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Re: Mast Base HUGE Problem!

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  • ranger50
    I learned volumes on this project. Borrowed a bit from another forum on sailnet.com. Short story: US Yacht 25. Mast down, replacing standingrigging. Checked
    Message 1 of 26 , May 17, 2013
      I learned volumes on this project.  Borrowed a bit from another forum on sailnet.com.

      Short story:  US Yacht 25.  Mast down, replacing standingrigging.  Checked the mast step, had 4 machine bolts into deck, two of the holes were stripped.  The holes were into the decking/plywood sandwich.  No backing plate.

      I prepared to fill the hole with epoxy, then retap.  But wait.....epoxy makes a weak thread.  Wouldn't it strip again? 

      Found an old article on sailnet.com.  Someone had a similar problem.  One person theorized that setting a hex coupling in epoxy would be the solution. 

      I went around town, found one SS coupling, then went to another local Co.  they had a smaller coupling (necessary as the US Yacht mast base bolts are less then 1.25" then you open a hole into the head!).

      Long story short:  oversized the mast step bolt holes to 7/8" or so.  One hole when thru to the "head" (covered hole with duck tape per dude on Compass Marine).   Ended up being 5/16 hex coupling.  Used a flat head screw on bottom of coupling to help keep intact and from crawling up when tightened, if that makes sense, please see pictures. 

      Friend of mine recommended roughing up the SS so the epoxy has something to grip on.  The rest I did as per Compass Marine.

      It worked!  Now this should be an improvement on the original, that is real threads for the mast step to grip on.

      Hope this helps, I learned volumes by doing this, couldn't have done without the help here and from Sail.net.

      There are pictures on the album "ranger 50".  ranger 50


      Chris




      --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "charles" wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > On my US 25, when I removed the plate because water was leaking in, there was nothing inside the deck. I took a Allen wrench and shortened the short end, put it in a drill and used that to ream out the holes just a bit. Then I filled the holes with git rot. That is an epoxy used when there is dry rot. The reason for doing this is to prevent water from entering the deck and damaging the wood core between the inside layer of fiberglass and outside layer of fiberglass. You don't have to tap the bolt holes. Just make sure no water got in there. You have to be careful when pouring it in. No matter how well you tape the underside the hole will leak when pouring that stuff in. Once it cures, re-drill the holes. I put a stainless steel plate, 6"x8" on the inside for strength. There was nothing before , only big flat washers and lock nuts. The front bolts are longer because the deck is thicker there. It's a good thing you are re- doing that before raising the mast. When you put the plate back in, use good marine caulk, not silicone , to reseal the bolt holes. I used Boat Life caulk. It's expensive but you really need good caulk to seal the holes. If you Google Git Rot, you can find videos on how to use it. It is very expensive also but is one of the best products out there for this type of purpose. Make sure your deck is dry and undamaged from water leaking through. When raising the mast, put a coin underneath. That's an old tradition. Don't use copper! Use either nickle or silver. Anymore questions just ask. I'm a long winded old man. You are doing the right thing by removing this plate. Also, very important, check your chainplates and the wood they are attached to. That is an easy inexpensive job. Use the old wood as a template if necessary. Just check them. You should rebed them also. Again, no silicone caulk. Boat Life. This way when you raise the mast, you can sleep nights.
      > Charlie
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "ranger50" budvar@ wrote:
      > >
      > > Mast is down. Thought I'd check and re-do the mast plate to hull connection (US Yacht 25).
      > >
      > > There are 4 bolts that connect stepplate to hull. The way I removed them, two forward longer bolts, two smaller aft bolts.
      > >
      > > The two aft holes (not the bolts) are both stripped. Not sure how long it's been this way or if I caused.
      > >
      > > Is there a metal base below topside that the stepplate bolts to? To me, it looks like it's just the hull threaded to accept these (machine S.S.) bolts. Or perhaps a heli-coil of some sort in the hull?
      > >
      > > To fix. Can I just tap a slightly bigger hole, using normal tap/die equipment, then oversize the machine bolt (will have to enlarge the metal stepplate also to accept the new bolt). Or perhaps clean hole, fill with resin and redrill/tap to original size.
      > >
      > > Why two different sized bolts (forward bolts longer than the two aft stepplate bolts).
      > >
      > > I realize this is a critical aspect of the boat. Do want to get it right.
      > >
      > > Thanks again,
      > >
      > > Chris
      > >
      >
    • charles
      Mine just had hex head bolts that went all the way through with nuts and washers. Anyway, good job!
      Message 2 of 26 , May 17, 2013
        Mine just had hex head bolts that went all the way through with nuts and washers. Anyway, good job!
        --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "ranger50" <budvar@...> wrote:
        >
        > I learned volumes on this project. Borrowed a bit from another forum on
        > sailnet.com.
        >
        > Short story: US Yacht 25. Mast down, replacing standingrigging.
        > Checked the mast step, had 4 machine bolts into deck, two of the holes
        > were stripped. The holes were into the decking/plywood sandwich. No
        > backing plate.
        >
        > I prepared to fill the hole with epoxy, then retap. But wait.....epoxy
        > makes a weak thread. Wouldn't it strip again?
        >
        > Found an old article on sailnet.com. Someone had a similar problem.
        > One person theorized that setting a hex coupling in epoxy would be the
        > solution.
        >
        > I went around town, found one SS coupling, then went to another local
        > Co. they had a smaller coupling (necessary as the US Yacht mast base
        > bolts are less then 1.25" then you open a hole into the head!).
        >
        > Long story short: oversized the mast step bolt holes to 7/8" or so.
        > One hole when thru to the "head" (covered hole with duck tape per dude
        > on Compass Marine). Ended up being 5/16 hex coupling. Used a flat
        > head screw on bottom of coupling to help keep intact and from crawling
        > up when tightened, if that makes sense, please see pictures.
        >
        > Friend of mine recommended roughing up the SS so the epoxy has something
        > to grip on. The rest I did as per Compass Marine.
        >
        > It worked! Now this should be an improvement on the original, that is
        > real threads for the mast step to grip on.
        >
        > Hope this helps, I learned volumes by doing this, couldn't have done
        > without the help here and from Sail.net.
        >
        > There are pictures on the album "ranger 50". ranger 50
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BaylinerBuccaneerGroup/photos/album/18158\
        > 42054/pic/list#tab>
        >
        >
        > Chris
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "charles" wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > On my US 25, when I removed the plate because water was leaking in,
        > there was nothing inside the deck. I took a Allen wrench and shortened
        > the short end, put it in a drill and used that to ream out the holes
        > just a bit. Then I filled the holes with git rot. That is an epoxy used
        > when there is dry rot. The reason for doing this is to prevent water
        > from entering the deck and damaging the wood core between the inside
        > layer of fiberglass and outside layer of fiberglass. You don't have to
        > tap the bolt holes. Just make sure no water got in there. You have to be
        > careful when pouring it in. No matter how well you tape the underside
        > the hole will leak when pouring that stuff in. Once it cures, re-drill
        > the holes. I put a stainless steel plate, 6"x8" on the inside for
        > strength. There was nothing before , only big flat washers and lock
        > nuts. The front bolts are longer because the deck is thicker there. It's
        > a good thing you are re- doing that before raising the mast. When you
        > put the plate back in, use good marine caulk, not silicone , to reseal
        > the bolt holes. I used Boat Life caulk. It's expensive but you really
        > need good caulk to seal the holes. If you Google Git Rot, you can find
        > videos on how to use it. It is very expensive also but is one of the
        > best products out there for this type of purpose. Make sure your deck is
        > dry and undamaged from water leaking through. When raising the mast, put
        > a coin underneath. That's an old tradition. Don't use copper! Use either
        > nickle or silver. Anymore questions just ask. I'm a long winded old man.
        > You are doing the right thing by removing this plate. Also, very
        > important, check your chainplates and the wood they are attached to.
        > That is an easy inexpensive job. Use the old wood as a template if
        > necessary. Just check them. You should rebed them also. Again, no
        > silicone caulk. Boat Life. This way when you raise the mast, you can
        > sleep nights.
        > > Charlie
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "ranger50" budvar@
        > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Mast is down. Thought I'd check and re-do the mast plate to hull
        > connection (US Yacht 25).
        > > >
        > > > There are 4 bolts that connect stepplate to hull. The way I removed
        > them, two forward longer bolts, two smaller aft bolts.
        > > >
        > > > The two aft holes (not the bolts) are both stripped. Not sure how
        > long it's been this way or if I caused.
        > > >
        > > > Is there a metal base below topside that the stepplate bolts to? To
        > me, it looks like it's just the hull threaded to accept these (machine
        > S.S.) bolts. Or perhaps a heli-coil of some sort in the hull?
        > > >
        > > > To fix. Can I just tap a slightly bigger hole, using normal tap/die
        > equipment, then oversize the machine bolt (will have to enlarge the
        > metal stepplate also to accept the new bolt). Or perhaps clean hole,
        > fill with resin and redrill/tap to original size.
        > > >
        > > > Why two different sized bolts (forward bolts longer than the two aft
        > stepplate bolts).
        > > >
        > > > I realize this is a critical aspect of the boat. Do want to get it
        > right.
        > > >
        > > > Thanks again,
        > > >
        > > > Chris
        > > >
        > >
        >
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