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2634Re: [beekeeping] forage planting

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  • Guro Dennis Servaes
    Aug 20 3:12 AM
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      Dec

      Red River Gum

      Eucalyptus camaldensis

      100 ft. N

      Jan - Mar

      Sidney Blue Gum

      Eucalyptus saligna

      150 ft. N&P

      Dec - Apr

      California Bay Laurel

      Umbellularia california

      P

      Palm Tree

      Jan

      Pussy Willow

      Salix discolor

      Early P

      Feb- Mar

      Almonds

      Amygdalus communis

      p

      Blossom Mar

      Silver Maple

      Acer

      N

      Cherries

      Apr- May

      Black Locust

      Robinia pseudo -acacia

      N

      Apr- May

      Apples

      Pyrus malus

      Oranges & other Citrus

      Apr- June

      Sages

      N

      May

      Tulip Poplar

      Liriodendron tulipifera

      200 ft.

      May - June

      Chinese Tallow

      Sapium sebiferum

      N&P     40 ft.

      May - June

      Cigar Tree

      Catalpa sp.

      Nectar

      June-Oct

      Yellow Star Thistle

      Centaurea solstitialis

      Alfalfa

      Sweet Clover

      June-July

      Basswood

      Tilia sp.

      N 130 ft.

      June- July

      Privet

      Ligustrum lucidum

      15 ft.

      June - Aug

      Sweet Clover

      Melilotus spp.

      Aug-Oct

      Mint

      Mentha

      Ants avoid

      Goldenrod

      Aster

      Fall

      Michaelmas Daisy

      Aster

      N&P

      Fall & Winter

      Mahonia

      Mahonia

      N&P

      Winter

      Galanthus

      Galanthus

      N&P

      N= Nectar

      P= Pollen

      The above chart should help with selecting plants to propagate for the bees, a not too profitable idea.  It is best to find areas already thick with what the bees need.  Clean water, sanitary location, nectar, pollen, etc.  Unfortunately those places are the first to be plowed under or set fire each year.

      A thoughtful thing to do is plant invasive  plants like black locust and purple loosestrife where apartments and shopping centers choke out nature anyway.  Think to plant trees that are tall like Eucalyptus, then shorter trees like bay laurel and black locust, lower still the bushes, like pyracantus and below that groundcovers, so that the same dirt sustains several seasons of nectar and pollen.  Dutch clover is good to mix in lawns, but make sure it has been treated to grow.  The seed cannot sprout until once frozen, and then dolomite scattered at the time the seed is spread is great for eliminating acidity in the soil which the young plants don't like.  If someone has reliable sources for many of the plants I listed above please post back.  Thanks.

      Guro Dennis Servaes

      http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/csemt/

      http://www.dennisservaes.com/

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