Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

tiller pilots and the bucc275

Expand Messages
  • bucclivaboard
    i found that if i want a tiller pilot i have a few options but raymarine seems the best. the st1000 is for boat 5000lbs and less, i have a b275 thats some
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 17, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      i found that if i want a tiller pilot i have a few options but
      raymarine seems the best. the st1000 is for boat 5000lbs and less, i
      have a b275 thats some where around maybe 6000lbs has anyone used one a
      bit to small before? will it eat up the motor if its to big of a boat?
      thanks
    • crunkinator@ymail.com
      ... good luck finding an affordable auto pilot. i have been watching C/L and ebay for something i can afford but haven t had any luck yet. i didn t think an
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 20, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "bucclivaboard"
        <natfrost@...> wrote:
        >
        > i found that if i want a tiller pilot i have a few options but
        > raymarine seems the best. the st1000 is for boat 5000lbs and less, i
        > have a b275 thats some where around maybe 6000lbs has anyone used one a
        > bit to small before? will it eat up the motor if its to big of a boat?
        > thanks
        >
        good luck finding an affordable auto pilot. i have been watching C/L
        and ebay for something i can afford but haven't had any luck yet. i
        didn't think an auto tiller was very important until about a month ago
        when i let my sister steer while I put up a spinnaker. she let it
        drift about 20 degrees and the wind sent the spin, pole and me into 47
        degree water.
      • bucclivaboard
        well i single hand so i have to be carfull if i fall in its all over. how did she get you back? hade she sailed before? and how the hell did you live with the
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 20, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          well i single hand so i have to be carfull if i fall in its all over.
          how did she get you back? hade she sailed before? and how the hell did
          you live with the water being so cold?
        • crunkinator@ymail.com
          ... Well, I had practiced M.O.B. with her by throwing a life jacket over and hollering man overboard. She got decent at it except she froze when it counted.
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 20, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "bucclivaboard"
            <natfrost@...> wrote:
            >
            > well i single hand so i have to be carfull if i fall in its all over.
            > how did she get you back? hade she sailed before? and how the hell did
            > you live with the water being so cold?
            >
            Well, I had practiced M.O.B. with her by throwing a life jacket over
            and hollering man overboard. She got decent at it except she froze
            when it counted. When the pole and spin hit me I hung on to the pole
            for dear life but the boat whipped around towards wind and tilted so
            much the pole was in the water with me still hanging onto it. The
            casting on the mast end of the pole broke and I became a fishing lure
            trailing behind the boat. It took a few minutes to climb back up the
            tangle of sail and lines and finally got beside the boat. Then I was
            able to grab a stantion and work my way to the back of the boat and
            around the motor and tiller to the spot a ladder could be placed.
            That's when I yelled at my sister to get the ladder from below and
            hang it over. That was what broke her out of her trance or whatever
            it's called. The first thing I did after she got the ladder down was
            to hand her my sweat pants. Being trailed along at 5 or 6 knots
            caused the water to pull them down and were hung on my shoes. They
            were like an anchor on my feet and I had to get them off before I
            could climb the ladder. It was in the middle of the night so no one
            saw me mooning the moon except my sister. Modesty wasn't a concern at
            the moment but it really didn't matter since there wasn't anything to
            see. That cold water made me an "innie' instead of an "outie". After
            putting my pants back on and wishing I had a change of clothes on
            board, I got the sail, lines and bent pole back on the boat then went
            below until we were back at the marina.
            Lessons learned:
            1) practicing m.o.b. drills doesn't guaranty one flippin' thing!
            throw out the life ring instantly? nope, still brand new, never
            got wet.
            steer into the wind to stop the boat? nope again. stayed on coarse
            drop the main sail? do I need to say it? no it wasn't dropped.
            2) have dry clothes, blankets etc stored for emergency.
            3) don't let little sisters steer your boat when your in a vulnerable
            situation.
            4) have an emergency strobe to use when sailing in rough water at
            night. (I bought 2 since then)
            5) don't let little sisters steer your boat in any situation.
            6) a cast aluminum spinnaker end will not support 300 lbs of stupid.
            7) after spending 15 minutes in 47 degree water, it will take 34 hrs
            and 22 min for the "innie" to once again be an "outie"
            8) sweat pants make an excellent sea anchor.
            9) don't let little sisters look at the tiller.
          • bucclivaboard
            wow! glad you made it! where was your ladder? on the stern or on the side? i found that foul weather gear fills up realy quick, and you have to have a pfd on
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 21, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              wow! glad you made it! where was your ladder? on the stern or on the
              side? i found that foul weather gear fills up realy quick, and you have
              to have a pfd on or you sink! and they snag on every thing when you are
              climbing in to a life raft! what size boat was it? and thank you for
              the tips i wont let my older sister steer! or my brother (who says "i
              dont get sea sick" well 1 hour latter we where in 5-7 chop in 30 knots
              of wind with full genny up and 2 reefs in the main! heeling like 40+
              deg.
            • Bill Crunk
              I went for my swim off the port side. The ladder is not mounted yet but the only place it will hang good is on the right side of the stern (the kicker is on
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 21, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                I went for my swim off the port side.  The ladder is not mounted yet but the only place it will hang good is on the right side of the stern (the kicker is on the left side of the rudder). My bucc is a 24 but I wasn't on it. I was using my Capri 25 which is on a different lake.

                On Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 7:16 AM, bucclivaboard <natfrost@...> wrote:

                wow! glad you made it! where was your ladder? on the stern or on the
                side? i found that foul weather gear fills up realy quick, and you have
                to have a pfd on or you sink! and they snag on every thing when you are
                climbing in to a life raft! what size boat was it? and thank you for
                the tips i wont let my older sister steer! or my brother (who says "i
                dont get sea sick" well 1 hour latter we where in 5-7 chop in 30 knots
                of wind with full genny up and 2 reefs in the main! heeling like 40+
                deg.


              • Phil Collins
                Just food for thought - Having used the higher-end pilots, if I were buying new I would not buy the base model. They aren t cheap anyway, so in for a
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 27, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Just food for thought -

                  Having used the higher-end pilots, if I were buying new I would not buy
                  the base model. They aren't cheap anyway, so "in for a penny..."
                  spend a little extra and get one that will interface with GPS and Wind
                  instruments etc. (Of course if you won't be having wind and speed and
                  course instruments that can output the proper data, forget it.)
                  The latest generation of pilots work exceptionally well and for long
                  trips will be well worth it. It is amazing to have a pilot steer to
                  the apparent wind in the ocean swells! And it's very nice to be able
                  to plot waypoints on GPS/plotter while motoring for hours or even days
                  on a delivery trip.
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.