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Re: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: 1979 Bayliner 25'

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  • jbrosser1951@yahoo.com
    Phil, thank you for your reponse.  My wife and I took Basic ASA lessons 18 months ago in Galveston Bay and have chartered (soloed) only a couple of times
    Message 1 of 11 , May 28, 2009
    Phil, thank you for your reponse.  My wife and I took Basic ASA lessons 18 months ago in Galveston Bay and have chartered (soloed) only a couple of times since.  However, our goal has been to own our own sailboat (not too big, freshwater to start, don't spend too much up front but with an eye on improvements over time).  The owner is asking $3,000.  The asking price includes a new 2008 6hp Tohatsu extended shaft outboard.  However, he will take $2000 if I buy the boat with the old 5hp Johnson-old and not as reliable.
     
    The sails include a mainsail, jib, genoa and spinaker. He says in good condition but faded.  If I move forward, I'll do a trial sail with the owner next Wed. or Thursday.  It does have a new stove, but no other equipment.  He's used shorepower for lights when sleeping aboard at dock, but never used the battery for power.  The owner is out of town until next Tuesday. He gave me the keys to look it over.  May go out today and pull the sails to see how they look.  Won't know about sail shape until he and I go out.  The boat is dry and seems to be solid.  However, as you'll see in a pic, the bow was apparently damaged many years ago, when the mast fell and hit the pulpit doing some slight damage to where the pulpit is connected to the bow.  Pulpit is slightly bent.  No structural damage.  The bow repair took place prior to the current owner and was never fully completed.  However, all appears to be structurally sound with no leakage.  Would like your opinion on this.
     
    I've attached some pics.  The upholstery needs changing (wife is a seamstress and can do that).  I'm sure the bottom will need repainting.  May need to repaint hull, but would appreciate your thoughts.  Will need new battery, and will probably have to have some electrical work done.  Chainplates look solid.  No cracks or softness on deck.  Lines will need replacing, but can do over time.  The front hatch needs to be replaced-doesn't seem to seal well and hope to replace with a clear hatch, if possible.  The hand rails must be replaced.  Don't know what to do with the rails that the cockpit hatch slides through.  The standing rigging looks good.  Below, the linoleum is in very poor shape and is covered by a carpet.  Don't know what to do with that.  Below, the upper molding is exposed fiberglass-not sure if that's standard with these models.  The lower area is covered and in good shape.
     
    I'm going to pour over it this weekend.  If I move forward, I'm considering offering no more than $2300 as is including new motor.  Would appreciate any advice offered.
     
    Thanks again,
     
    Joe

    --- On Thu, 5/28/09, Phil Collins <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:

    From: Phil Collins <PandD_Collins@...>
    Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: 1979 Bayliner 25'
    To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
    Date: Thursday, May 28, 2009, 3:11 AM

    This can be a touchy subject, but price is key as well.
    If the hull is sound, and the sails are good, cosmetics are only ... cosmetic.
    I'd need to know what equipment it has (and if any of it works,) condition of sails and trailer, motor, etc, and price to offer an opinion.
    Even condition of sails can be optional if the main goal is "dirt cheap and on the water." Although (on my soapbox again) the enjoyment of the sailing experience can be ... substantially reduced... if the sails suck. Just the other day I yet again watched someone struggling upwind, could not have been having any fun, on what I consider a perfect day (winds 10-12 ish) because the old baggy rags of sails would not shape and set well.

    You see my point.

    --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGr oup@yahoogroups. com, "jbrosser1951" <jbrosser1951@ ...> wrote:
    >
    > As a new member, I posted a request for information the other day re: my possible purchase of a "1980" Bayliner 25'. I appreciate all the responses I received re: sailability. Also, Robert sent me some great pics of the work he's done on his 25 footer. Here's my dilemna.
    >
    > I need to make a decision over the weekend re: the purchase. I was able to spend some time taking a look at the vessel today. Structurally, it looks very sound. However, cosmetically, it leaves a lot to be desired both on the outside and below. My first impression wasn't very good. But during the drive back home, I began to think about what I was after. I can't afford to spend a lot right now for a new vessel and this one sure fits that bill. I want it in freshwater for now, my wife and I are both 57 and only interested in daysailing with some occasional overnight stays.
    >
    > I'm going back tonight to show my wife and will take some pics and would like to post some in order to get your impressions and suggestions for cosmetic work if that would be appropriate. I know that I'll need to do a haul out and have the hull sanded and repainted, but I'm interested in ideas to bring it back to close to it's original look. Please send me any pics of your exterior and below of your vessel that might give me some ideas. It doesn't have to be a 25'. It will need new sail covers, handrails, cushions below. I know it will be lots of work, but am willing to do it over time.
    >
    > I apologize for the long note, but since I need to make a decision over the weekend and I need as much input that will make both myself and my wife feel better about moving forward. I would really appreciate any pis of 25' that have been restored. You can send share pics here or send to jbrosser1951@ ...
    >
    > jbrosser
    >


  • rlewellen2002
    Here s a great website dedicated to owners of 25 Buccaneers and other boats built under the name of US Yacht. www.diysailor.com. It has loads of pictures of
    Message 2 of 11 , May 28, 2009
      Here's a great website dedicated to owners of 25' Buccaneers and other boats built under the name of US Yacht. www.diysailor.com. It has loads of pictures of the type you're looking for: before, during and after restoration projects, original product brochures, etc.
      I've spent alot of time and energy restoring my 1980 US Yacht/Buccaneer. It was built locally in the Arlington, WA Bayliner factory (which sadly closed last year). Bayline seemed to do a pretty good job on gelcoat, as most boats I've seen can be brought back to their original luster with fiberglass restoring compound/wax.
      Invest first in the boat's propulsion, both sails and motor. The other stuff can be added over time. I'll post some photos of "Tenacious", my boat on the site.
      Enjoy! Rick Lewellen, Camano Island, WA
    • Joseph Rosser
      Rick, would enjoy pics of both exterior and interior.  Thanks.   Joe ... From: rlewellen2002 Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup]
      Message 3 of 11 , May 28, 2009
        Rick, would enjoy pics of both exterior and interior.  Thanks.
         
        Joe

        --- On Thu, 5/28/09, rlewellen2002 <rlewellen@...> wrote:

        From: rlewellen2002 <rlewellen@...>
        Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: 1979 Bayliner 25'
        To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, May 28, 2009, 9:09 AM

        Here's a great website dedicated to owners of 25' Buccanners and other boats built under the name of US Yacht. www.diysailor. com. It has loads of pictures of the type you're looking for: before, during and after restoration projects, original product brochures, etc.
        I've spent alot of time and energy restoring my 1980 US Yacht/Buccanner. It was built locally in the Arlington, WA Bayliner factory (which sadly closed last year). Bayline seemed to do a pretty good job on gelcoat, as most boats I've seen can be brought back to their original luster with fiberglass restoring compound.
        Invest first in the boat's propulsion, both sails and motor. the other stuff can be added over time. I'll post some photos of "Tenacious", my boat on the site.
        Enjoy! Rick Lewellen, Camano Island, WA


      • wleberg
        It sounds like you want the boat. Now you have to haggle the price. Point out all the issues . Shake your head. Tell him you will take the boat for $1800 with
        Message 4 of 11 , May 28, 2009
          It sounds like you want the boat. Now you have to haggle the price. Point out all the "issues". Shake your head. Tell him you will take the boat for $1800 with the Tohatsu or 1000 with the Johnson. "Oh my!" Tell him about your allocation of money $2000. At best you can only do $2000 with the Tohatsu. Tell him the money it will take to get it to "Sailing" order. Look at the bow. Look at the "sails". Oh my. There is a very good chance you are the only customer. The boat is a very good boat and is worth every dollar you can save on her.

          Walt

          --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, jbrosser1951@... wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Phil, thank you for your reponse.  My wife and I took Basic ASA lessons 18 months ago in Galveston Bay and have chartered (soloed) only a couple of times since.  However, our goal has been to own our own sailboat (not too big, freshwater to start, don't spend too much up front but with an eye on improvements over time).  The owner is asking $3,000.  The asking price includes a new 2008 6hp Tohatsu extended shaft outboard.  However, he will take $2000 if I buy the boat with the old 5hp Johnson-old and not as reliable.
          >  
          > The sails include a mainsail, jib, genoa and spinaker. He says in good condition but faded.  If I move forward, I'll do a trial sail with the owner next Wed. or Thursday.  It does have a new stove, but no other equipment.  He's used shorepower for lights when sleeping aboard at dock, but never used the battery for power.  The owner is out of town until next Tuesday. He gave me the keys to look it over.  May go out today and pull the sails to see how they look.  Won't know about sail shape until he and I go out.  The boat is dry and seems to be solid.  However, as you'll see in a pic, the bow was apparently damaged many years ago, when the mast fell and hit the pulpit doing some slight damage to where the pulpit is connected to the bow.  Pulpit is slightly bent.  No structural damage.  The bow repair took place prior to the current owner and was never fully completed.  However, all appears to be structurally sound with no leakage.  Would like
          > your opinion on this.
          >  
          > I've attached some pics.  The upholstery needs changing (wife is a seamstress and can do that).  I'm sure the bottom will need repainting.  May need to repaint hull, but would appreciate your thoughts.  Will need new battery, and will probably have to have some electrical work done.  Chainplates look solid.  No cracks or softness on deck.  Lines will need replacing, but can do over time.  The front hatch needs to be replaced-doesn't seem to seal well and hope to replace with a clear hatch, if possible.  The hand rails must be replaced.  Don't know what to do with the rails that the cockpit hatch slides through.  The standing rigging looks good.  Below, the linoleum is in very poor shape and is covered by a carpet.  Don't know what to do with that.  Below, the upper molding is exposed fiberglass-not sure if that's standard with these models.  The lower area is covered and in good shape.
          >  
          > I'm going to pour over it this weekend.  If I move forward, I'm considering offering no more than $2300 as is including new motor.  Would appreciate any advice offered.
          >  
          > Thanks again,
          >  
          > Joe
          >
          > --- On Thu, 5/28/09, Phil Collins <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: Phil Collins <PandD_Collins@...>
          > Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: 1979 Bayliner 25'
          > To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Thursday, May 28, 2009, 3:11 AM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > This can be a touchy subject, but price is key as well.
          > If the hull is sound, and the sails are good, cosmetics are only ... cosmetic.
          > I'd need to know what equipment it has (and if any of it works,) condition of sails and trailer, motor, etc, and price to offer an opinion.
          > Even condition of sails can be optional if the main goal is "dirt cheap and on the water." Although (on my soapbox again) the enjoyment of the sailing experience can be ... substantially reduced... if the sails suck. Just the other day I yet again watched someone struggling upwind, could not have been having any fun, on what I consider a perfect day (winds 10-12 ish) because the old baggy rags of sails would not shape and set well.
          >
          > You see my point.
          >
          > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGr oup@yahoogroups. com, "jbrosser1951" <jbrosser1951@ ...> wrote:
          > >
          > > As a new member, I posted a request for information the other day re: my possible purchase of a "1980" Bayliner 25'. I appreciate all the responses I received re: sailability. Also, Robert sent me some great pics of the work he's done on his 25 footer. Here's my dilemna.
          > >
          > > I need to make a decision over the weekend re: the purchase. I was able to spend some time taking a look at the vessel today. Structurally, it looks very sound. However, cosmetically, it leaves a lot to be desired both on the outside and below. My first impression wasn't very good. But during the drive back home, I began to think about what I was after. I can't afford to spend a lot right now for a new vessel and this one sure fits that bill. I want it in freshwater for now, my wife and I are both 57 and only interested in daysailing with some occasional overnight stays.
          > >
          > > I'm going back tonight to show my wife and will take some pics and would like to post some in order to get your impressions and suggestions for cosmetic work if that would be appropriate. I know that I'll need to do a haul out and have the hull sanded and repainted, but I'm interested in ideas to bring it back to close to it's original look. Please send me any pics of your exterior and below of your vessel that might give me some ideas. It doesn't have to be a 25'. It will need new sail covers, handrails, cushions below. I know it will be lots of work, but am willing to do it over time.
          > >
          > > I apologize for the long note, but since I need to make a decision over the weekend and I need as much input that will make both myself and my wife feel better about moving forward. I would really appreciate any pis of 25' that have been restored. You can send share pics here or send to jbrosser1951@ ...
          > >
          > > jbrosser
          > >
          >
        • Joseph Rosser
          Walt, thank you for the great advice.  What did you mean when you said, tell him about your allocation of money $2000 ?  Looking at the bow, since I m not a
          Message 5 of 11 , May 28, 2009
            Walt, thank you for the great advice.  What did you mean when you said, "tell him about your allocation of money $2000"?  Looking at the bow, since I'm not a fiberglass guy, is that something a pro can make look good?
             
            Joe

            --- On Thu, 5/28/09, wleberg <wleberg@...> wrote:

            From: wleberg <wleberg@...>
            Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: 1979 Bayliner 25'
            To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, May 28, 2009, 11:14 AM

            It sounds like you want the boat. Now you have to haggle the price. Point out all the "issues". Shake your head. Tell him you will take the boat for $1800 with the Tohatsu or 1000 with the Johnson. "Oh my!" Tell him about your allocation of money $2000. At best you can only do $2000 with the Tohatsu. Tell him the money it will take to get it to "Sailing" order. Look at the bow. Look at the "sails". Oh my. There is a very good chance you are the only customer. The boat is a very good boat and is worth every dollar you can save on her.

            Walt

            --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGr oup@yahoogroups. com, jbrosser1951@ ... wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > Phil, thank you for your reponse.  My wife and I took Basic ASA lessons 18 months ago in Galveston Bay and have chartered (soloed) only a couple of times since.  However, our goal has been to own our own sailboat (not too big, freshwater to start, don't spend too much up front but with an eye on improvements over time).  The owner is asking $3,000.  The asking price includes a new 2008 6hp Tohatsu extended shaft outboard.  However, he will take $2000 if I buy the boat with the old 5hp Johnson-old and not as reliable.
            >  
            > The sails include a mainsail, jib, genoa and spinaker. He says in good condition but faded.  If I move forward, I'll do a trial sail with the owner next Wed. or Thursday.  It does have a new stove, but no other equipment.  He's used shorepower for lights when sleeping aboard at dock, but never used the battery for power.  The owner is out of town until next Tuesday. He gave me the keys to look it over.  May go out today and pull the sails to see how they look.  Won't know about sail shape until he and I go out.  The boat is dry and seems to be solid.  However, as you'll see in a pic, the bow was apparently damaged many years ago, when the mast fell and hit the pulpit doing some slight damage to where the pulpit is connected to the bow.  Pulpit is slightly bent.  No structural damage.  The bow repair took place prior to the current owner and was never fully completed.  However, all appears to be structurally sound with no leakage.  Would like
            > your opinion on this.
            >  
            > I've attached some pics.  The upholstery needs changing (wife is a seamstress and can do that).  I'm sure the bottom will need repainting.  May need to repaint hull, but would appreciate your thoughts.  Will need new battery, and will probably have to have some electrical work done.  Chainplates look solid.  No cracks or softness on deck.  Lines will need replacing, but can do over time.  The front hatch needs to be replaced-doesn' t seem to seal well and hope to replace with a clear hatch, if possible.  The hand rails must be replaced.  Don't know what to do with the rails that the cockpit hatch slides through.  The standing rigging looks good.  Below, the linoleum is in very poor shape and is covered by a carpet.  Don't know what to do with that.  Below, the upper molding is exposed fiberglass-not sure if that's standard with these models.  The lower area is covered and in good shape.
            >  
            > I'm going to pour over it this weekend.  If I move forward, I'm considering offering no more than $2300 as is including new motor.  Would appreciate any advice offered.
            >  
            > Thanks again,
            >  
            > Joe
            >
            > --- On Thu, 5/28/09, Phil Collins <PandD_Collins@ ...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: Phil Collins <PandD_Collins@ ...>
            > Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerG roup] Re: 1979 Bayliner 25'
            > To: BaylinerBuccaneerGr oup@yahoogroups. com
            > Date: Thursday, May 28, 2009, 3:11 AM
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > This can be a touchy subject, but price is key as well.
            > If the hull is sound, and the sails are good, cosmetics are only ... cosmetic.
            > I'd need to know what equipment it has (and if any of it works,) condition of sails and trailer, motor, etc, and price to offer an opinion.
            > Even condition of sails can be optional if the main goal is "dirt cheap and on the water." Although (on my soapbox again) the enjoyment of the sailing experience can be ... substantially reduced... if the sails suck. Just the other day I yet again watched someone struggling upwind, could not have been having any fun, on what I consider a perfect day (winds 10-12 ish) because the old baggy rags of sails would not shape and set well.
            >
            > You see my point.
            >
            > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGr oup@yahoogroups. com, "jbrosser1951" <jbrosser1951@ ...> wrote:
            > >
            > > As a new member, I posted a request for information the other day re: my possible purchase of a "1980" Bayliner 25'. I appreciate all the responses I received re: sailability. Also, Robert sent me some great pics of the work he's done on his 25 footer. Here's my dilemna.
            > >
            > > I need to make a decision over the weekend re: the purchase. I was able to spend some time taking a look at the vessel today. Structurally, it looks very sound. However, cosmetically, it leaves a lot to be desired both on the outside and below. My first impression wasn't very good. But during the drive back home, I began to think about what I was after. I can't afford to spend a lot right now for a new vessel and this one sure fits that bill. I want it in freshwater for now, my wife and I are both 57 and only interested in daysailing with some occasional overnight stays.
            > >
            > > I'm going back tonight to show my wife and will take some pics and would like to post some in order to get your impressions and suggestions for cosmetic work if that would be appropriate. I know that I'll need to do a haul out and have the hull sanded and repainted, but I'm interested in ideas to bring it back to close to it's original look. Please send me any pics of your exterior and below of your vessel that might give me some ideas. It doesn't have to be a 25'. It will need new sail covers, handrails, cushions below. I know it will be lots of work, but am willing to do it over time.
            > >
            > > I apologize for the long note, but since I need to make a decision over the weekend and I need as much input that will make both myself and my wife feel better about moving forward. I would really appreciate any pis of 25' that have been restored. You can send share pics here or send to jbrosser1951@ ...
            > >
            > > jbrosser
            > >
            >


          • Phil Collins
            He probably meant tell him that s all you can afford to spend. I d much rather have the new 4 stroke. They cost around $1500. The glass repair is sure ugly.
            Message 6 of 11 , May 28, 2009
              He probably meant tell him that's all you can afford to spend.
              I'd much rather have the new 4 stroke. They cost around $1500.

              The glass repair is sure ugly. If they did it securely enough, cleaning up the appearance is easy. If it needed cut out and redone, *I* could do it but if you have to have a pro do it, it will cost you - as much as a couple grand I'd expect. If the boat has been sailed a few years that way it's probably secure.

              First thing I'd do is find an old salt who knows what he's looking at have him inspect the rig. "looks okay" doesn't cut it, unless you actually know what signs on age, stress, and impending doom look like. Will cost a good 2 grand for all new standing rigging.

              At that price you can do a lot of fixing and still have a great boat for little investment. I would make darn sure it's actually sailable now, then after I bought it start working on it. I'd pull the chainplates out of the deck - where they're hidden from view is where they corrode and fail.

              I would walk the deck and "step and thump" looking for soft spots, especailly the foredeck and around bedded hardware. Do the same with the cabin sole - it's plywood. Rugs are fine but carpeting as such holds moisture and is verboten on my boats. Soft spots in the deck can be fixed by you, unless the whole thing is gone, and the cabin sole same thing - some softspots are no big deal, the whole interior rotted is a big deal. Look under the furniture - they are made of plywood too and subject to rotting. You can fix it yourself though, but it's a 'labor of love.'

              --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Rosser <jbrosser1951@...> wrote:
              >
              > Walt, thank you for the great advice.  What did you mean when you said, "tell him about your allocation of money $2000"?  Looking at the bow, since I'm not a fiberglass guy, is that something a pro can make look good?
              >  
            • wleberg
              Phil is correct. Make sure you know the boat your are buying. He is giving excellent advice. What I am describing is the negotiating phase. You should be armed
              Message 7 of 11 , May 29, 2009
                Phil is correct. Make sure you know the boat your are buying. He is giving excellent advice. What I am describing is the negotiating phase. You should be armed with all the knowledge you can get about the condition of the boat. After you decide to buy the boat and you are face to face with the seller, you should not go around the boat pointed out all the neat features and how much you love the boat. You should go around pointing out all the problems and why the boat is only worth ($1500?) with the used and unknown status of the Tohatsu. (Do not take his word for it.) You have moved out of the phase of deciding if you want the boat. Now you need to negotiate a price that is agreeable between the two of you. If you got the money, give the man $3000. He probably can use the money. But I suspect you are not that well off and you will need the money to work on the boat. I say haggle. Work the asking price down.

                Walt

                --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Phil Collins" <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
                >
                > He probably meant tell him that's all you can afford to spend.
                > I'd much rather have the new 4 stroke. They cost around $1500.
                >
                > The glass repair is sure ugly. If they did it securely enough, cleaning up the appearance is easy. If it needed cut out and redone, *I* could do it but if you have to have a pro do it, it will cost you - as much as a couple grand I'd expect. If the boat has been sailed a few years that way it's probably secure.
                >
                > First thing I'd do is find an old salt who knows what he's looking at have him inspect the rig. "looks okay" doesn't cut it, unless you actually know what signs on age, stress, and impending doom look like. Will cost a good 2 grand for all new standing rigging.
                >
                > At that price you can do a lot of fixing and still have a great boat for little investment. I would make darn sure it's actually sailable now, then after I bought it start working on it. I'd pull the chainplates out of the deck - where they're hidden from view is where they corrode and fail.
                >
                > I would walk the deck and "step and thump" looking for soft spots, especailly the foredeck and around bedded hardware. Do the same with the cabin sole - it's plywood. Rugs are fine but carpeting as such holds moisture and is verboten on my boats. Soft spots in the deck can be fixed by you, unless the whole thing is gone, and the cabin sole same thing - some softspots are no big deal, the whole interior rotted is a big deal. Look under the furniture - they are made of plywood too and subject to rotting. You can fix it yourself though, but it's a 'labor of love.'
                >
                > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Rosser <jbrosser1951@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Walt, thank you for the great advice.  What did you mean when you said, "tell him about your allocation of money $2000"?  Looking at the bow, since I'm not a fiberglass guy, is that something a pro can make look good?
                > >  
                >
              • Joseph Rosser
                Thanks Walt, I understand what you re saying.   Joe ... From: wleberg Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: 1979 Bayliner 25 To:
                Message 8 of 11 , May 29, 2009
                  Thanks Walt, I understand what you're saying.
                   
                  Joe

                  --- On Fri, 5/29/09, wleberg <wleberg@...> wrote:

                  From: wleberg <wleberg@...>
                  Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: 1979 Bayliner 25'
                  To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, May 29, 2009, 11:06 AM

                  Phil is correct. Make sure you know the boat your are buying. He is giving excellent advice. What I am describing is the negotiating phase. You should be armed with all the knowledge you can get about the condition of the boat. After you decide to buy the boat and you are face to face with the seller, you should not go around the boat pointed out all the neat features and how much you love the boat. You should go around pointing out all the problems and why the boat is only worth ($1500?) with the used and unknown status of the Tohatsu. (Do not take his word for it.) You have moved out of the phase of deciding if you want the boat. Now you need to negotiate a price that is agreeable between the two of you. If you got the money, give the man $3000. He probably can use the money. But I suspect you are not that well off and you will need the money to work on the boat. I say haggle. Work the asking price down.

                  Walt

                  --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGr oup@yahoogroups. com, "Phil Collins" <PandD_Collins@ ...> wrote:
                  >
                  > He probably meant tell him that's all you can afford to spend.
                  > I'd much rather have the new 4 stroke. They cost around $1500.
                  >
                  > The glass repair is sure ugly. If they did it securely enough, cleaning up the appearance is easy. If it needed cut out and redone, *I* could do it but if you have to have a pro do it, it will cost you - as much as a couple grand I'd expect. If the boat has been sailed a few years that way it's probably secure.
                  >
                  > First thing I'd do is find an old salt who knows what he's looking at have him inspect the rig. "looks okay" doesn't cut it, unless you actually know what signs on age, stress, and impending doom look like. Will cost a good 2 grand for all new standing rigging.
                  >
                  > At that price you can do a lot of fixing and still have a great boat for little investment. I would make darn sure it's actually sailable now, then after I bought it start working on it. I'd pull the chainplates out of the deck - where they're hidden from view is where they corrode and fail.
                  >
                  > I would walk the deck and "step and thump" looking for soft spots, especailly the foredeck and around bedded hardware. Do the same with the cabin sole - it's plywood. Rugs are fine but carpeting as such holds moisture and is verboten on my boats. Soft spots in the deck can be fixed by you, unless the whole thing is gone, and the cabin sole same thing - some softspots are no big deal, the whole interior rotted is a big deal. Look under the furniture - they are made of plywood too and subject to rotting. You can fix it yourself though, but it's a 'labor of love.'
                  >
                  > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGr oup@yahoogroups. com, Joseph Rosser <jbrosser1951@ > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Walt, thank you for the great advice.  What did you mean when you said, "tell him about your allocation of money $2000"?  Looking at the bow, since I'm not a fiberglass guy, is that something a pro can make look good?
                  > >  
                  >


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