns" your first year and
                    your mentors will be better able to help you. Now... if everyone in
                    your area is running polystyrene, then ...sure, but I suspect that
                    would not be the case.

                    -todd

                    --
                    The Carolina Bee Company
                    http://www.carolinabees.com/
                  • Todd Warner
                    ... The window isn t closed. Especially in GA (long summer). Get a nuc and you will have better success. You may have to feed, but there is still plenty of
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jun 12, 2008
                      On Wed, Jun 4, 2008 at 7:33 PM, clmaloy <clmaloy@...> wrote:
                      > I've been thinking about getting a hive for a few months. Been reading
                      > some. Today, when I was at a farmer's market, I struck up a
                      > conversation with the guy selling honey. He said that in Georgia
                      > (where we are), if you don't have your new hive(s) in by April 1, you
                      > can forget it for the rest of the year, or you'd end up having to feed
                      > them all winter. Has anyone heard of this? My garden isn't even
                      > blooming yet, and there are some flowers that bloom all summer long.
                      > I'd hate to think my window of opportunity is already closed...

                      The window isn't closed. Especially in GA (long summer). Get a nuc and
                      you will have better success. You may have to feed, but there is still
                      plenty of time left before the golden-rod and aster flows. Those bees
                      may very well produce enough to get through the winter without
                      feeding.

                      Go for it; get a mentor; and welcome to beekeeping.

                      -todd

                      --
                      The Carolina Bee Company
                      http://www.carolinabees.com/
                    • axeman axeman
                      Here s my problem, and solution. It costs me more in shipping and handling than the actual items I purchase. A body that costs 9 dollars cost 11 dollars
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jun 12, 2008

                        Here's my problem, and solution.

                        It costs me more in shipping and handling than the actual items I purchase. A body that costs 9 dollars cost 11 dollars extra in shipping/handling. Insane. I went out to Sears and bought a dado blade for my table saw and learned to make my own boxes. So now when my bees swarm and I hive them I can just go out to the garage and in 1 hour make a new box. A day later it's painted and ready to go. I can't do that with polystyrene. Granted, I still have to buy foundation, but at least I was able to reduce much of my cost from DIY. Now, to learn to cut frames.....I have the plans, just need the time to learn....

                         

                        Alan, Lakeview, NY

                         

                        P.S.

                        Russell, If I ever make it out west I'm going to look you up. I would love to see an operation like yours in the works.





                        To all new beekeepers, I steer them towards "standard" equipment. In
                        this case "wood". Once you know what you are doing, then start
                        experimenting. This eliminate a lot of "unknowns" your first year and
                        your mentors will be better able to help you. Now... if everyone in
                        your area is running polystyrene, then ...sure, but I suspect that
                        would not be the case.

                        -todd

                        --
                        The Carolina Bee Company
                        http://www.carolina bees.com/


                      • pgmrdan
                        To avoid shipping I drove to my nearest Dadant branch. It still cost a lot for gas but not as much as shipping would. My next step is to make my own stuff.
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jun 13, 2008
                          To avoid shipping I drove to my nearest Dadant branch. It still
                          cost a lot for gas but not as much as shipping would.

                          My next step is to make my own stuff.

                          I'd like to make one really nice hive with a peaked roof, stain it,
                          and polyurethane the heck out of it. Then I'd set it up in the
                          center of my vegetables and flowers garden. It could be a real show
                          piece.

                          --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, axeman axeman <axeman_002000@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > Here's my problem, and solution.
                          > It costs me more in shipping and handling than the actual items I
                          purchase. A body that costs 9 dollars cost 11 dollars extra in
                          shipping/handling. Insane. I went out to Sears and bought a dado
                          blade for my table saw and learned to make my own boxes. So now when
                          my bees swarm and I hive them I can just go out to the garage and in
                          1 hour make a new box. A day later it's painted and ready to go. I
                          can't do that with polystyrene. Granted, I still have to buy
                          foundation, but at least I was able to reduce much of my cost from
                          DIY. Now, to learn to cut frames.....I have the plans, just need the
                          time to learn....
                          >  
                          > Alan, Lakeview, NY
                          >  
                          > P.S.
                          > Russell, If I ever make it out west I'm going to look you up. I
                          would love to see an operation like yours in the works.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > To all new beekeepers, I steer them towards "standard" equipment.
                          In
                          > this case "wood". Once you know what you are doing, then start
                          > experimenting. This eliminate a lot of "unknowns" your first year
                          and
                          > your mentors will be better able to help you. Now... if everyone in
                          > your area is running polystyrene, then ...sure, but I suspect that
                          > would not be the case.
                          >
                          > -todd
                          >
                          > --
                          > The Carolina Bee Company
                          > http://www.carolina bees.com/
                          >
                        • axeman axeman
                          Sounds Awesome! I have my hive in my backyard painted like the gatehouse of a castle, with a raised garden bed behind it and 4 towers all painted grey with the
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jun 13, 2008

                            Sounds Awesome!

                            I have my hive in my backyard painted like the gatehouse of a castle, with a raised garden bed behind it and 4 towers all painted grey with the black striped brick work.

                             

                            Alan, Lakeview, NY

                            --- On Fri, 6/13/08, pgmrdan <pgmrdan@...> wrote:


                            To avoid shipping I drove to my nearest Dadant branch. It still
                            cost a lot for gas but not as much as shipping would.

                            My next step is to make my own stuff.

                            I'd like to make one really nice hive with a peaked roof, stain it,
                            and polyurethane the heck out of it. Then I'd set it up in the
                            center of my vegetables and flowers garden. It could be a real show
                            piece.


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