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RE: [Beekeeping] Cleaning Wax

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  • Mike Stoops
    Beeswax melts at 144º to 147º F. The flash point (point where it starts burning) is 400º F. Using a non flammable source, i.e. hot water bath, heat the
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 6, 2007
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      Beeswax melts at 144º to 147º F.  The flash point (point where it starts burning) is 400º F.  Using a non flammable source, i.e. hot water bath, heat the wax up about 20º to 30º higher than its melting point and then pour through material that has about the same weave density as the sheets on your bed.  Higher quality straining means more expensive sheets.

      I have never heard of mold growing on beeswax.  If that happens you have material other than beeswax included in the pour.  As others have suggested, melt your beeswax in with water so that the water dissolves out foreign material.   Be very careful when working with melted beeswax.  Doesn't take too much to ignite it if you have an open flame.  It's very difficult to extinguish if it starts burning on top of your stove or whatever.  If you have a large fire extinguisher, it's a very good idea to have it available in a place that would not be engulfed in flames if a fire starts.

      SAFETY FIRST always.

      Mike in LA


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    • Mike
      Yeah. What Mike in LA said. I d go a bit further and recommend strongly against doing any heating over an open flame. My recommendation is to use an electric
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 6, 2007
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        Yeah.  What Mike in LA said. 

        I'd go a bit further and recommend strongly against doing any heating over an open flame.  My recommendation is to use an electric hot plate or, if necessary, over an electric stove. 

        Mike in WA

        On Dec 6, 2007 6:01 AM, Mike Stoops <mws1112004@...> wrote:

        Beeswax melts at 144º to 147º F.  The flash point (point where it starts burning) is 400º F.  Using a non flammable source, i.e. hot water bath, heat the wax up about 20º to 30º higher than its melting point and then pour through material that has about the same weave density as the sheets on your bed.  Higher quality straining means more expensive sheets.

        I have never heard of mold growing on beeswax.  If that happens you have material other than beeswax included in the pour.  As others have suggested, melt your beeswax in with water so that the water dissolves out foreign material.   Be very careful when working with melted beeswax.  Doesn't take too much to ignite it if you have an open flame.  It's very difficult to extinguish if it starts burning on top of your stove or whatever.  If you have a large fire extinguisher, it's a very good idea to have it available in a place that would not be engulfed in flames if a fire starts.

        SAFETY FIRST always.

        Mike in LA


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      • Mike Stoops
        Mike wrote: Some folks use a solar wax melter to keep the wax/honey hot for a longer time which allows the honey to float on
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 7, 2007
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          Mike  wrote:
          Some folks use a solar wax melter to keep the wax/honey hot for a longer time which allows the honey to float on top. 


          Melted wax will float above honey, same as water.

          Mike in LA


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        • Mike
          Of course. I got that backward. Must have had a Duhhh moment. Sorry about the confusion. Mike in WA
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 7, 2007
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            Of course.  I got that backward.  Must have had a "Duhhh" moment.  Sorry about the confusion.

            Mike in WA

            On Dec 7, 2007 4:37 AM, Mike Stoops < mws1112004@...> wrote:

            Mike  wrote:

            Some folks use a solar wax melter to keep the wax/honey hot for a longer time which allows the honey to float on top. 


            Melted wax will float above honey, same as water.

            Mike in LA


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