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Re: Thoughts on upgrading pressure blocks and washers on chain stays...

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  • Moosecateer
    Thanks Phil - I really should have been a bit more careful with that description - The 325s have three very substantial, non-corrosive chain plates, bolted to
    Message 1 of 1 , May 31 12:38 PM
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      Thanks Phil - I really should have been a bit more careful with that description -

      The 325s have three very substantial, non-corrosive chain plates, bolted to the hull from the OUTSIDE.
      I was referring to upgrading the pressure blocks and washers that hold the chain plate bolts from INSIDE the main cabin.

      If the pressure blocks (which in my boat were made from teak) are still in good condition and shows no signs of cracking or splitting, then I would just recommend replacing the individual washers with a full length washer plate. Now, of course you do want to inspect the actual chain plates and bolts carefully when you disassemble them. If you decide to replace any of the pressure blocks, I would recommend replacing them all in same fashion. Also very important: keep the old blocks to use as templates, because they are sometimes custom fit to the contour of the hull/cabin.

      Another very important thing to mention is: Re-tensioning the stays is obviously a very critical adjustment and needs to be made by someone with the proper knowledge and experience.

      As far as `Plastic' wood goes, there is a wide range of quality in synthetic decking material. The better quality material is extremely strong and durable, and is essentially impervious to drying or cracking. As long as you use the higher quality stuff I still think it's a good choice for making new pressure blocks.


      --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "PhilC" <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
      >
      > I assume you meant to use the "wood" as a backing plate, not as a replacement for the chainplate...
      > That extruded plastic fake wood stuff tends to compress over time, I wouldnt trust it.
      >
      > Chainplates should be completely removed and inspected periodically. Every few years is a good idea, but for certain you should do it when you get a new boat. If any water ever got into the deck (and it is common) then the chainplate may corrode useen inside the wet deck. Even the heaviest-duty chainplates have been known to fail in this manner.
      >
      > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Will Madden wjmaustin@ wrote:
      > >>
      > > Re: the chain plates:
      > >
      > > ...>
      > > The thought I had was to use some really dense synthetic wood made for
      > > decking, and then get some full-length custom stainless or brass washer
      > > plates (with very carefully measured bolt holes.)
      >
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