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Re: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: Motor Mount Problem

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  • budvar
    Carl, I’ve seen this (raised chainplates) done online, and also in the book “This Old Boat (highly recommended). I guess the theory is that one way leaks
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
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      Carl,
      I’ve seen this (raised chainplates) done online, and also in the book “This Old Boat (highly recommended).   I guess the theory is that one way
      leaks can occur is because there is too little space around the chainplate to calk.  Opening up the area a little lets you fill around the chainplate, then
      install the chainplate cover on top.  Raising the area theoretically gets the surface of the chainplate off the deck somewhat, lessening the chances of water
      getting through.  I didn’t have a huge problem, but lots of time, waiting for the standing rigging to be replaced.  So started taking everything apart, all the way
      down to the wood bracing.  For good measure, replaced all the bolts holding the chainplate to the finished wood board down below.  Also added backing plates
      to go behind the wood bracing (before was just washers).  Will try to post pictures of this as well.  Chris
       
      From: Carl
      Sent: Friday, June 14, 2013 8:21 AM
      Subject: Re: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: Motor Mount Problem
       
       

      I am in the process of doing the same thing on my buc 250.  Why did you raise the area on the deck?

      Sent from my iPhone

      On Jun 14, 2013, at 4:37 AM, "charles" <adam56usa@...> wrote:

       

      Great job on raising the chainplates. Great idea! Glad you removed the wood also. The boat will give you many years of trouble free pleasure.

      --- In mailto:BaylinerBuccaneerGroup%40yahoogroups.com, "ranger50" <budvar@...> wrote:
      >
      > I removed the chainplates, polished them. Removed the wood they were
      > attached to (down below) and refinished them. Raised the area on the
      > deck where the plates come out. Here is a picture: raised chainplates
      > <http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/23878320/sn/59021874/name/chainplate3.jpg>
      >
      > --- In mailto:BaylinerBuccaneerGroup%40yahoogroups.com, Carl
      > <carl_muehlenbeck@> wrote:
      > >
      > > What are you doing with the chain plates?
      > --- In mailto:BaylinerBuccaneerGroup%40yahoogroups.com, Carl wrote:
      > >
      > > What are you doing with the chain plates?
      > >
      > > Sent from my iPhone
      > >
      >

    • Carl
      That makes sense. Im trying to get by without painting the deck. I am planning to just polish it out with compound. I am planning to just use 3m 5200 to
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
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        That makes sense.  Im trying to get by without painting the deck.  I am planning to just polish it out with compound.  I am planning to just use 3m 5200 to seal the chain plates.  Is there something better i should use?

        I saw that some replaced the wood support beam with aluminum.  Thought about it, But i used marine plywood.  Aluminum seems to corrode, specially when touching stainless chain plates.  Seems like that factory would have used aluminum if it was a better solution...if they had it back then.   Lol



        Sent from my iPhone

        On Jun 14, 2013, at 3:54 PM, "budvar" <budvar@...> wrote:

         

        Carl,
        I’ve seen this (raised chainplates) done online, and also in the book “This Old Boat (highly recommended).   I guess the theory is that one way
        leaks can occur is because there is too little space around the chainplate to calk.  Opening up the area a little lets you fill around the chainplate, then
        install the chainplate cover on top.  Raising the area theoretically gets the surface of the chainplate off the deck somewhat, lessening the chances of water
        getting through.  I didn’t have a huge problem, but lots of time, waiting for the standing rigging to be replaced.  So started taking everything apart, all the way
        down to the wood bracing.  For good measure, replaced all the bolts holding the chainplate to the finished wood board down below.  Also added backing plates
        to go behind the wood bracing (before was just washers).  Will try to post pictures of this as well.  Chris
         
        From: Carl
        Sent: Friday, June 14, 2013 8:21 AM
        Subject: Re: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: Motor Mount Problem
         
         

        I am in the process of doing the same thing on my buc 250.  Why did you raise the area on the deck?

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Jun 14, 2013, at 4:37 AM, "charles" <adam56usa@...> wrote:

         

        Great job on raising the chainplates. Great idea! Glad you removed the wood also. The boat will give you many years of trouble free pleasure.

        --- In mailto:BaylinerBuccaneerGroup%40yahoogroups.com, "ranger50" <budvar@...> wrote:
        >
        > I removed the chainplates, polished them. Removed the wood they were
        > attached to (down below) and refinished them. Raised the area on the
        > deck where the plates come out. Here is a picture: raised chainplates
        > <http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/23878320/sn/59021874/name/chainplate3.jpg>
        >
        > --- In mailto:BaylinerBuccaneerGroup%40yahoogroups.com, Carl
        > <carl_muehlenbeck@> wrote:
        > >
        > > What are you doing with the chain plates?
        > --- In mailto:BaylinerBuccaneerGroup%40yahoogroups.com, Carl wrote:
        > >
        > > What are you doing with the chain plates?
        > >
        > > Sent from my iPhone
        > >
        >

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