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Re: Running rigging specs for buc 24

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  • PhilC
    XLE will work just fine. Those sizes look good, can t say about the lengths (Jib halyard seems awful long.) But you can check your rig and figure it out. If
    Message 1 of 7 , May 22, 2012
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      XLE will work just fine.
      Those sizes look good, can't say about the lengths (Jib halyard seems awful long.) But you can check your rig and figure it out. If you plan to lead the lines to the cockpit, add for that.

      You are right about WorstMarine's prices!

      --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "jon" <jons190@...> wrote:
      >
      > Greetings all.
      >
      > So got the new buck home and found she has zero serviceable running rigging (should have looked at that a bit harder instead of trusting the salesguy..!!!!)
      >
      > Anyway, I pretty much have to replace/re-rig everything and have a question of line sizes and lengths...
      >
      > These are the specs I found online for a '79 240 buc.
      >
      > main halyard = 68 foot of 5/16"
      > jib halyard = 83' of 5/16"
      > main sheet = 45' of 3/8"
      > Jib blocks sized at 5/16"
      >
      > I found a bunch of nova tech XLE line on ebay for:
      >
      > main halyard @ 83 foot of 5/16" for $32.00
      > jib halyard @ 100 foot 5/16" for $48.00
      > main sheet @ 50 foot of 3/8" for $35.00
      >
      > Does this seem about right? I fear what prices I may find at West Marine!!!!
      >
      >
      >
      > I also need main sail hanks (the little plasic hooks for running the sail up the mast) Does anyone know what size those are?
      >
      > Onward through the fog!
      >
    • Andres Espino
      Get mail sail slides and jib hanks at Duckworks too.   http://duckworksbbs.com/sailmaking/hardware.htm My Buccaneer 240 has wire cables for the halyards and
      Message 2 of 7 , May 22, 2012
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        Get mail sail slides and jib hanks at Duckworks too.  

        My Buccaneer 240 has wire cables for the halyards and the double braid attaches to that with an eye splice.  You can deduct the length of the wire part of the halyard from the overall length.

        I like lines that do not cut into my hands so i sized all my halyards at 3/8 and larger.  One exception I used 1/4 on my home made roller reefing so enough will wind on the spool for a 150 gennie

        I have a cabin roof traveler for my boom and I have 1/2 inch on that

        I chose to buy double braid poly rope in precut lengths because the ends are nicely sealed and fray proof  I found 50 foot lengths were adequate considering i have about 25ft wire halyards on the mast to start with.  I bought 100 feet of 1/4 for the roller furler I made and  and bought ready made dock lines and anchor rode with thimbles and eyes on them in the marine section at WalMart.  SeaDog brand which is a good intermediate  quality.. not the ultra-cheapest.

        I buy from Duckworks first.. prices are really good and they will sell yoou a single snap if you need it.

        Next I order from C-Me Marine  they have lots of stuff good prices

        then after that I order from Jamestown Distributors

        And I order from  West Marine last if I cannot get something anywhere else

        I also shop around on eBay with reasonably good results.

        Andrew



        From: jon <jons190@...>
        To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, May 21, 2012 4:18 PM
        Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Running rigging specs for buc 24

         
        Greetings all.

        So got the new buck home and found she has zero serviceable running rigging (should have looked at that a bit harder instead of trusting the salesguy..!!!!)

        Anyway, I pretty much have to replace/re-rig everything and have a question of line sizes and lengths...

        These are the specs I found online for a '79 240 buc.

        main halyard = 68 foot of 5/16"
        jib halyard = 83' of 5/16"
        main sheet = 45' of 3/8"
        Jib blocks sized at 5/16"

        I found a bunch of nova tech XLE line on ebay for:

        main halyard @ 83 foot of 5/16" for $32.00
        jib halyard @ 100 foot 5/16" for $48.00
        main sheet @ 50 foot of 3/8" for $35.00

        Does this seem about right? I fear what prices I may find at West Marine!!!!

        I also need main sail hanks (the little plasic hooks for running the sail up the mast) Does anyone know what size those are?

        Onward through the fog!



      • PhilC
        I would get rid of wire halyards if I had the chance. (You need to check that the sheeves in the mast can handle the size of the rope, and may have to replace
        Message 3 of 7 , May 23, 2012
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          I would get rid of wire halyards if I had the chance. (You need to check that the sheeves in the mast can handle the size of the rope, and may have to replace them.)

          Up-sizing lines - be sure the sheeves can handle larger lines. I sailed with a guy recently who has nothing smaller than 1/2" on a 25' boat! (He "likes to grip fat lines.") Doesn't seem to be one line on the whole boat that runs free, everything is jammed into the sheeves. Nothing works right.
          I personally always downsize, I have nothing larger than 5/16 (foir sheets) on any of my boats. I use a lot of 3/16 & 1/4 for control lines and halyards.

          Add APS and Defender to your list of catalogs to get. I buy a lot from APS.

          --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Andres Espino <ima_very_cool_cowboy@...> wrote:
          > My Buccaneer 240 has wire cables for the halyards and the double braid attaches to that with an eye splice.  You can deduct the length of the wire part of the halyard from the overall length.
          >
          > I like lines that do not cut into my hands so i sized all my halyards at 3/8 and larger. 
        • Andres Espino
          Hmmm I thought the wire halyards might be an improvement.. I never had a factory designed Marconi rig before either.  Yes the sheaves will handle the 3/8 line
          Message 4 of 7 , May 23, 2012
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            Hmmm I thought the wire halyards might be an improvement..

            I never had a factory designed Marconi rig before either.  Yes the sheaves will handle the 3/8 line I am using and there would be a big advantage.. I would not have to make all those eye splices on the double braid for the connection to the wire forks.  One eye splice per line and I can live with that.

            I am curious why you would opt out for the existing wire halyards.  Any particular reason?  And did most Buccaneers come with the wire halyards like my 240 or was that an add on by a previous owner?

            My previous gaffer was line rigged throughout  This boat has 4 wire halyards two front for foresails and a main and spare aft.  I was thinking to make one of those an adjustible running topping lift instead of hooking the boom on the backstay all the time.

            Andrew



            From: PhilC <PandD_Collins@...>
            To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2012 11:13 AM
            Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: Running rigging specs for buc 24

             
            I would get rid of wire halyards if I had the chance. (You need to check that the sheeves in the mast can handle the size of the rope, and may have to replace them.)

            Up-sizing lines - be sure the sheeves can handle larger lines. I sailed with a guy recently who has nothing smaller than 1/2" on a 25' boat! (He "likes to grip fat lines.") Doesn't seem to be one line on the whole boat that runs free, everything is jammed into the sheeves. Nothing works right.
            I personally always downsize, I have nothing larger than 5/16 (foir sheets) on any of my boats. I use a lot of 3/16 & 1/4 for control lines and halyards.

            Add APS and Defender to your list of catalogs to get. I buy a lot from APS.

            --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Andres Espino <ima_very_cool_cowboy@...> wrote:
            > My Buccaneer 240 has wire cables for the halyards and the double braid attaches to that with an eye splice.  You can deduct the length of the wire part of the halyard from the overall length.
            >
            > I like lines that do not cut into my hands so i sized all my halyards at 3/8 and larger. 



          • PhilC
            Wire halyards came stock on the boat. Wire halyards came stock on ALL boats of any size (like over 18 ) until just recently. Back in the 50s thru 80s this WAS
            Message 5 of 7 , May 23, 2012
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              Wire halyards came stock on the boat. Wire halyards came stock on ALL boats of any size (like over 18') until just recently.
              Back in the 50s thru 80s this WAS an improvement over all-rope, as rope was so stretchy and not durable. (BAck in the early 70s the top big boat ocean racers even used wire for Spinnaker Sheets! Can you Imagine that?!)
              Today, I would far rather have simple line, less weight, no barbs, no thimbles, no spices. (BTW, I don't have any splices on any of my boats. Just knots. It isn't that I don't believe in splices, just never learned how, and never needed to.)
              We have so many good lines to choose from today, there is no reason to live with wire halyards any more.

              Even standing rigging is going to synthetics on modern boats, and even though it has taken me a while to get used to it, it really is great stuff. Amazing stuff really.

              Yes, a boom topping lift can be Very handy, more useful than the backstay clip.

              --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Andres Espino <ima_very_cool_cowboy@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hmmm I thought the wire halyards might be an improvement..
              >
              >
              > I never had a factory designed Marconi rig before either.  Yes the sheaves will handle the 3/8 line I am using and there would be a big advantage.. I would not have to make all those eye splices on the double braid for the connection to the wire forks.  One eye splice per line and I can live with that.
              >
              > I am curious why you would opt out for the existing wire halyards.  Any particular reason?  And did most Buccaneers come with the wire halyards like my 240 or was that an add on by a previous owner?
              >
              > My previous gaffer was line rigged throughout  This boat has 4 wire halyards two front for foresails and a main and spare aft.  I was thinking to make one of those an adjustible running topping lift instead of hooking the boom on the backstay all the time.
              >
              > Andrew
              >
              >
              >
            • Andres Espino
              My last boat was gaff rigged with fully-batten main and lazy jacks and offered most of the simple reefing of a junk without all those lines.  the Friendship
              Message 6 of 7 , May 23, 2012
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                My last boat was gaff rigged with fully-batten main and lazy jacks and offered most of the simple reefing of a junk without all those lines.  the Friendship 21 had a full battened mainsail with simple one line reefing.

                A while back I added a how-to video of how to do an eye splice on double braid poly rope its in the links section.  They say knots reduce the strength of a line by 40%.  For a while I used to wrap around a thimble and whip the ends tight with mason line and it takes 4 inches of whipping on 3/8 lone

                However i have JUST learned of a new product that does the same thing!  It is a strong nylon clamp that creates eyes and ends on line  Below is from wholesale marine but E-Z-TY makes several styles and sizes  1/4, 5/16, 3/8 and 1/2 in I think 4 colors.  The have a bit to secure the open end too.

                E-Z-TY Rope Clamp 3-8"

                E-Z-TY Rope Clamp 3-8"

                Manufacturer: E-Z-TY
                Rope clamps solve the tedious task of splicing. It's patent pending design gives it the strength to far exceed rope manufacturers recommended weights. Made from space age composite material. Brass threaded inserts are molded in one half of the clamp and stainless steel screws are used to tighten the halves together. Suggested uses include pet leashes, horse leads, dock and fender lines, and much, much more.


                 
                COLOR :
                White 3-8"
                Black 3-8"
                List Price:$4.80
                Instant Savings (35%):- $1.68
                Starting At: $3.12




                From: PhilC <PandD_Collins@...>
                To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2012 7:16 PM
                Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: Running rigging specs for buc 24

                 
                Wire halyards came stock on the boat. Wire halyards came stock on ALL boats of any size (like over 18') until just recently.
                Back in the 50s thru 80s this WAS an improvement over all-rope, as rope was so stretchy and not durable. (BAck in the early 70s the top big boat ocean racers even used wire for Spinnaker Sheets! Can you Imagine that?!)
                Today, I would far rather have simple line, less weight, no barbs, no thimbles, no spices. (BTW, I don't have any splices on any of my boats. Just knots. It isn't that I don't believe in splices, just never learned how, and never needed to.)
                We have so many good lines to choose from today, there is no reason to live with wire halyards any more.

                Even standing rigging is going to synthetics on modern boats, and even though it has taken me a while to get used to it, it really is great stuff. Amazing stuff really.

                Yes, a boom topping lift can be Very handy, more useful than the backstay clip.

                --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Andres Espino <ima_very_cool_cowboy@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hmmm I thought the wire halyards might be an improvement..
                >
                >
                > I never had a factory designed Marconi rig before either.  Yes the sheaves will handle the 3/8 line I am using and there would be a big advantage.. I would not have to make all those eye splices on the double braid for the connection to the wire forks.  One eye splice per line and I can live with that.
                >
                > I am curious why you would opt out for the existing wire halyards.  Any particular reason?  And did most Buccaneers come with the wire halyards like my 240 or was that an add on by a previous owner?
                >
                > My previous gaffer was line rigged throughout  This boat has 4 wire halyards two front for foresails and a main and spare aft.  I was thinking to make one of those an adjustible running topping lift instead of hooking the boom on the backstay all the time.
                >
                > Andrew
                >
                >
                >



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