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Could Honey, an Ancient Remedy, Make a Comeback in Contemporary Wound Care?

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  • hivehealth
    Could Honey, an Ancient Remedy, Make a Comeback in Contemporary Wound Care? By Eric Frederick Trump, The Washington Post, 8/7/2007
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 7, 2007
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      Could Honey, an Ancient Remedy, Make a Comeback in Contemporary Wound Care?

      By Eric Frederick Trump, The Washington Post, 8/7/2007

      http://apitherapy.blogspot.com/2007/08/washington-post-article-looks-at-use-of.html

       

      …Manuka has also attracted attention because, in an era when the efficacy of pharmaceutical antibiotics is under threat, it has shown some promise in the treatment of wounds infected with especially challenging bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the superbug whose incidence increased 32-fold in U.S. hospitals between 1976 and 2003, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

       

      Manuka dressings have been in use for some time in Great Britain and Australia as well as in New Zealand; earlier this year they were cleared for use as an antimicrobial dressing in Canada; and last month the Food and Drug Administration cleared them for use in wound and burn care -- though not as an antimicrobial drug -- making them the first honey-based products cleared for medical use in the United States…

    • Ron & Eefje
      Hello, I see that you people keep talking about the Manuka honey, but have you realized that the anti-bacterial properties of West Australian Jarrah honey is
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 7, 2007
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        Hello,

        I see that you people keep talking about the Manuka honey, but have you
        realized that the anti-bacterial properties of West Australian Jarrah
        honey is many times higher?
        The Jarrah honey is more scarce, particularly with the die-back disease
        minimizing the number of these coastal Jarrah trees. It does not help
        either that these trees do not flower each year,but the effectiveness of
        this honey should be much higher than the Manuka variant.

        Ron van Mierlo


        hivehealth skrev:
        >
        > Could Honey, an Ancient Remedy, Make a Comeback in Contemporary Wound
        > Care?
        >
        > By Eric Frederick Trump, The Washington Post, 8/7/2007
        >
        > http://apitherapy.blogspot.com/2007/08/washington-post-article-looks-at-use-of.html
        >
        > …Manuka has also attracted attention because, in an era when the
        > efficacy of pharmaceutical antibiotics is under threat, it has shown
        > some promise in the treatment of wounds infected with especially
        > challenging bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant staphylococcus
        > aureus (MRSA), the superbug whose incidence increased 32-fold in U.S.
        > hospitals between 1976 and 2003, according to the Centers for Disease
        > Control and Prevention.
        >
        > Manuka dressings have been in use for some time in Great Britain and
        > Australia as well as in New Zealand; earlier this year they were
        > cleared for use as an antimicrobial dressing in Canada; and last month
        > the Food and Drug Administration cleared them for use in wound and
        > burn care -- though not as an antimicrobial drug -- making them the
        > first honey-based products cleared for medical use in the United States…
        >
        > _
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