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Re: Wild bees

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  • sgtwal@aol.com
    Our ferals get smaller and darker the longer they are free of man. I place swarm traps down wind of the main hive and as high as convenient. I try for 2 to 3
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 15, 2008
       Our ferals get smaller and darker the longer they are free of man. I place swarm traps down wind of the main hive and as high as convenient. I try for 2 to 3 meters, about 8 to 12 feet in height, south or east facing and in or against some structure like a tree or building. They like about 300 to 900 meters between them and the home nest, but will move in to a really nice cavity closer if offered.
        The scouts for the swarm tend to draw for obvious objects first.  I use a standard size deep body with starter strips and swarm lure. I have been known to include some comb if handy but often as not do not.
        As you know the location a trap circle might pay of. A trap in each direction to alow for the mind on the day of the swarm.




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    • russell spencer
      thanks thats good advice i will use it sgtwal@aol.com wrote: Our ferals get smaller and darker the longer they are free of man. I place swarm traps down wind
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 15, 2008
        thanks thats good advice i will use it


        sgtwal@... wrote:
         Our ferals get smaller and darker the longer they are free of man. I place swarm traps down wind of the main hive and as high as convenient. I try for 2 to 3 meters, about 8 to 12 feet in height, south or east facing and in or against some structure like a tree or building. They like about 300 to 900 meters between them and the home nest, but will move in to a really nice cavity closer if offered.
          The scouts for the swarm tend to draw for obvious objects first.  I use a standard size deep body with starter strips and swarm lure. I have been known to include some comb if handy but often as not do not.
          As you know the location a trap circle might pay of. A trap in each direction to alow for the mind on the day of the swarm.




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      • Ruary Rudd
        Could that be because of AHB in the area? This could explain resistance to varroa. Ruary ... Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: Wild bees sgtwal@aol.com wrote: Our
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 16, 2008
          Could that be because of AHB in the area?
          This could explain resistance to varroa.
          Ruary
          -----Original Message-----
          Subject: Re: [Beekeeping] Re: Wild bees
          sgtwal@... wrote:
           Our ferals get smaller and darker the longer they are free of man. I

        • sgtwal@aol.com
          I live in Indiana and the African Bee isn t a problem here yet. Based on what I ve seen and read our ferals resemble the Apis Mellifera Mellifera or German
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 16, 2008
              I live in Indiana and the African Bee isn't a problem here yet. Based on what I've seen and read our ferals resemble the Apis Mellifera Mellifera or German Honey Bee.
              A study done in the South East US showed that the genes for AMM were more common among ferals than among domestic stock. Since these haven't been imported since the mid 1800's their genetic presence among ferals in such strength may indicate that their genes are a factor in successful survival of feral bees in the US.
              They stopped importing them, I'm told, because of their small size and "touchy" temperment.




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          • russell spencer
            I live in wyoming and work in new mexico.the bees I found live above the 5000 elevation.where there is lots of snow. I am no expert by any means but from
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 16, 2008
              I live in wyoming and work in new mexico.the bees I found live above the 5000 elevation.where  there is lots of snow.
              I am no expert by any means but from articals I have read about aficanized bees they have a hard time in cold country.because they don't ball .for this reason and several others.I do not believe these bees are africanized.
               Also I crawled into a couple of the hive cavities.to look at them.they seemed gental.excet for the light i was shinning on them they didn't bother me.It was amazing the comb was atleast 7 ft long and in rows about 3 ft wide.I did not disturb it much except to cut off a small piece and check out the size of comb and the honey.lots of honey in hive.

              sgtwal@... wrote:
                I live in Indiana and the African Bee isn't a problem here yet. Based on what I've seen and read our ferals resemble the Apis Mellifera Mellifera or German Honey Bee.
                A study done in the South East US showed that the genes for AMM were more common among ferals than among domestic stock. Since these haven't been imported since the mid 1800's their genetic presence among ferals in such strength may indicate that their genes are a factor in successful survival of feral bees in the US.
                They stopped importing them, I'm told, because of their small size and "touchy" temperment.




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            • Pete
              ... If you have access to a slide scanner with a 2400 resolution, there is a software programe called Draw Wing and an excel spredsheet called Morphplot you
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 16, 2008
                > ....Based on
                > what I've seen and read our ferals resemble
                > the Apis Mellifera Mellifera or
                > German Honey Bee.


                If you have access to a slide scanner with a 2400 resolution, there
                is a software programe called Draw Wing and an excel spredsheet
                called Morphplot you can paste the Draw Wing results into which will
                analyse wings and confirm if the bees are AMM.

                The software can be found on Dave Cushman's website here....

                http://www.dave-cushman.net/computing/downloads.html


                Best regards

                Peter
                Cambridge UK
              • William
                So anyone ever had bees move in on there own to an empty hive? Had one I had cleaned out after it did not requeen last fall and was going to get a new batch
                Message 7 of 8 , May 29 8:16 PM
                  So anyone ever had bees move in on there own to an empty hive? Had one I had cleaned out after it did not requeen last fall and was going to get a new batch for it. but when I checked it there is a small group of bees living in it.
                • Pete
                  ... Hi William Yup, this happens regularly. I ve had two swarms from my own hives move into bait nucs at my apiaries this year (I started the year with 18
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 1, 2009
                    --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "William" <wjbates1430@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > So anyone ever had bees move in on there own to an empty
                    > hive? Had one I had cleaned out after it did not requeen
                    > last fall and was going to get a new batch for it. but when
                    > I checked it there is a small group of bees living in it.
                    >


                    Hi William


                    Yup, this happens regularly. I've had two swarms from my own hives move into bait nucs at my apiaries this year (I started the year with 18 hives at two apiaries) and I've also had a swarm from somewhere move into a bait hive at home (Mrs. wont have bees in our garden, but each year we get swarms move into a bait hive or two and I get to play at home for a few weeks before she decides that have to go)

                    I also have another 10 bail nucs spread about local villages on the roofs of friends garages/sheds. So far two of these have had swarms turn up. Free bees...excellent!


                    Peter
                    Cambridge UK
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